Film Archive

Countries (Film Archive)

German Competition Short Film 2015
Boy Ginan Seidl, Yalda Afsah

How does a girl escape the restrictions inscribed in the role of females in a traditional society? By becoming a “Boy”. In Afghanistan, “bachaposh” are girls who are raised as boys.

Boy

Documentary Film
Germany
2015
30 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Ray Peter Maletzki, Stephan Helmut Beier
Ginan Seidl, Yalda Afsah
Ginan Seidl
Ginan Seidl, Yalda Afsah
Steffen Martin, Manuela Schininá
How does a girl escape the restrictions inscribed in the role of females in a traditional society? By becoming a “Boy”. In Afghanistan, “bachaposh” are girls who are raised as boys. The artist duo Afsah/Seidl follows two girls and their choice of the role they want to take in life, creating a touching study of gender and freedom in dreamlike images and long tracking shots that capture the people in their social environment.

Grit Lemke
German Competition 2015
Der Kuaför aus der Keupstraße Andreas Maus

The NSU nail bomb attack that injured 22 people in Cologne in 2004, where only the victims were suspected later. Complex reconstruction of a scandal.

Der Kuaför aus der Keupstraße

Documentary Film
Germany
2015
92 minutes
subtitles: 
German

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Herbert Schwering, Christine Kiauk
Andreas Maus
Maciej Sledziecki
Hajo Schomerus
Rolf Mertler
Maik Baumgärtner, Andreas Maus
Ralf Weber
Wednesday afternoon was deliberately chosen. There were a lot of customers in front of and in the brothers Özcan and Hasan Yildirim’s barbershop on 9 June 2004, when 700 three-inch carpenters’ nails turned into projectiles with a 250 metre range. 22 people were injured. The attack was infamous; the course of the investigations was equally scandalous: the victims were suspected. CCTV material was not analysed and Federal Minister of the Interior Otto Schily decisively ruled out a right wing background. It was only in 2001 that this crime was solved in the course of the revelations concerning the right wing extremist terrorist “National Socialist Underground” group. The trial continues until the present day.

Ten years after the Cologne nail bomb attack, director Andreas Maus focuses on giving a voice to those whom nobody wanted to hear for a long time. He deploys narrative strategies to establish a distance in order to expose how systematically matters were hushed up, suppressed and denied. Documentary and re-enacted material are interwoven, actors perform next to affected persons, spaces are reconstructed. Maus overwrites the hackneyed televised images with his own visual inventions. The camera stops, the look at the audience freezes. One is tempted to ask what exactly is supposed to come after the “culture of welcome”?

Cornelia Klauß
International Programme 2015
Die Angst des Wolfs vor dem Wolf Juliane Jaschnow

A howl in the wilderness. A shape moves back and forth in the bloody red flickering light of a double fight – against the wolf, but even more against the fear of the wolf. No escape, the razor’s edge – powerfully eloquent.

Die Angst des Wolfs vor dem Wolf

Animated Film
Germany
2014
5 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Ostpol e.V.
Juliane Jaschnow
Juliane Jaschnow
Juliane Jaschnow
Juliane Jaschnow
Stefan Petermann
Juliane Jaschnow, Stefan Petermann
A howl in the wilderness. A shape moves back and forth in the bloody red flickering light of a double fight – against the wolf, but even more against the fear of the wolf. No escape, the razor’s edge – powerfully eloquent. An equally minimalist and gripping film poem by filmmaker Juliane Jaschnow and writer Stefan Petermann about the dialectics of becoming a victim or a perpetrator. Whatever side you’re on: you’ll lose if you stay as you are.

Nadja Rademacher
International Programme 2015
No Signal Katharina Huber

The violence is planned. Whether as a protest or simply a statement, the manifesto and the stone to throw are ready. Now it’s a matter of waiting, killing time and mentally preparing for the confrontation.

No Signal

Animated Film
UK
2014
6 minutes
subtitles: 
_without dialogue / subtitles

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Katharina Huber
Wolf Eyes
Katharina Huber
Marian Mentrup
The violence is planned. Whether as a protest or simply a statement, the manifesto and the stone to throw are ready. Now it’s a matter of waiting, killing time and mentally preparing for the confrontation. Like a warrior. But the fear won’t go away and every sound, every movement reminds you of what may be about to happen.

Annegret Richter
International Programme 2015
Valentina, 26 Alexander Riedel

She came from Kosovo at the age of four and has finally arrived after years of “temporary admission”. An example of successful integration, but mainly the fun portrait of a wild chick.

Valentina, 26

Documentary Film
Germany
2015
45 minutes
subtitles: 
German

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Bettina Timm
Alexander Riedel
Michael Leuthner
Ulrike Tortora
Björn Rothe
In 2007 we met Valentina in Leipzig as the protagonist of Alexander Riedel’s film “Run Out”. Her unrestrained vitality and aggression in the midst of the agony of a Munich home for asylum seekers left a lasting impression – even though no one believed that she would easily make it in this Germany which even then was not waiting for someone like her – from Kosovo, an “economic refugee”!

1. Valentina herself never saw the film completely or at least can’t remember whether she did, as she makes clear today, eight years later – in her inimitable way which, thank God, hasn’t changed. And, 2., no she didn’t make it easily. But she did, very impressively.

Isn’t this boring – a film about a successful integration? Where is the much quoted height of the dramatic hero’s fall? Okay folks, look at Valentina! She definitely doesn’t fit the mould of the “positive heroine”. When we see her speed through Munich with a patient (attention: she’s working as a nurse!), slouched on the wheelchair’s arm rest, a cigarette dangling from her mouth, we realise: the sponti slogan of the past, “Don’t leave us alone with these Germans!” was answered. We can never have enough people like Valentina.

Grit Lemke