Film Archive

Sections (Film Archive)

International Programme 2017
Accordion Class Zuqiang Peng

The image of China as a music nation is dominated by drilled masses and exceptional instrumentalists. This accordion class, however, presents a different image.

Accordion Class

Documentary Film
China
2016
20 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Zuqiang Peng
Zuqiang Peng
Zuqiang Peng
Zuqiang Peng
Zuqiang Peng
The image of China as a music nation is dominated by drilled masses and exceptional instrumentalists. This accordion class, however, presents a different image: wrapped in down anoraks, children practice “Hänschen klein”. During the Cultural Revolution, the piano and violin were frowned upon as “bourgeois”, unlike the accordion – its performative qualities were well suited to propaganda. Today the heart-warming squeezing looks almost like a gesture of resistance against the state-promoted virtuoso culture.

Esther Buss
International Programme 2017
Slaughter Youth House Wang Yan Peng

The vegetables in China – contaminated by pesticides. The local meat – loaded with hormones. Do they still want to stay in China, Wang Yan Peng asks two college students.

Slaughter Youth House

Documentary Film
China
2017
30 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Xiu Jing
Wang Yan Peng
Wang Yan Peng, Con Kui
Wang Yan Peng, Guo Hon
Wang Yan Peng
The vegetables in China – contaminated by pesticides. The local meat – loaded with hormones. Do they still want to stay in China, Wang Yan Peng asks two college students. Sure, it’s a good place to live. Whether the student residence where the six young men in this film share a small room is also a good place to live remains open for discussion.

Carolin Weidner

Taming the Horse

Documentary Film
Canada,
China
2017
124 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Aonan Yang, Xun Yu, Tao Gu
Tao Gu
Tao Gu
Catherine Van Der Donckt
30-year-old Dong is lying on the bed, smoking and wondering: “What can I do to be a valuable member of society? Should I get up? No, I won’t.” When director Tao Gu, who hasn’t seen his old friend in ten years, meets him again in 2011, he meets a man crushed by personal defeat and the latest turbo developments of Chinese society. A man living in student digs who, with his leather jacket, lovesickness, guitar and alcohol, has come to epitomise the antithesis of the dictatorial career ethos. Dong spends his days dreaming and living out his emotional outbreaks in a social environment programmed for reticence.

This sensitive portrait doesn’t show a deliberate dropout but a man whose failure is due to self-doubt and the capitalist “freedom’s” pressure to succeed, who despite his youth is already cleverly sidestepped by a next generation boldly juggling with the logics of the market economy. The protagonist and the filmmaker set out by train to Dong’s home in Inner Mongolia. This train journey of several days runs like a thread through the film as it revels in Dong’s dream of taming horses in the endless steppe and enjoying a peaceful life with a simple Mongolian girl. The young man breaks off the journey.

André Eckardt