Film Archive

Sections (Film Archive)

Jahr

Countries (Film Archive)

Am Siel

Documentary Film
Germany
1962
13 minutes
subtitles: 
No

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Peter Nestler Filmproduktion, München
Peter Nestler, Kurt Ulrich
Kurt Ulrich, Peter Nestler
Peter Nestler, Kurt Ulrich
“I am an old tidal outlet at whose end a village is situated. My story was ground to dust by water and sand.” Can a tidal outlet – a canal connecting the North Sea and the harbour – speak? This question caused quite a stir in 1962 and led some people to reject this film, in which a landscape and its inhabitants are not described from the point of view of an omniscient narrator, but from that of a tidal outlet. Pictures of a deserted beach, a drive through the village, decaying walls, portraits of people. Pure poetry. “I am as tired as the tarred houses.”
– Grit Lemke

Aufsätze

Documentary Film
Germany
1963
11 minutes
subtitles: 
No

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Peter Nestler Filmproduktion, München
Peter Nestler, Kurt Ulrich
Kurt Ulrich, Peter Nestler
Peter Nestler
Peter Nestler
The life of children in the Bernese Uplands in essays and simple observations composed and read by them. This film was made in only four days in collaboration with the children and their teacher (“Our teacher is a beautiful lady.”). Going to school in the snow, the classroom with its stove in which a child lights the fire, writing on slates, scrubbed school desks, the children’s drawings. This view of the mountain farmers’ hard life only appears to be naive: in its concentration on essentials, details which may only be visible to a child’s eye, reality seems almost magically transported.
– Grit Lemke

Ein Arbeiterclub in Sheffield

Documentary Film
Germany
1965
41 minutes
subtitles: 
No

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Süddeutscher Rundfunk SDR, Stuttgart
Peter Nestler
Dirk Alvermann, Peter Nestler
Peter Nestler
Peter Nestler
It’s the workers, their daily life, culture, hard work at the steel mill and above all their self-help organisations that Nestler is interested in and describes in loving detail. A world of the underprivileged, whose solidarity, far from any social romanticism, still makes it appear alive and strong. A picture that the SDR disapproved of. When Peter Nestler, after long discussions, refused to add an explanatory “neutral voice-over”, the film was finally broadcast under the title “Menschen in Sheffield” (People in Sheffield), which effectively eliminated the workers from the title, and the co-operation with Nestler was terminated once and for all.
– Grit Lemke

Mülheim (Ruhr)

Documentary Film
Germany
1964
14 minutes
subtitles: 
No

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Peter Nestler Filmproduktion, München
Peter Nestler, Reinald Schnell
Dieter Süverkrüp
Peter Nestler
Peter Nestler
Modern buildings, backyards, small grocery stores, pub goers, card players, people taking a stroll, the charm of faded bourgeois mansions and the suburbs of the industry: factory grounds, chimneys and cranes, the shabby houses of the workers, the harbour, ships on the river Ruhr, a child in the street. This portrait of a city with its unique score of Dieter Süverkrüp’s jazzy, sometimes dissonant guitar, a Jew’s harp and the driving beat of the metronome was not very popular with politicians and the media: too ugly, too grey. It was to take almost twenty years (when the Mülheim depicted in the film had largely disappeared) before the Rheinische Post newspaper stated: “simply sensational.”
– Grit Lemke

Rheinstrom

Documentary Film
Germany
1965
13 minutes
subtitles: 
No

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Peter Nestler Filmproduktion, München
Peter Nestler
Peter Nestler
Peter Nestler
Dieter Süverkrüp
Instead of looking at the romantic river Rhine, merry with wine-making and -drinking, the film focuses on the hard work of the people linked to the river: the wine growers on the slopes, the boatmen with their “clear head and firm hands” and the barmaid behind the counter where the workers drink. Text and visuals reveal a respect for the people who make it possible to enjoy drinking wine in the first place – scenes of which serve as contrast here – and are paid badly for their labours.
– Grit Lemke

Tod und Teufel

Documentary Film
Germany
2009
55 minutes
subtitles: 
No

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Strandfilm, Frankfurt a.M., Kintopp HB, Stockholm
Peter Nestler
Peter Nestler, Eric von Rosen
Dieter Reifarth
Peter Nestler
Using almost exclusively historic photos, Peter Nestler embarks on a quest into the history of his own family and one of the darkest chapters of European history. Count Erik von Rosen, Nestler’s grandfather, was an explorer in Africa, a discoverer, photographer, collector of ethnographics, and – a high-ranking Nazi. The trail takes him from the genocide of ten million people in the Congo straight to the Holocaust. The horror lurks in the proud, colonial gestures of the carefully arranged photos.
– Grit Lemke

“A courageous film by a courageous filmmaker” (Viennale 2009)

Von Griechenland

Documentary Film
Germany
1965
28 minutes
subtitles: 
No

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Peter Nestler Filmproduktion, München
Peter Nestler, Reinald Schnell
Mikis Theodorakis
Peter Nestler
Peter Nestler
Peter Nestler
The first part of this film is devoted to the Greek resistance against fascism and the civil war for independence. While the voice-over recites facts and names, photos take us into the past and the everyday lives of the people. The second part takes us to Greece in 1965, where the masses are protesting against the removal of the liberal Georgios Papandreou. – Two years later the military junta seized power in Greece. When Filmecho/Filmwoche called the film “communist”, it was doomed. It was rarely shown and originated the stigma that ultimately made it impossible for Peter Nestler to continue to work in Germany.
– Grit Lemke

Zeit

Documentary Film
Germany
1992
43 minutes

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Südwestfunk SWF, Baden-Baden
Peter Nestler
Peter Nestler
Peter Nestler
Peter Nestler
Seven Hungarian workers and farmers who began to paint or make sculptures at an advanced age present their works. Contemporary history, tragic and traumatic experiences are revealed, a century and a human life snatched from oblivion in a painting (which would be termed “naive” by most) or a wooden sculpture.
“The film is called ‘Time’ because there is so much of the way the past shifts and becomes homogenised in it.” (Peter Nestler in a conversation with Christoph Hübner)
– Grit Lemke