Film Archive

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International Programme 2018
(M)Other Antonia Hungerland

How does the image of motherhood change when egg donation, surrogate motherhood or adoption add various alternatives to the male-female-intercourse-biology model?

(M)Other

Documentary Film
Germany
2018
88 minutes
subtitles: 
English
German

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Christopher Zitterbart, Saskia Veigel, Filmuniversität Babelsberg KONRAD WOLF
Antonia Hungerland
Markus Zierhofer
Antonia Hungerland
Antonella Sarubbi
Antonia Hungerland
Tim Altrichter, Benedikt Ludwig, Christoph Walter, Luise Hofmann
It’s quite realistic today for a child to have three mothers: an egg donor gives her genes to a baby who is born by a surrogate mother and raised by another woman or a person who may be male and gay. The classic concept of “natural” motherhood reaches its limits here (and elsewhere).

The definition of motherhood is being contested. The general controversy about changing social norms is reflected in the debate about (good) mothers. This discussion, as “(M)Other” very clearly demonstrates, concerns everybody. Both those who have to contend with stereotypes and prejudice as “classic” mothers and those who claim the term even though they do not correspond to the established “model” that stubbornly resists all obvious changes. Antonia Hungerland shows that the seemingly personal is still (or: today more than ever) highly political.

Luc-Carolin Ziemann


Nominated for the Goethe-Institut Documentary Film Prize

International Programme 2018
All Creatures Welcome Sandra Trostel

A creative dive into the CCC hackers’ philosophy, which is not to bemoan the growing digitisation of life but to seize the technology to improve our life.

All Creatures Welcome

Documentary Film
Germany
2018
87 minutes
subtitles: 
German
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Sandra Trostel
Sandra Trostel
Thies Mynther
Sandra Trostel, Lilli Thalgott
Sandra Trostel
Jon Frickey
Sandra Trostel, Thies Mynther
Jonas Hummel

A playful and highly informative attempt to describe the anarchic variety of creatures who regularly meet at camps and international conventions under the umbrella of Europe’s biggest hacker association, the Chaos Computer Club. Sandra Trostel looks over the shoulders of nerds, political activists, makers and “other galactic life forms” and shows, complemented by short animated sequences, what it means to regard society not as a given fact but as malleable material there to be “hacked”. Renouncing glorification but revealing a well-developed sense for inner contradictions, the film portrays a (sub)culture whose concerns have long become mainstream.



Luc-Carolin Ziemann



Nominated for the Goethe-Institut Documentary Film Prize


International Programme 2015
Als wir die Zukunft waren Lars Barthel, Gabriele Denecke, Andreas Voigt, Peter Kahane, Thomas Knauf, Hannes Schönemann. Ralf Marschalleck

People who were born in the 1950s in the GDR: the childhood memories of a generation. Six miniatures, rich in wit, nostalgia, and poetry. The echo of a utopia.

Als wir die Zukunft waren

Documentary Film
Germany
2015
87 minutes
subtitles: 
No

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Barbara Etz
Lars Barthel, Gabriele Denecke, Andreas Voigt, Peter Kahane, Thomas Knauf, Hannes Schönemann. Ralf Marschalleck
Marcel Noll
Lars Barthel, Andreas Köfer, Thomas Plenert, Marcus Lenz, Sebastian Hattop
Grete Jentzen, Gudrun Steinbrück-Plenert, Pamela Homann, Mathieu Honoré
motionworks Halle, Jörg Herrmann
Uwe Busch, Maurice Wilkering, Thomas Funk, Nic Nagel
Generations define themselves by the future – sometimes there’s too little, sometimes too much. The generation born in the GDR in the 1950s were taught from an early age that they were the future of socialism. Quite a responsibility. And it didn’t quite work out, either.

The six male and one female directors of this omnibus film have their socialisation in common, and the fact that they all worked for DEFA. Nonetheless, their memories of childhood in a country that was still marked by the war, but also by a spirit of departure, are stylistically very different: from strict visual concepts to the exuberant use of animation or re-enacted scenes. They are strongest when they are visually condensed, opening associative spaces, or when they manage to tell their story from a child’s perspective, but with the knowledge of the adult. Most of them are children who lose first their father and then their faith in socialism. An interesting aspect is that the West didn’t only mean fragrant parcels, Westerns, toy guns or Uncle Alfred but also departed fathers. And even the fathers who stayed were mostly absent. The East, that was the mothers, beautiful and strong. Sometimes it broke them.

Ultimately, the problem was that socialism didn’t have faith in its children. Their narratives are like the echo of a utopia.

Grit Lemke
International Programme 2012
Anatomie des Weggehens Oliver Tataru

A family who left Romania a long time ago and never quite arrived in Germany. There is a rift between the generations and their memories. An attempt of reconciliation and rapprochement.

Anatomie des Weggehens

Documentary Film
Germany
2012
73 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Oliver Tataru
Oliver Tataru
Simon Weber
Oliver Tataru
Oliver Tataru
Wasn’t there anything worth mentioning? No, not for Oliver Tatarus’ father. What should he talk about with his son in front of the camera? But the director doesn’t give up. As a child he didn’t live in Germany but in Bucharest, Romania. As a child he saw no reason to leave. But his parents saw no future in Ceauşescu’s Romania. And one day the decision had been taken. A leave-taking began that was to last two years. An agonising break-up that never quite turned into a departure and gradually isolated the members of the family from each other. At some point half the flat was cleared: sold. And he says there wasn’t anything?
The son wants to know why he was denied a future in his home country. He confronts his parents, questions them separately. His reaction when they refuse to contribute to this recycling of feelings is as sullen as a child’s. In the middle of the interview his mother loses her composure because her son apparently still refuses to understand what the reality in Bucharest was like then: “like Hiroshima.”
Tataru returns to his hometown to compare memories. He finds poetic images of desertion, the grey tones of the Bucharest facades that he once thought of as velvety, gaps in the walls as wide as the memory gap running through his family. But the cement is already there in the subjective images. Old wounds and fears come together to form the picture of a family, a puzzle of tensions and emotions.
– Lars Meyer

Andes Uprising, a Buffer City Re-Inventing Itself Through Architecture

Documentary Film
Germany
2019
14 minutes
subtitles: 
English
German

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Bernardo Villagra Meruvia
Bernardo Villagra Meruvia
Bernardo Villagra Meruvia
El Alto, Bolivia, is growing fast – wild, but not shapeless. An investigation into urban aesthetics comes across the Cholets: miniature palaces which serve as residential and business premises for wealthy indigenous Aymara families. The colourful, shining constructions may resemble spaceships lost in the urban wastelands. But a double movement of expert commentary and city symphony lays bare the social foundations of this eclectic architecture.

Lukas Foerster
International Programme 2017
Anne Clark – I’ll Walk Out Into Tomorrow Claus Withopf

An eloquent and visually stunning look at the life and work of the New Wave icon whose songs fill the dance floors until today – even if you would probably overlook her if you met her in the street.

Anne Clark – I’ll Walk Out Into Tomorrow

Documentary Film
Germany
2017
81 minutes
subtitles: 
German

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Gerd Haag (TAG/TRAUM Filmproduktion), Mike Beilfuss (Kinescope Film), Torsten Frehse (Neue Visionen Filmproduktion), Claus Withopf (Claus Withopf Filmproduktion)
Claus Withopf
Nina Werth, Daniel Meinl, Claus Withopf
Christopher Tworuschka, Claus Withopf
Claus Withopf
Michel Klöfkorn, Johannes Grehl, Hagen Röhrig
Anne Clark eludes all categories and stereotypes. She sees herself as a poet and spoken word artist while she is celebrated around the world as a pioneer of electronic music and New Wave and regarded by many as one of the trailblazers of Techno. Having grown up with the DIY punk ethics of the late 1970s, she became active early on, even though it wasn’t always easy to make her way in the male-dominated music industry. Her very first singles, “Sleeper in Metropolis” and “Our Darkness” became classics that influenced generations of musicians.

Despite her cult following, the film shows Clark as an approachable and likeable person who allows deep insights into her work and comments with great lucidity on social political issues. Mixing interviews, archival footage and concert recordings, the film uses graphics to make language itself the focus of attention. The distinct characteristics of Clark’s works are gradually unfolded: an oeuvre that is absolutely unique in both music and literature without ever getting lost in l’art pour l’art. This portrait, which invites the audience to (re-)discover Anne Clark as an extraordinary artist, is also a powerful plea for remaining true to oneself as a person and as an artist.

Luc-Carolin Ziemann


Nominated for Goethe-Institut Documentary Film Prize
International Programme 2018
Appalachian Holler Matthias Lawetzky

The end of coal-mining has left the Appalachians with environmental destruction and unemployment. Making music together gives the people something to hold on to and some dignity.

Appalachian Holler

Documentary Film
Germany,
USA
2018
29 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Matthias Lawetzky (Hochschule für Gestaltung Offenbach am Main)
Matthias Lawetzky
Matthias Lawetzky
Matthias Lawetzky
Matthias Lawetzky
Matthias Lawetzky
You don’t get rich in the Appalachian Mountains. “They’re trying to get thataway, but they usually die before they do,” they say here. The end of coal mining left the inhabitants with its consequential problems, environmental destruction and unemployment. Making music together – if only with spoons – gives the people in one of the remotest spots of the US something to hold on to and some dignity.

Fabian Tietke
International Programme 2012
Arbeit Heimat Opel Ulrike Franke, Michael Loeken

Apprentices in the Bochum Opel works accompanied over the period of their apprenticeship: drilling, swotting, giving everything, being “Opelaners” – in times of job cuts and plant closures.

Arbeit Heimat Opel

Documentary Film
Germany
2012
90 minutes
subtitles: 
No

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Ulrike Franke, Filmproduktion Loeken Franke
Ulrike Franke, Michael Loeken
Jörg Adams, Michael Loeken, Reinhard Köcher, Dieter Stürmer
Bert Schmidt
Ulrike Franke, Michael Loeken
Filipp Forberg, Axel Schmidt
The world trusts German cars; “Made in Germany” is regarded as a guarantee of solid craftsmanship. This has a lot to do with Germany’s unique system of apprentice training, which is based on centuries of tradition. But what’s it like to be an apprentice today, especially at one of the flagships of the German car industry?
Ulrike Franke and Michael Loeken portray six 16- to 19-year-olds who started their apprenticeship as industrial mechanics at the Bochum Opel works in 2009, and their instructor. They are there when the boys pull on their Opel shirts for the first time, sweat at the drill and lathe, measure a piece for the hundredth time and despair when they fail once more to satisfy Mr. Kranz’s standards; when they boredly play with their mobile phones during boring union meetings and suddenly loose all coolness before a test. It’s still true that everyone has to start at the bottom of the ladder, but something is different: Loeken/Franke confront the images of the boys’ working life – filmed exclusively at the workplace – with news reports of imminent job cuts at Opel. Iron principles and pre-shaped identities – I am an “Opelaner” and Opel is part of Ruhr destrict like the Schalke football club – are destabilised by the ups and downs of the stock market. In this phase of transition from school and home to working life, each apprentice develops his own strategy to deal with that insecurity. Because everything could be over before it even started. Opel recently announced that intend to give up Bochum as a location in 2016 was announced.
– Grit Lemke
International Programme 2019
Aura Timm Völkner

Migraine is a lifelong unchosen companion. “Aura” tells a visually impressive and intense tale about life with it and the attempt to become reconciled to it.

Aura

Animated Film
Germany
2019
3 minutes
subtitles: 
No

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Fabienne Priess
Timm Völkner
Andreas Skandy
Timm Völkner
Timm Völkner, Ryoji Yamada
Timm Völkner
Jan Brett
A voice speaks in very intimate terms to a lifelong, not self-chosen companion. Remarkably creative and precise, Timm Voelkner guides us through a flow from one image to the next, building bridges between the emotional states of a person suffering from classical migraine and the perception disorders in the aura phase. In only two minutes, the film tells a visual and intense tale of life with an often underestimated disorder and of the attempt to get reconciled to it.

André Eckardt
International Programme 2019
Autobahn Daniel Abma

Traffic on the B 61 through the spa town of Bad Oeynhausen is permanently gridlocked. The promised cure is a bypass whose construction is documented here: with residents and passers-by.

Autobahn

Documentary Film
Germany
2019
85 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Niklas Burghardt, Johannes Wöpkemeier
Daniel Abma
Henning Fuchs
David Schittek
Momas Schütze
Daniel Abma
Malte Eiben
The spa town of Bad Oeynhausen: Every day, thousands of trucks roll through the city centre and over the B 61 federal road which connects the A 2 and A 30 motorways, respectively Warsaw and Rotterdam. When the threat of losing its status as a health resort looms on the horizon, which means losing the inviting title of “Bad”, something has to change: A bypass is to be built.

Over a period of eight years, the film documents the gridlocked traffic at this bottleneck, the efforts of the mayor, police, fire brigade and construction companies, the delays in the construction of the northern bypass and above all the reactions of the affected residents. The latter look forward to some quiet and relief – or will soon have the motorway right in front of their door. The long-term documentation focuses less on the large-scale infrastructural measures than on their consequences for the people living by the roadside. Other stories are “picked up” there with a fine instinct for unusual characters and leaving lots of space for their personalities and quirks. These include the local tradition of counting trucks on the federal road or the construction site as well as taking a walk or jogging on the long unfinished section of the road.

Frederik Lang
Healthy Workplaces Film Award 2015
Automatic Fitness Alejandra Tomei, Alberto Couceiro

Life on an exacting conveyor belt. This detailed puppet animation that sparkles with ideas is a scathing satire on our brave new working world that thinks the term “human resources” through to the end and invents a new running technique in the process.

Automatic Fitness

Animated Film
Germany
2015
21 minutes
subtitles: 
_without dialogue / subtitles

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Alejandra Tomei
Alejandra Tomei, Alberto Couceiro
Boris Joens, Ole Wulfers
Alejandra Tomei
Dietmar Kraus
Alberto Couceiro
Alejandra Tomei, Alberto Couceiro
Dietrich Körner
Imagine waking up in the morning in your bed, which stands on an assembly line. An automatic wake-up call and a few pills handed to you by robots make you fit for the working day. And so on and so forth at a predetermined speed. Life on an exacting conveyor belt. This detailed puppet animation that sparkles with ideas is a scathing satire on our brave new working world that thinks the term “human resources” through to the end and invents a new running technique in the process.

Lars Meyer



Healthy Worklplaces Film Award 2015

International Programme 2019
Bekar Evi – Das Junggesellenhaus Dirk Schäfer

Life is no picnic, especially not for Kurdish bachelors in Istanbul. Seven seasonal workers live in an unusual flat share in a dilapidated house.

Bekar Evi – Das Junggesellenhaus

Documentary Film
Germany
2019
76 minutes
subtitles: 
English
German

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Dirk Schäfer
Dirk Schäfer
Deborah Wargon
Nikola Krivokuca
Dirk Schäfer
Metin Bozkurt
Life is no picnic, especially not for a Kurdish bachelor in Istanbul. Seven single seasonal workers from Eastern Anatolia live in a dilapidated house in the metropolis. The men from two generations form an unusual flat sharing community. They live and sleep at extremely close quarters, sharing a single shower, which occasionally leads to heated arguments: typical flat share disputes about doing the dishes or tidying up. The older among them settle them with fatherly authority.

The protagonists talk about their origins and dreams. The German filmmaker Dirk Schäfer, who has lived in Istanbul for a long time, interweaves their poetic descriptions with sensitive observations of their partnership of convenience. Experiences of social discrimination and chicanery leave their traces, but humour and friendship make their life easier – or, as one of the “bachelors” puts it with a touch of humour: Now he is a street seller of Ottoman sugar paste to lend some sweetness to his life.

Annina Wettstein

Beyond the Wave

Documentary Film
Germany,
Japan
2013
83 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Gregor Streiber
Kyoko Miyake
Shigeru Umebayashi
Kozo Natsuumi, Shai Levy
Joby Gee
Kyoko Miyake
Dominik Raetz, Tsukada Dai
Collapsed roofs, broken windowpanes, withered plants, dead animals – a deserted place. A grocery store looks almost exactly as it did on that day in March 2011. The few people one sees wear white paper suits and surgical masks. They are the ones who lost the world they lived in on that March day. One of them is aunt Kuniko. “It’s only natural to look for new sources of energy.” These words once advertised the construction of a nuclear plant in this now dead region. “Beyond the Wave” is a unique demonstration that after the disaster of Fukushima this sentence should become the leitmotif of our future. Caught between the grief of having lost their past and hopes of a personal perspective, the protagonists are forced to redefine themselves in their ruined home, this no-man’s country that many left long ago. Kyoko Miyake shows, not least through her personal voice-over, how a fairly atypical, albeit non-angry rebellion starts to germinate in the remaining Japanese citizens, and how her businesslike aunt and many others are ceaseless attempting to reclaim the meaning of their lives, against all prejudice and in the spirit of “I cannot let this disaster ruin all my efforts.”

Claudia Lehmann

Bianca läuft …

Documentary Film
Austria,
Germany
2013
83 minutes
subtitles: 
No

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Tina Bara
Tina Bara
Bianca Maria Samer
Tina Bara
Tina Bara, Oliver Brodt
Tina Bara
Tina Bara, Oliver Brodt
Bianca, a young woman living in the Austrian province of Burgenland, is a mystery. She is a passionate runner, but when she walks her legs fail. She is a highly talented painter, who keeps sketching photorealistic images of herself that show her pierced, nailed, cut, in flowing robes, or tied to her running shoes. She talks about her diseases, the collapses happening at shorter and shorter intervals, and her passion for collecting dead animals, always with a smile on her ageless face.
The photographer and filmmaker Tina Bara respects her protagonist’s cocoon. She lets the paintings speak, which show cruel signs of self-destruction and self-hatred, screaming out for someone to probe the causes of this. At the same time, “Bianca Is Running” is a very quiet film whose strength lies in uncertainty. The director turns this cautious, gradual approach and her own doubts into the dramatic principle of her debut film, creating a structure that is open to interpretation. The encounters with Bianca take us into uncertain territory – neither she nor the film offer any footholds.

Cornelia Klauß
International Programme 2019
Blieschow Christoph Sarow

Tom spends his summer holidays at his grandfather’s, where many things are thrillingly beautiful, some scary and others rough, like his cousin, for example, and farm life.

Blieschow

Animated Film
Germany
2019
9 minutes
subtitles: 
_without dialogue / subtitles

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Lena-Carolin Lohfink
Christoph Sarow
Andreas Pfeiffer
Christoph Sarow
Christoph Sarow
Christoph Sarow, Sofiia Melnyk, Janina Putzker, Laura Staab, Sarah Schulz, Maria Schmidt
Christoph Sarow, Simon Thummet
Marc Fragstein, Luis Schöffend
Gameboy in hand, a ramble through the ripe cornfield, the island in the Baltic Sea lying there in the yellow sunlight. It’s summer and Tom is spending his holidays at his grandfather’s, where many things are thrillingly beautiful, some scary and others rough, like his cousin, for example, and farm life. With great sensitivity and in strong, warm colours, Christoph Sarow tells of a small step on the path towards growing up and, with magnificent associative images, allows us insights into the boy’s emotional world.

André Eckardt

Bohemia, IA

Documentary Film
Germany,
USA
2017
30 minutes
subtitles: 
No

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Angelo Wemmje (Kunsthochschule für Medien Köln)
Angelo Wemmje
Angelo Wemmje
Angelo Wemmje
Angelo Wemmje
90 per cent of the “Corn State” Iowa are used for agriculture. But this doesn’t necessarily mean that the “natives” this film focuses on are naive hillbillies. They make music and take Polaroid pictures, watch lectures on quantum physics on YouTube or discuss whether Elvis or Picasso is more “goth”. Buddy Holly’s “Listen to Me” drifts over from a cornfield – and Iowa’s other attribute of “Swing State” suddenly takes on a different meaning.

Esther Buss