Film Archive

Countries (Film Archive)

Kids DOK 2015
About a Mother Dina Velikovskaya

A mother protects and cares for her sons while they’re little. But even later, when they have already left home, she is always there when her sons need help.

About a Mother

Animated Film
Russia
2015
8 minutes
subtitles: 
_without dialogue / subtitles

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Lyubov Gajdukova
Dina Velikovskaya
Artyom Fadeyev
Dina Velikovskaya
Dina Velikovskaya
Tatyana Jacyna, Khatuna Tatuashvili, Dina Velikovskaya
Dina Velikovskaya
Artyom Fadeyev
A mother protects and cares for her sons while they’re little. But even later, when they have already left home, she is always there when her sons need help.
International Programme 2015
Back Home Inna Denisova

Coming home to Simferopol. Encounters with fanatical Putin supporters and critics who have to leave Crimea. An authentic look at a deeply divided society.

Back Home

Documentary Film
Russia
2015
74 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Inna Denisova
Inna Denisova
DJ Enjoykin
Egor Maximov, Oleg Morgun
Natasha Josef
Anna Shifrina
Inna Denisova
Roman Bakharev
We’ll probably never know exactly how the annexation of Crimea happened. But Inna Denisova, who realised this no budget film with lots of energy, is not concerned with the covert army operations or the open political rhetoric. She is interested in the subtle atmospheric shifts that come with the geopolitical ones. How do you live in a sea of Russian white, blue and red and graffiti posters that some see as promises of happiness and others as chauvinistic boasts? Denisova counters Putin’s great project of bringing the peninsula back into the realm with her own small, very personal return to her native city, Simferopol. Two versions of “Back Home” – and the question of what this was, is and will be: home, belonging, childhood.

She talks to old school friends, artists and gallery owners, avoiding all polemics. Some stay, many leave. Whether interviewing a friend of director Oleg Sencov (sentenced to 20 years hard labour for “terrorism” without a scrap of evidence) or looking at the extremely martial re-enactment event culture (tank lightshows for the whole family), whether talking to a cartoonist who has no more tourists to draw, which is why he now portrays Zhirinovsky and the “friendly little people” of the annexation … one thing becomes clear: it’s a deeply divided society whose individual members feel even more deeply insecure.

Barbara Wurm
International Programme 2014
Brutus Svetlana Filippova

Brutus always glanced into human eyes only for a moment and immediately turned away. Nobody knows better than dogs how fast people’s affections can change.

Brutus

Animated Film
Russia
2014
11 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Lyubov Gaidukova
Svetlana Filippova
Svetlana Filippova
Svetlana Filippova
Ekaterina Boykova, Svetlana Zimina, Sara Magambetova, Svetlana Filippova
Svetlana Filippova
Artem Fadeev
Brutus always glanced into human eyes only for a moment and immediately turned away. Nobody knows better than dogs how fast people’s affections can change.

Convictions

Documentary Film
Poland,
Russia
2016
63 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Vlad Ketkovich, Mariya Chuprinskaya, Maciek Hamela, Tatyana Chistova
Tatyana Chistova
Omari Zverkov
Mariya Falileyeva , Omari Zverkov, Miroslav Mishinov, Aleksey Strelov, Dmitriy Medvedev
Tatyana Chistova
Marina Sheinman
These are the stories and trials of four young men who decided that to them “pacifism” is not a swearword. But this conviction means they are swimming against the tide of a thoroughly re-militarised society which has been forging men of steel for years now. Conscientious objection is listed in section 328 of Russian criminal law.

Shy Roman is well-briefed and tries his luck with great idols like Leo Tolstoy and Albert Einstein, which only earns him a reputation as a “pseudo-Dostoyevsky”, though. With Viktor, the draft board wonder whether he’s under their jurisdiction at all (“Boy or girl?”) and then vote – much to the annoyance of some bigwigs – for alternative service. This is where the story takes an incredibly funny turn, because he is assigned to the woman veterans’ dance company “Sudarushka”. However, Lyosha, a solitaire and determined opponent of the Ukraine war, and Johnny, professional protester with a remarkable rhetorical talent, are denied this kind of kitsch ending.

And yet we may raise our hopes along with them and this film – despite the basic bitterness provoked by all this: because anyone who imagined that political repression makes us braindead and mute is taught better by Chistova’s unsubdued look behind the scenes of collective opinion and mood making.

Barbara Wurm



MDR Film Prize 2016

Extended Reality: DOK Neuland 2017 Interactive Project
Deep Inside Ksenia Diodorova, Aleksei Poleukhin

This web documentary reveals what’s supposed to be hidden from the eyes of society. 1,030 people are “held in safe custody” in one of Russia’s biggest secure mental hospitals.

2017

Deep Inside

(none)
Russia
2017
30 minutes
subtitles: 
(none)

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Ksenia Diodorova, Aleksei Poleukhin
Dima Belyanin
Ksenia Diodorova, Zoya Smirnova, Katia Farutina
Ksenia Diodorova, Alena Zakharets, Yana Pitenko
Yulia Alekseeva, Yana Pitenko
Zoya Smirnova
Katia Farutina, Aleksei Poleukhin
This web documentary reveals what’s supposed to be hidden from the eyes of society. 1,030 people are “held in safe custody” in one of Russia’s biggest secure mental hospitals in Peterhof near St. Petersburg – locked away and isolated from the outside world. Interviews with employees and patients offer intimate insights into the lives of the “invisible people”, which follow a different rhythm. Time passes, flowing like the tracking shot through the seemingly endless corridors of the institute. The audience decide whether they walk past the rooms, look into them or “enter” at last to meet the residents.

Die Trasse

Documentary Film
Czech Republic,
Germany,
Russia
2013
121 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Natalia Manskaya, Filip Remunda, Vít Klusák, Simone Baumann
Vitaly Mansky
Alexandra Ivanova
Pavel Mendel-Ponamarev
Vitaly Mansky
Dmitry Nazarov
It was – as the “IG Erdgastrasse” (IG Natural Gas Pipeline) claims on a website still designed in the German-Soviet friendship style – the “construction of the century”. It started with the ground-breaking ceremony on 6 June 1966 in near-arctic West Siberia, took on real transcontinental form in the pre-Perestroika years (to Reagan’s horror) and today supplies, among other things, the raw material for one of the major ritual events in Western Europe: the Rheingas-fuelled Rose Monday Parade in Cologne. The “Urengoy-Pomary-Uzhgorod Pipeline” stretches from the Yamalo-Nenets Autonomous Okrug to the Gulf of Biscay, as unnoticeable as everything else to do with our energy supply. But in terms of geo-politics, -ecologics and -economics, it’s a massive goldmine – with quite noticeable consequences (dependencies, blind faith in technology, environmental damage).
Vitaly Mansky, who last travelled through Cuba in “Motherland or Death”, now explores our own unfamiliar home along this subterranean trail. The politically obstinate documentary maestro is interested in the lives of those who live near and above the pipeline, though not necessarily off it (no money, no gas): indigenous ice fishers, Orthodox Church processions, Putin-supporting tuba players, Gorbachev-critical veterans, angry Roma, cursing Polish men and Virgin Mary-adoring Polish women. He flirts with stereotypes while adroitly avoiding them. Big screen cinema, visually powerful and with great sound design.

Barbara Wurm



MDR Film Prize 2013

Homage Marina Razbezhkina 2016
Dormition Marina Razbezhkina

Time stands still in Tatarstan. The last traces of the USSR are crumbling. A flag is taken down before it falls (apart) on its own: “Glory to the Great October”.

Dormition

Documentary Film
Russia
1991
30 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Studio Sovremennik
Marina Razbezhkina
Sergey Litovets
Marina Razbezhkina
Time stands still in Tatarstan. The last traces of the USSR are crumbling. A flag is taken down before it falls (apart) on its own: “Glory to the Great October”. Which century do the inmates of the psychiatric hospital come from? A never nostalgic lament, a crazy requiem.

Barbara Wurm
International Programme 2018
Dramatic and Mild Nastia Korkia

The arrangement: muscle man, Kandinsky, curious people. They all meet here in the smallest imaginable space, mingling in a situation that’s abstract on the one hand but very corporeal on the other.

Dramatic and Mild

Documentary Film
Russia
2018
6 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Anastasiya Olesik, Sergey Kondryakov
Nastia Korkia
Sergey Amirdzhanov
Tatyana Vikhreva
Nastia Korkia
Yelena Petrosyan
Like an action figure in a doll’s house: the impressive security officer makes his pectorals twitch in turn, the walkie-talkie skips to the rhythm. He keeps watch in a comfortably furnished box mounted on stilts in an industrial building. It contains: a painting by Wassily Kandinsky! The visitors’ queue winds up to the box, everybody wants to see the artwork, be on intimate terms with this treasure. A few square metres of complete concentration.

Carolin Weidner
Homage Marina Razbezhkina 2016
End of the Road Marina Razbezhkina

Russia, the provinces, a sci-fi swamp (echoes of Stalker). On the radio: the coup against Gorbachev. But Moscow is far away. The people stay calm. There aren’t many left.

End of the Road

Documentary Film
Russia
1991
36 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Studio Sovremennik
Marina Razbezhkina
Sergey Litovets
Marina Razbezhkina
Russia, the provinces, a sci-fi swamp (echoes of Stalker). On the radio: the coup against Gorbachev. But Moscow is far away. The people stay calm. There aren’t many left. The rails on which the steam trains once carried the revolution to the Mari ASSR lead nowhere today. A masterpiece – and experimental to boot.

Barbara Wurm

Festivaltrailer

(none)
Russia
2016
1 minute

Film for Carlos

Documentary Film
Russia
2017
31 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Renato Borrayo Serrano, Marina Razbezhkina
Renato Borrayo Serrano
Renato Borrayo Serrano
Renato Borrayo Serrano
Renato Borrayo Serrano
Renato Borrayo Serrano
What’s the worst thing that could happen to a jubilant young father? A visit from the in-laws. What’s worse, they are citizens of Mother Russia, while the filmmaker father’s native language is Spanish, which means that the baby isn’t named Alyosha but, exactly, Carlos. It’s for him, “Carlushka”, that he wanted to record this hilarious and painful new family constellation unfolding between national chauvinism and loving, well-worn marital arguments, the director says. Sharp tongues, skilfully edited.

Barbara Wurm



Honorary Mention in the International Competition Short Documentary and Animated Film

Best of MDR 2012
Geboren in der Sowjetunion. Neun Leben 1983-2011 Sergey Miroshnichenko

New episodes of the world-famous long-term observation that started to record the lives of nine children from the former Soviet Union 28 years ago – growing up in troubled times.

Geboren in der Sowjetunion. Neun Leben 1983-2011

Documentary Film
Germany,
Russia,
UK
2011
104 minutes

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Sergey Miroshnichenko (Studio "Ostrov"), Jemma Jupp (ITV Ltd.), Simone Baumann (Saxonia), Katja Wildermuth (MDR)
Sergey Miroshnichenko
Ilya Demutsky
Vyacheslav Sachkov, Juriy Ermolin
Sergey Miroshnichenko
The Russian long-term observation “Born in the USSR” is known worldwide for having followed the chequered lives of nine children born in the Soviet era for 28 years. Emmy award winner Sergey Miroshnichenko creates fascinating insights into the worlds of his protagonists who have now grown up in quite a different value system. Take nine ordinary seven-year-olds and change their whole environment. Put their parents’ values upside down and exchange them for the norms and values of the society they will grow up in. Add puberty and hormones at the age of 14, followed by military service, financial difficulties and the onset of adult responsibilities at 21. Then wait seven years. “Born in the USSR” portrays very different people from Russia, Central Asia, the Baltic States and the Caucasus. It’s more than a film about life in the post-Soviet era, more even than a collection of biographies. It is always a very universal film about growing up, about dreams and hopes, realities and disappointments and the big question of what life holds in store for each of us.

Production note
Kids DOK 2016
Hamlet. Comedy. Yevgeniy Fadeyev

It’s Hamlet on stage, but the real performance is happening two rows in front of us. An unruly group of boys and girls are clowning around in the exciting, almost safe semi-darkness of the auditorium.

Hamlet. Comedy.

Animated Film
Russia
2016
5 minutes
subtitles: 
_without dialogue / subtitles

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Lyubov Gaydukova
Yevgeniy Fadeyev
Yevgeniy Fadeyev
Yevgeniy Fadeyev
Liza Astretsova, Alexander Krivolutskaya, Alexandra Serdyukova, Rozalina Zinurova, Vera Vyugina, Yilia Elizaveta Astretsova, Aleksandra Krivolutskaya; Aleksandra Serdyukova, Rozalina Zinurova, Vera Vyugina, Yuliya Kuzmanina, Yekaterina Antonenko, Tatyana Feklistova
Yevgeniy Fadeyev
Nikolay Khitruk
The children are supposed to watch a play, but they can think of funnier things to do. And in the end the teacher’s bun is on fire.


Nominated for mephisto 97.6 Audience Award
International Programme 2017
Harmony Lidia Sheinin

Grandmother needs nursing now and so five of the younger family members take command. A film about being old, a child, a mother and about sad farewells – to things, to life.

Harmony

Documentary Film
Russia
2017
62 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Lidia Sheinin
Lidia Sheinin
Lidia Sheinin
Lidia Sheinin
Lidia Sheinin, Makar Akhpashev, Andrey Fonin, Pavel Doreuli
It’s difficult to decide whether one should resent the slightly-built grandma for being grumpy. Her granddaughter is moving in to cook and care for her. But she is trailing four little children who brazenly hog the tiny average Soviet-era flat, crawl under their great-grandmother’s feet, leave crumbs everywhere and vividly demonstrate the modern school of educational methods. Babushka becomes a stranger in her own home. She tidies and mops up (after them) – it’s a miracle she never stumbles over the stretched woollen threads and diapered bottoms that are everywhere –, she whines and scolds. But the tears only start to flow when her beloved piano is to be “liquidated”, as she puts it …

Lidia Sheinin captures the emotional oscillations in this daily family chaos with a sure sense of closeness and distance. She surveys generations and attitudes in the smallest spaces, studies characters and relationships – and creates, in the midst of this frenzy, almost infinite zones of reflection about what ties us to each other.

Barbara Wurm


Nominated for MDR Film Prize