Film Archive

Jahr

Next Masters Wettbewerb 2017
Farewell Essay Macarena Albalustri

An intimate film essay about the death of one’s mother and the development of personal forms of mourning everyone has to find/invent for themselves to cope with painful losses.

Farewell Essay

Documentary Film
Argentina
2016
79 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Macarena Albalustri, Tomás Dotta
Macarena Albalustri
Odín Schwartz
Tebbe Schöningh
Iara Rodríguez Vilardebó
Macarena Albalustri, Tomás Dotta
Sofía Straface, Lucas Larriera
Conversations in a veterinarian’s waiting room: Liza, director Macarena Albalustri’s over-ten-year-old cat, doesn’t eat any more. The imminent death of a beloved pet evokes memories of another loss, that of her mother, who died ten years ago and whom Albalustri hardly remembers. As she is coping with the grief over her cat, buried feelings and questions are uncovered again, an emotional search begins. Using photos, letters and objects from her childhood, the director tries to re-awaken memories – in herself and in others. She talks to persons who were close to her mother, to the latter’s friends and her father. She even manages to find the psychotherapist consulted by her mother at the time. The conversations are always about coping with loss, dying and one’s own death. It’s a very intimate film essay about saying farewell, about developing rituals and personal forms of mourning which everyone has to find and invent for themselves to deal with the pain of farewell.

Frederik Lang

Project 55

Documentary Film
Argentina
2017
73 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Miguel Colombo
Miguel Colombo
Miguel Rivarola
Alejandra Almirón, Miguel Colombo
Miguel Colombo
Jorge Gutiérrez Jiménez
A historic Argentinean event, the bombing of the Plaza de Mayo in Buenos Aires by the military in a coup d’état on 16 June 1955, is haunting a filmmaker’s nightmares, though he was only born in 1978. As if the ghosts of national history had recruited him, who never saw a war in his life: as a medium to work through this trauma. He and some colleagues initiate a project of audiovisual basic research. How can one translate and communicate the experience of war at all? Or, in other words: is history a stream or a pile? The film discourse of “Project 55” seems like the slow fabrication of thoughts by talking or filming. And if this reminds anyone of Heinrich von Kleist it’s neither coincidental nor intentional but inevitable. The journey of this film goes from Buenos Aires via Vietnam and nuclear arms tests back to family history – or rather that part of history that is yet to be written by future generations.

Sounds rather cerebral? Certainly! But whoever started the rumour that films should be made from the hip? There is some sense in every sensuality – and not just in the words.

Ralph Eue