Film Archive

International Programme 2014
Focus on Infinity Joerg Burger

Reflections on infinity: physicists, theologians and philosophers, unreal places, immense facilities, complex technologies and theories, a sense of humour and infinite space.

Focus on Infinity

Documentary Film
Austria
2014
80 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Joerg Burger, Ralph Wieser, Georg Misch
Joerg Burger
Joerg Burger
Gökce Ince
Joerg Burger
Hjalti Bager-Jonathansson, Sebastian Brameshuber
“Eternity is a long time, especially towards the end”, Woody Allen once said. The fact that none other than this urban neurotic is quoted in a film marked by infinite landscapes, giant architecture and the most complex technologies has a lot to do with the interview partners – especially the female ones – Joerg Burger finds on his cinematic exploration with its “Focus on Infinity”. They are not only among the probably most intelligent and farsighted minds on our planet, they also have a sense of humour – and an inner calm (often based on physical-astronomic knowledge) as they contemplate human life.
Contemplation and meticulousness, perfectionism and modesty – perhaps these are the qualities that are needed for their sheer infinite drive to search for knowledge (or in other words: the fundamental questions of existence). Researchers and theologians, scientists and philosophers, empiricists and theorists share this realm of infinity. The film follows them on trips into a universe located at the intersection of perception, thinking and imagination and sharpens our eye to the tiniest details of the biggest picture. A gem, a masterpiece.
Barbara Wurm

Ulrich Seidl und die bösen Buben

Documentary Film
Austria,
Germany,
Switzerland
2014
52 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Johannes Rosenberger, Christian Beetz, Werner Schweizer
Constantin Wulff
Johannes Hammel
Dieter Pichler
A portrait of director Ulrich Seidl, who tends to be labelled a maniac and social pornographer (and more besides) and whom everybody thinks they know before they’ve even seen a single one of his films. Constantin Wulff gives us a first glimpse of the Austrian filmmaker at work. The much-discussed “Seidl method” is directly and vividly demonstrated here – and you can’t help but be amazed, because this method seems to be so different from what one had imagined.
Seidl is one thing first and foremost: a highly focused and precise visual worker. Patiently Wulff observes the director during the shooting of his new film “In the Basement” and during rehearsals for his theatre production “Bad Boys/Hideous Men”. Combining these with extensive interviews and excerpts of former films, this portrait reveals a complex and exceptional artist.
What it also shows: how much Seidl’s whole creative work is a quest in which he is guided by real circumstances as well as by his own visions and demons.
Ralph Eue