Film Archive

Next Masters Wettbewerb
#uploading_holocaust Sagi Bornstein, Udi Nir

Young Israelis performing a rite of initiation, the “Journey to Poland”: seven days, three mass graves, four concentration camps, and cameras running all the time. An exercise in identity made up of YouTube videos – horror 2.0.

#uploading_holocaust

Documentary Film
Austria,
Germany,
Israel
2016
75 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Gebrüder Beetz Filmproduktion, udiVsagi production
Sagi Bornstein, Udi Nir
Uri Agnon
Sagi Bornstein, Gal Goffer
Aviv Aldema
It’s like an initiation ritual. Every year 25,000 Israeli pupils and students go on a trip to Poland, visiting four concentration camps, three mass graves and two ghettos in seven days. It’s a journey to the dead, their roots, and themselves: as Jews and citizens of Israel. They document everything on their smartphones: hotel rooms, barracks, shooting ranges, themselves, their friends. The material shared on YouTube is the basis of this film – and it’s revealing. The two Israeli directors Sagi Bornstein and Udi Nir set contemporary recordings against videotapes from the 1980s. How will the memory change when there are no more contemporary witnesses? What can the crumbling sites still reveal? When will the rituals become hollow?

The Holocaust is the narrative of Israel, the constituent element of the state, even more than Zionism. That’s what the young people are taught to believe. The concept is historical imagination and immersion. They are supposed to feel the squeeze of the cattle wagons, the hardness of the narrow pallets and the oppression of the gas chambers. Horror 2.0. The video material also shows, however, how much smarter the young people are. There are no stupid questions, documentary filmmaker Marcel Ophüls once said, only stupid answers.

Cornelia Klauß


Nominated for Young Eyes Film Award

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

International Programme
Cinema Futures Michael Palm

Cinema’s leap into the digital age and vanquishing of the analogue – a promise of salvation. An opulent essay about the visions and losses brought by a dubious departure.

Cinema Futures

Documentary Film
Austria
2016
126 minutes
subtitles: 
German
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Ralph Wieser
Michael Palm
Michael Palm
Joerg Burger
Michael Palm
Michael Palm
Hjalti Bager-Jonathansson
The “digital revolution” reached cinema at a fairly late date. It was almost universally regarded as a cause of joy since people believed its promise that it would make everything better, bigger, more beautiful and, above all, easier. To compound matters, this revolution was staged, celebrated and economically enforced as the greatest technological advance since the arrival of sound film. Who wanted to be left behind as an eternal reactionary or dull fault-finder in this heady air of departure?

From a distance of several years, “Cinema Futures” now explores the field between the specific cultural technique of analogue film and the promise of salvation brought by the alleged eternal life of bits and bytes. On one side there is the vision of the digital age as the final victory over transience. On the other side there is the threatening idea that our present is needlessly turned into a “dark age” not much of which will survive. Because, firstly, film as a physical object and, secondly, cinema as a techno-social infrastructure have become obsolete and, thirdly, no man and no machine will be able to read the howsoever “immortal” data.

Ralph Eue


Nominated for Healthy Workplaces Film Award

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

International Programme
Exomoon Gudrun Krebitz

A girl about to become a woman talks to the moon and a statue of the Virgin Mary. Out of the raging emptiness of her loneliness she begs for something to happen – terrible and bloody things.

Exomoon

Animated Film
Austria
2016
6 minutes
subtitles: 
No
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Gudrun Krebitz
Gudrun Krebitz
Marian Mentrup
Gudrun Krebitz
Gudrun Krebitz
Gudrun Krebitz
A girl about to become a woman talks to the moon and a statue of the Virgin Mary. Out of the raging emptiness of her loneliness she begs for something to happen – terrible and bloody things. Whispered words of a protagonist who practices a somnambulistic kind of self-empowerment through her phantasms, always following her hot and cold desire – sometimes in a dialogue, sometimes a monologue. Crayon, pencil and colour in different textures make us sense the inner tension which also resonates in the soundtrack and music.

Nadja Rademacher


Nominated for mephisto 97.6 Audience Award

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

International Programme
Future Baby Maria Arlamovsky

The bespoke baby: labs, sperm and embryo storage facilities the size of factory floors. Quasi-industrial child production: technology, ethics and a lucrative business. A horror film.

Future Baby

Documentary Film
Austria
2016
91 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
NGF Nikolaus Geyrhalter Filmproduktion
Maria Arlamovsky
Vincent Pongracz, Alana Newman
Sebastian Arlamovsky
Natalie Schwager
Maria Arlamovsky
Sergey Martynyuk, Johannes Winkler
Boy or girl? Blue eyes or brown? A future Olympic champion or a literature Nobel Prize laureate? It goes without saying that the child should be completely flawless – no superfluous fat or hereditary diseases.

Maria Arlamovsky wants to explore what reproductive medicine can do and – above all – how far we are willing to go. So she travels around the world, which in this case makes sense because nowadays the individual components of a human being are generated, even produced, on different continents and more or less mechanically assembled somewhere else. She visits laboratories and posh clinics, sperm and embryo storage facilities the size of factory halls, and Third World hospitals in which surrogate mothers bear children for the First World. She talks to them as well as to those who employ them – because they can – and to representatives of medicine, philosophy, bioethics or biotechnology. Without emotionalisation the film adds up monstrosities that from a different angle are seen as progress and freedom. She allows us to take a sober scientist’s look into Pandora’s Box. It’s smooth and beautiful, the images suggest. While the text sets traps for those who think they are in a position to pass moral judgements. A horror film.

Grit Lemke

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Outer Space

Animated Film
Austria
1999
10 minutes
subtitles: 
_without dialogue / subtitles
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Peter Tscherkassky (P.O.E.T. Picture Production)
Peter Tscherkassky
Peter Tscherkassky
Peter Tscherkassky
Peter Tscherkassky
Peter Tscherkassky
Peter Tscherkassky
A woman who seems to be alone in a strange house. In this re-working of a 1980s B-movie, Peter Tscherkassky lets the rooms speak. Using an elaborate contact printing process he superimposes up to five original shots. The physical space becomes a mind space.

Ines Seifert

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

International Programme
Paradies! Paradies! Kurdwin Ayub

Accompanying your Kurdish father on a family visit to Iraq: flat hunting and front line tourism outside the gates of ISIS. A young Viennese artist with a sense of tragicomedy explores cultural rifts.

Paradies! Paradies!

Documentary Film
Austria
2015
78 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Rudolf Takacs, Lixi Frank
Kurdwin Ayub
Kurdwin Ayub
Nooran Talebi
Rudolf Pototschnig
The plane that takes Kurdwin and her father Omar to their Kurdish relatives is almost empty. After all, who wants to fly to northern Iraq these days? Omar has built a successful medical practice in Vienna. Kurdwin grew up in Austria and views this visit “home” with a critical eye anyway. With her camera she tries to fathom why her father gets euphoric at the mere mention of the word Kurdistan and insists on buying a second home in a place that’s only a stone’s throw from ISIS territory. A de facto building boom has started despite all the conflicts. Omar, too, wants to invest in a utopian future, maybe driven by defiance of the Viennese revenue office, maybe by homesickness or a newly awakened patriotism. Contrary to all sense of reality he displays an unrelenting optimism in front of his daughter’s camera which, after some all too obvious failures in the real estate issue, he can still redirect to a tourist honour visit to the frontline.

Kurdwin Ayub pushes the boundaries of the home movie with an instinct for tragicomic situations, exploring the intercultural rift in her family from inside. She plays with predetermined role patterns before and behind the camera, provokes by acting the naive young girl while her father plays the Molieresque hero – all of which gives the film a performative as well as situative character.

Lars Meyer


Nominated for Young Eyes Film Award

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Next Masters Wettbewerb
Seeing Voices Dariusz Kowalski

How do you experience the world without a sense of hearing? A couple must take decisions for their children, young people prepare for jobs, the daily life of a politician – to be experienced visually.

Seeing Voices

Documentary Film
Austria
2016
93 minutes
subtitles: 
English
German
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Oliver Neumann, Sabine Moser
Dariusz Kowalski
Martin Putz
Dieter Pichler
Atanas Tcholakov, David Almeida Ribeiro, Stefan Rosensprung, Tong Zhang, Klaus Kellermann
Eleven years ago Austrian Sign Language was constitutionally recognised as an “independent language”. But the country still has a long way to go to a barrier-free and thus inclusive life for the deaf. That goes for a simple visit to the doctor’s as well as for attending school.

“Seeing Voices” shows a world that’s often invisible to those who can hear – if only because there’s more sign than spoken language in this film. Intense images, informative and entertaining, make us sensible of different situations in life for which the deaf must develop special communication strategies. How do you communicate at a dancing class? What role does the hearing child of a deaf couple play? And what does the life of a deaf politician look like? One of the most memorable narrative strands follows a professional orientation class for the deaf and later shows one of the participants at a practical course in a tailor’s shop. Fear and the shame at not always being able to communicate are clearly mingled with enjoyment of the thing itself and a very special sense of humour. The film shows very clearly how important the formation of an identity is for these young people, in addition to learning professional skills. Sign language is the key to this. It’s worth paying attention to. Especially as a visual experience on screen.

Lars Meyer

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Self

Animated Film
Austria
2015
8 minutes
subtitles: 
_without dialogue / subtitles
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Claudia Larcher
Claudia Larcher
Claudia Larcher
Claudia Larcher
Constantin Popp
Nothing is closer to us than our skin, artfully enveloping our self with its beautiful and less beautiful parts, defining the boundary between us and everything else. A serene camera pan past naked body parts. A tour of discovery leading from a shining hill to a rounded ledge down to a shady chasm. A neck. A leg…chest. A belly…ear. A fellybear? Claudia Larcher assembles photos, video clips and sounds into an equally compelling and irritating body collage.

André Eckardt


Nominated for mephisto 97.6 Audience Award

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.