Film Archive

International Programme 2016
Cinema Futures Michael Palm

Cinema’s leap into the digital age and vanquishing of the analogue – a promise of salvation. An opulent essay about the visions and losses brought by a dubious departure.

Cinema Futures

Documentary Film
Austria
2016
126 minutes
subtitles: 
German

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Ralph Wieser
Michael Palm
Michael Palm
Joerg Burger
Michael Palm
Michael Palm
Hjalti Bager-Jonathansson
The “digital revolution” reached cinema at a fairly late date. It was almost universally regarded as a cause of joy since people believed its promise that it would make everything better, bigger, more beautiful and, above all, easier. To compound matters, this revolution was staged, celebrated and economically enforced as the greatest technological advance since the arrival of sound film. Who wanted to be left behind as an eternal reactionary or dull fault-finder in this heady air of departure?

From a distance of several years, “Cinema Futures” now explores the field between the specific cultural technique of analogue film and the promise of salvation brought by the alleged eternal life of bits and bytes. On one side there is the vision of the digital age as the final victory over transience. On the other side there is the threatening idea that our present is needlessly turned into a “dark age” not much of which will survive. Because, firstly, film as a physical object and, secondly, cinema as a techno-social infrastructure have become obsolete and, thirdly, no man and no machine will be able to read the howsoever “immortal” data.

Ralph Eue


Nominated for Healthy Workplaces Film Award
International Programme 2016
Exomoon Gudrun Krebitz

A girl about to become a woman talks to the moon and a statue of the Virgin Mary. Out of the raging emptiness of her loneliness she begs for something to happen – terrible and bloody things.

Exomoon

Animated Film
Austria
2016
6 minutes
subtitles: 
No

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Gudrun Krebitz
Gudrun Krebitz
Marian Mentrup
Gudrun Krebitz
Gudrun Krebitz
Gudrun Krebitz
A girl about to become a woman talks to the moon and a statue of the Virgin Mary. Out of the raging emptiness of her loneliness she begs for something to happen – terrible and bloody things. Whispered words of a protagonist who practices a somnambulistic kind of self-empowerment through her phantasms, always following her hot and cold desire – sometimes in a dialogue, sometimes a monologue. Crayon, pencil and colour in different textures make us sense the inner tension which also resonates in the soundtrack and music.

Nadja Rademacher


Nominated for mephisto 97.6 Audience Award
International Programme 2016
Future Baby Maria Arlamovsky

The bespoke baby: labs, sperm and embryo storage facilities the size of factory floors. Quasi-industrial child production: technology, ethics and a lucrative business. A horror film.

Future Baby

Documentary Film
Austria
2016
91 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

NGF Nikolaus Geyrhalter Filmproduktion
Maria Arlamovsky
Vincent Pongracz, Alana Newman
Sebastian Arlamovsky
Natalie Schwager
Maria Arlamovsky
Sergey Martynyuk, Johannes Winkler
Boy or girl? Blue eyes or brown? A future Olympic champion or a literature Nobel Prize laureate? It goes without saying that the child should be completely flawless – no superfluous fat or hereditary diseases.

Maria Arlamovsky wants to explore what reproductive medicine can do and – above all – how far we are willing to go. So she travels around the world, which in this case makes sense because nowadays the individual components of a human being are generated, even produced, on different continents and more or less mechanically assembled somewhere else. She visits laboratories and posh clinics, sperm and embryo storage facilities the size of factory halls, and Third World hospitals in which surrogate mothers bear children for the First World. She talks to them as well as to those who employ them – because they can – and to representatives of medicine, philosophy, bioethics or biotechnology. Without emotionalisation the film adds up monstrosities that from a different angle are seen as progress and freedom. She allows us to take a sober scientist’s look into Pandora’s Box. It’s smooth and beautiful, the images suggest. While the text sets traps for those who think they are in a position to pass moral judgements. A horror film.

Grit Lemke
International Programme 2016
Paradies! Paradies! Kurdwin Ayub

Accompanying your Kurdish father on a family visit to Iraq: flat hunting and front line tourism outside the gates of ISIS. A young Viennese artist with a sense of tragicomedy explores cultural rifts.

Paradies! Paradies!

Documentary Film
Austria
2015
78 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Rudolf Takacs, Lixi Frank
Kurdwin Ayub
Kurdwin Ayub
Nooran Talebi
Rudolf Pototschnig
The plane that takes Kurdwin and her father Omar to their Kurdish relatives is almost empty. After all, who wants to fly to northern Iraq these days? Omar has built a successful medical practice in Vienna. Kurdwin grew up in Austria and views this visit “home” with a critical eye anyway. With her camera she tries to fathom why her father gets euphoric at the mere mention of the word Kurdistan and insists on buying a second home in a place that’s only a stone’s throw from ISIS territory. A de facto building boom has started despite all the conflicts. Omar, too, wants to invest in a utopian future, maybe driven by defiance of the Viennese revenue office, maybe by homesickness or a newly awakened patriotism. Contrary to all sense of reality he displays an unrelenting optimism in front of his daughter’s camera which, after some all too obvious failures in the real estate issue, he can still redirect to a tourist honour visit to the frontline.

Kurdwin Ayub pushes the boundaries of the home movie with an instinct for tragicomic situations, exploring the intercultural rift in her family from inside. She plays with predetermined role patterns before and behind the camera, provokes by acting the naive young girl while her father plays the Molieresque hero – all of which gives the film a performative as well as situative character.

Lars Meyer


Nominated for Young Eyes Film Award