Film Archive

Bianca läuft …

Documentary Film
Austria,
Germany
2013
83 minutes
subtitles: 
No

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Tina Bara
Tina Bara
Bianca Maria Samer
Tina Bara
Tina Bara, Oliver Brodt
Tina Bara
Tina Bara, Oliver Brodt
Bianca, a young woman living in the Austrian province of Burgenland, is a mystery. She is a passionate runner, but when she walks her legs fail. She is a highly talented painter, who keeps sketching photorealistic images of herself that show her pierced, nailed, cut, in flowing robes, or tied to her running shoes. She talks about her diseases, the collapses happening at shorter and shorter intervals, and her passion for collecting dead animals, always with a smile on her ageless face.
The photographer and filmmaker Tina Bara respects her protagonist’s cocoon. She lets the paintings speak, which show cruel signs of self-destruction and self-hatred, screaming out for someone to probe the causes of this. At the same time, “Bianca Is Running” is a very quiet film whose strength lies in uncertainty. The director turns this cautious, gradual approach and her own doubts into the dramatic principle of her debut film, creating a structure that is open to interpretation. The encounters with Bianca take us into uncertain territory – neither she nor the film offer any footholds.

Cornelia Klauß
International Programme 2016
Cinema Futures Michael Palm

Cinema’s leap into the digital age and vanquishing of the analogue – a promise of salvation. An opulent essay about the visions and losses brought by a dubious departure.

Cinema Futures

Documentary Film
Austria
2016
126 minutes
subtitles: 
German

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Ralph Wieser
Michael Palm
Michael Palm
Joerg Burger
Michael Palm
Michael Palm
Hjalti Bager-Jonathansson
The “digital revolution” reached cinema at a fairly late date. It was almost universally regarded as a cause of joy since people believed its promise that it would make everything better, bigger, more beautiful and, above all, easier. To compound matters, this revolution was staged, celebrated and economically enforced as the greatest technological advance since the arrival of sound film. Who wanted to be left behind as an eternal reactionary or dull fault-finder in this heady air of departure?

From a distance of several years, “Cinema Futures” now explores the field between the specific cultural technique of analogue film and the promise of salvation brought by the alleged eternal life of bits and bytes. On one side there is the vision of the digital age as the final victory over transience. On the other side there is the threatening idea that our present is needlessly turned into a “dark age” not much of which will survive. Because, firstly, film as a physical object and, secondly, cinema as a techno-social infrastructure have become obsolete and, thirdly, no man and no machine will be able to read the howsoever “immortal” data.

Ralph Eue


Nominated for Healthy Workplaces Film Award

Das Fieber

Documentary Film
Austria,
Germany,
Switzerland
2019
99 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Markus Wailand
Katharina Weingartner
Siri Klug
Andrea Wagner
Toby Cornish
Katharina Weingartner
Patrick Becker, Peter Braeker
The fight won’t end. Malaria still rules large parts of Africa. Every 60 seconds a child south of the Sahara dies of the disease. All in all, it causes around half a million deaths per year. But why is it so impossible to successfully conquer the disease, even though countless relief organisations have been working on a solution for many years?

The reason, of course, is money, global conflicts of interest, the powerful pharmaceutical industry. That’s nothing new. But the Austrian filmmaker Katharina Weingartner produced an enthralling documentary thriller which literally inscribes exciting, context-shifting and -widening lines of connection into the more or less familiar general picture: connections between the parasite and the pharmaceutical industry, between self-determination in East Africa and the richest man in the world. The focus is on three courageous people in Uganda and Kenya who are fighting the disease on the spot and are often more successful with alternative methods than Western medicine is comfortable with. Because after all a solution of their own, without foreign help and technology, without the mercantile and public philanthropic interests of the helpers, would mean independence.

Julia Weigl
International Programme 2012
Der Prozess Gerald Igor Hauzenberger

The biggest criminal case in Austria, where harmless animal rights activists were accused and convicted of being enemies of the state. A Kafkaesque swan song for Western democracy.

Der Prozess

Documentary Film
Austria
2012
112 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Michael Seeber, Gerald Igor Hauzenberger, framelab filmproduktion
Gerald Igor Hauzenberger
Bernhard Fleischmann
Dominik Spritzendorfer, Gerald Igor Hauzenberger
Michael Palm
Chris Moser
Gerald Igor Hauzenberger
Michael Palm
Igor Hauzenberger’s film is extremely disturbing. When, in the name of article 278a, which was adopted to fight organisations like the Mafia and Al Qaeda, a protest letter is turned into a threat, an animal rights activist into an enemy of the state, and an NGO into a terrorist organisation, the pillars of our civil society are beginning to totter alarmingly. Thirteen animal rights activists are facing trial in Vienna because they staged some high-profile protests against factory farming and fur trading in front of stables and department stores. Sure, naked protesters in the Viennese city in the middle of winter, carrying dead animals or, covered in blood, crucified pigs’ heads through the streets, are not a pleasant sight. It’s also annoying that this Association against Factory Farming (VGT) is not simply a gang of losers but an international network among whose leaders are scientists and green politicians, including the charismatic Dr. Dr. Martin Balluch who chose the way of the street after a university career. Igor Hauzenberger follows the protesters over several years, tries to shed some light on the legal jungle and persistently tries to get public attorneys, press officers and department store operators in front of his camera. In vain. This biggest criminal case in Austria yet is turning into a test case: democracy versus those who are not averse to shouting “we need Hitler back” occasionally.
– Cornelia Klauß

Die Telefonbuchpolka

Animated Film
Austria
2013
5 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Benjamin Swiczinsky, Iris Haschek, Golli Marboe, Johannes Schiehsl, Conrad Tambour
Benjamin Swiczinsky
Georg Kreisler
Benjamin Swiczinsky
Benjamin Swiczinsky
Benjamin Swiczinsky, Julia Ocker, Daniel Lundquist, Timur Tietze, Johannes Schiehsl, Conrad Tambour, Nana Swiczinsky
Benjamin Swiczinsky
Benjamin Swiczinsky, Johannes Schiehsl
“When I look for inspiration or an entry into high society, I read the phone book …” Austrian-American songwriter and comedian Georg Kreisler’s cult song as an animated music video.
International Programme 2013
Elektro Moskva Dominik Spritzendorfer, Elena Tikhonova

Electrification + communism = psychedelic sounds. The miracles of electronic music on homemade instruments in the Soviet Union: tanks to synthesizers – forward, soldering irons!

Elektro Moskva

Documentary Film
Austria
2013
89 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Dominik Spritzendorfer
Dominik Spritzendorfer, Elena Tikhonova
Stanislav Kreichi, Vyacheslav Mescherin, Richardas Norvila, Alexey Borisov
Dominik Spritzendorfer
Michael Palm
Dominik Spritzendorfer, Elena Tikhonova
Yuri Klevanski
In 1919, Lev Termen aka Léon Theremin invented an electronic musical instrument played without touching it, by moving one’s hands very precisely in an electrostatic field between two antennae. It looks like magic, it sounds like magic. When the inventor himself speaks up in a 1973 interview, though, you realise that many of the electronic miracles of music were nothing but by-products of the military industry. “Elektro Moskva” is an essay about the Soviet history of electrification, the unshakeable belief in technological progress and the oddities created in the process. Rare archive material is juxtaposed with contemporary observations that not only enable us to look into the junk rooms of passionate instrument collectors but also to be present when the musician Richardas Norvilla, better known as Benzo, philosophises about the space sounds produced by his synthesizer, which he claims are as unpredictable as life in Russia, where listening to the Rolling Stones was once banned. Though nobody is likely to miss them amid these psychedelic sounds.

Claudia Lehmann
International Programme 2016
Exomoon Gudrun Krebitz

A girl about to become a woman talks to the moon and a statue of the Virgin Mary. Out of the raging emptiness of her loneliness she begs for something to happen – terrible and bloody things.

Exomoon

Animated Film
Austria
2016
6 minutes
subtitles: 
No

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Gudrun Krebitz
Gudrun Krebitz
Marian Mentrup
Gudrun Krebitz
Gudrun Krebitz
Gudrun Krebitz
A girl about to become a woman talks to the moon and a statue of the Virgin Mary. Out of the raging emptiness of her loneliness she begs for something to happen – terrible and bloody things. Whispered words of a protagonist who practices a somnambulistic kind of self-empowerment through her phantasms, always following her hot and cold desire – sometimes in a dialogue, sometimes a monologue. Crayon, pencil and colour in different textures make us sense the inner tension which also resonates in the soundtrack and music.

Nadja Rademacher


Nominated for mephisto 97.6 Audience Award
International Programme 2014
Focus on Infinity Joerg Burger

Reflections on infinity: physicists, theologians and philosophers, unreal places, immense facilities, complex technologies and theories, a sense of humour and infinite space.

Focus on Infinity

Documentary Film
Austria
2014
80 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Joerg Burger, Ralph Wieser, Georg Misch
Joerg Burger
Joerg Burger
Gökce Ince
Joerg Burger
Hjalti Bager-Jonathansson, Sebastian Brameshuber
“Eternity is a long time, especially towards the end”, Woody Allen once said. The fact that none other than this urban neurotic is quoted in a film marked by infinite landscapes, giant architecture and the most complex technologies has a lot to do with the interview partners – especially the female ones – Joerg Burger finds on his cinematic exploration with its “Focus on Infinity”. They are not only among the probably most intelligent and farsighted minds on our planet, they also have a sense of humour – and an inner calm (often based on physical-astronomic knowledge) as they contemplate human life.
Contemplation and meticulousness, perfectionism and modesty – perhaps these are the qualities that are needed for their sheer infinite drive to search for knowledge (or in other words: the fundamental questions of existence). Researchers and theologians, scientists and philosophers, empiricists and theorists share this realm of infinity. The film follows them on trips into a universe located at the intersection of perception, thinking and imagination and sharpens our eye to the tiniest details of the biggest picture. A gem, a masterpiece.
Barbara Wurm
International Programme 2016
Future Baby Maria Arlamovsky

The bespoke baby: labs, sperm and embryo storage facilities the size of factory floors. Quasi-industrial child production: technology, ethics and a lucrative business. A horror film.

Future Baby

Documentary Film
Austria
2016
91 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

NGF Nikolaus Geyrhalter Filmproduktion
Maria Arlamovsky
Vincent Pongracz, Alana Newman
Sebastian Arlamovsky
Natalie Schwager
Maria Arlamovsky
Sergey Martynyuk, Johannes Winkler
Boy or girl? Blue eyes or brown? A future Olympic champion or a literature Nobel Prize laureate? It goes without saying that the child should be completely flawless – no superfluous fat or hereditary diseases.

Maria Arlamovsky wants to explore what reproductive medicine can do and – above all – how far we are willing to go. So she travels around the world, which in this case makes sense because nowadays the individual components of a human being are generated, even produced, on different continents and more or less mechanically assembled somewhere else. She visits laboratories and posh clinics, sperm and embryo storage facilities the size of factory halls, and Third World hospitals in which surrogate mothers bear children for the First World. She talks to them as well as to those who employ them – because they can – and to representatives of medicine, philosophy, bioethics or biotechnology. Without emotionalisation the film adds up monstrosities that from a different angle are seen as progress and freedom. She allows us to take a sober scientist’s look into Pandora’s Box. It’s smooth and beautiful, the images suggest. While the text sets traps for those who think they are in a position to pass moral judgements. A horror film.

Grit Lemke
International Programme 2012
Mama Illegal Ed Moschitz

A long-term observation of Moldavian women, illegal and without rights, working cleaning and nursing jobs in Western Europe, and their children, who grow up without their mothers. A tragedy.

Mama Illegal

Documentary Film
Austria
2011
95 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Ed Moschitz
Gailute Miksyste
Sandra Merseburger
Alexandra Löwy
Ed Moschitz
Lenka Mikulova
Dirty clothes are scattered along the railway tracks, thrown there by those who stowed away under freight trains to escape the poverty of Moldavia. The unemployment rate is 80 percent, a third of the population have already left the country. Today it’s mostly the women who leave to work as illegal cleaners or caregivers in the West, with no health insurance and no rights. The smugglers are expensive and the risk of being caught is high, so they stay away for years. They do the jobs no one else wants to do and earn little money. But the plan doesn’t work because once abroad they change; want to live like the people whose homes they are cleaning while their children are waiting at home and the fathers are baking the bread. Ed Moschitz accompanied three of those women for seven years. This remarkably long period of time, which the film fought for, enables us to look at all angles. The children’s alienation from mothers they only know through Skype, the men’s disappointment when their wives mock their housekeeping, and the conflict of the guest workers who have no documents in the West and can’t find their way back home. The film is a passionate appeal to politicians to create a legal framework for these realities. The look at a classroom in a Moldavian village school, where almost all the children are “motherless”, ought to be motivation enough.
– Cornelia Klauß
International Programme 2017
Namrud (Troublemaker) Fernando Romero Forsthuber

The conversation between Jowan and Don, father and son, keeps turning into a Socratic slacker dialogue. A rebellious Palestinian family in Israel.

Namrud (Troublemaker)

Documentary Film
Austria
2017
94 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Jürgen Karasek
Fernando Romero Forsthuber
Jowan Safadi
Jakob Fuhr, Martin Putz, Falko Lachmund, Rabia Salfiti
Wolfgang Auer
Ari Yehudit Richter, Jürgen Karasek
Feras Shehadeh
Jowan Safadi’s 15-year-old son Don came to Israel from the US. Fernando Romero Forsthuber introduces this encounter rather abruptly with Don simply lying in his bed one morning and complaining that he has to go to the beach with his father. Nobody likes the beach after all! The friendly and aggressive verbal exchanges between father and son shape this film, though both of them like to exchange blows in other directions, too: Jowan is a musician whose songs are about the life and sufferings of a Palestinian living in Israel – provocations he searches and finds. Don has just started boxing training.

Fernando Romero Forsthuber shows two men caught between the pressure to adapt and rebellion. “I don’t feel anything real about being anything that I didn’t choose”, Jowan states at the beginning. “Including being Palestinian or being an Arab or being anything.” Jowan and Don both feel the need for self-empowerment, each in his own way. But they share the impulse to challenge, in a critical and easy-going way, all those who in their eyes submit too easily or force others to bend the knee.

Carolin Weidner

Narrating Hebron

Documentary Film
Austria,
Israel,
Palestinian territories
2017
21 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Viktoria Bayer
Viktoria Bayer
Viktoria Bayer
Viktoria Bayer
Viktoria Bayer
Viktoria Bayer
History is created by the person who tells it. And there are many different ways of telling it. Biases shift, details are left out or emphasised. In Hebron, a city in West Jordan divided into zones and inhabited by both Israelis and Palestinians, convictions about history and truth intersect with and are superimposed upon each other. The film collects the different narratives, told by Israeli and Palestinian city guides.

Carolin Weidner
International Programme 2013
Omsch Edgar Honetschläger

The director’s friendship with his 101-year-old neighbour, once a pretty young Viennese girl, now a grumpy original. An unsentimental reflection full of vim and and the typical Viennese humour known as “Schmäh”.

Omsch

Documentary Film
Austria
2013
80 minutes
subtitles: 
English
French

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Yukika Kudo
Edgar Honetschläger
Morton Feldman
Daniel Hollerweger, Hisaki Sanbongi, Edgar Honetschläger
Stefan Fauland, Edgar Honetschläger
Edgar Honetschläger, Stefan Fauland
Georg Mittermayr
“How do you like me better? In the little box or en nature?” A shrill laugh. The question is asked by Omsch, a usually cheerful, often thoughtful and rarely moody person. “Grantig”, grumpy, they call it where she lives, in Vienna. It’s obvious that she used to be a “naughty girl” and “pretty as a picture” to boot. They all wanted to marry her, and she still thinks a lot about her appearance. She celebrates her 101st birthday during the production of this film which the well-travelled, Japanophile director and artist Edgar Honetschläger makes about her, himself and therefore their friendship. The 100 is erased, she starts again with the first candle.
It’s pure affirmation of life, carefully produced (from Pärt through Schubert to Morton Feldman), with comic passages (vitriolic harangues against the pope) and contemplative ones (for example reflecting about the new liberties of old age).
A few years after her death in 2009, the exceptional Austrian filmmaker, who was half her age and yet her soul mate and who has a fondness and talent for design and dosage, assembles the many small snapshots. In every second of this film, which was shot from the gut, as it were, you feel that both of them liked to live the moment rather than make a lot of words about “goals”. You don’t get this every day: dream cinema by and with extremely kind-hearted people to whom schmaltz is nevertheless an alien concept.

Barbara Wurm

One Day in Sarajevo

Documentary Film
Austria,
Bosnia-Herzegovina
2015
60 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Damir Ibrahimovic, Jasmila Zbanic
Jasmila Zbanić
Christine A. Maier
Isabel Meier
Igor Camo
On 28 June 1914, Gavrilo Princip shot the heir presumptive to the Austrian-Hungarian throne, Franz Ferdinand, in Sarajevo. A momentous assassination that is considered to have triggered the First World War.

Exactly 100 years later, Bosnian director Jasmila Žbanić, who has already tried to come to terms with history in her award winning feature films, visits the site of the historic event and asks people what they think of the assassin. Some see Princip as a national hero who fought for Bosnian freedom; others see him as a terrorist who destroyed the existing order. Žbanić mixes her own material with images the inhabitants and tourists recorded on their mobile devices, juxtaposing these contemporary images with excerpts from feature films about the assassination. The result is a multilayered view of the event and its consequences, not without some funny moments but primarily a reflection about what a nation deduces from its history. In Sarajevo, almost ahistorical moments of celebrations with marching children in uniform and machine guns are set against the critical voices of the counter-demonstrators who, in the spirit of the Occupy movement, are fighting against a new occupation of Bosnia: this time by capitalism.

Lina Dinkla
International Programme 2016
Paradies! Paradies! Kurdwin Ayub

Accompanying your Kurdish father on a family visit to Iraq: flat hunting and front line tourism outside the gates of ISIS. A young Viennese artist with a sense of tragicomedy explores cultural rifts.

Paradies! Paradies!

Documentary Film
Austria
2015
78 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Rudolf Takacs, Lixi Frank
Kurdwin Ayub
Kurdwin Ayub
Nooran Talebi
Rudolf Pototschnig
The plane that takes Kurdwin and her father Omar to their Kurdish relatives is almost empty. After all, who wants to fly to northern Iraq these days? Omar has built a successful medical practice in Vienna. Kurdwin grew up in Austria and views this visit “home” with a critical eye anyway. With her camera she tries to fathom why her father gets euphoric at the mere mention of the word Kurdistan and insists on buying a second home in a place that’s only a stone’s throw from ISIS territory. A de facto building boom has started despite all the conflicts. Omar, too, wants to invest in a utopian future, maybe driven by defiance of the Viennese revenue office, maybe by homesickness or a newly awakened patriotism. Contrary to all sense of reality he displays an unrelenting optimism in front of his daughter’s camera which, after some all too obvious failures in the real estate issue, he can still redirect to a tourist honour visit to the frontline.

Kurdwin Ayub pushes the boundaries of the home movie with an instinct for tragicomic situations, exploring the intercultural rift in her family from inside. She plays with predetermined role patterns before and behind the camera, provokes by acting the naive young girl while her father plays the Molieresque hero – all of which gives the film a performative as well as situative character.

Lars Meyer


Nominated for Young Eyes Film Award
International Programme 2015
Since the World Was World Günter Schwaiger

Slaughtering, ploughing, harvesting grapes and searching for illegal marihuana plants in the cornfield. Being a farmer in Castile: doggedly traditional in the crisis – a warm-hearted observation.

Since the World Was World

Documentary Film
Austria,
Spain
2015
103 minutes
subtitles: 
German

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Günter Schwaiger, Cristina G. Alía
Günter Schwaiger
Bence Boka, Los Linces
Günter Schwaiger
Günter Schwaiger, Martin Eller
Günter Schwaiger
Cristina García Alía
Gonzalo is a farmer of the old school who lives with his family in Castile. To be called an agronomist would probably be an insult to someone like him. His way of managing things is in many ways the opposite of the all-devouring economisation of all areas of life. But he only chose this existence as a resistance fighter half-freely – the other half was forced upon him. First of all by a tradition that’s effectively in his bones. Then by a deep rootedness in the soil that nourishes him. And finally by a sturdy philosophy that makes him say such simple and clear things like: “When everyone was throwing money out of the window and lighting fires with banknotes, our kind was considered outdated and backward. Now that most people have lost everything the others are no better off than us, and we are more or less the same.”

Empathetic “Schadenfreude” und a surrealist sense of humour are essential parts of Gonzalo’s rustic world. Günter Schwaiger’s affectionate long-term observation of this world could also be seen as cinematic medication to strengthen our immune system against the temptations of consumerism and agricultural capitalism – defences our mind urgently needs.

Ralph Eue