Film Archive

Absolute Beginners

Documentary Film
Belgium
2018
42 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Fabien Siouffi
Fabrizio Terranova
Lawrence Le Doux
Tristand Galand
Bruno Tracq
Fabrizio Terranova
Nicolas Lebecque
If you’re not affected you have probably never heard of Huntington’s disease. But the hereditary genetic defect changes absolutely everything: the ability to control one’s body, contact with one’s soul, moods and emotions, the level of available energy … and last but not least the relationships with loved ones. There is no cure to date, but a test to find out before the outbreak of the disease whether you carry this genetic mutation.

The six people who very emotionally and honestly talk about their lives here have all tested positive, though they are at different stages of the disease. For fear of social ostracism, some of them only speak anonymously in front of the camera. Not all of them are ready yet to “show face” and admit to having the disease, which to outsiders often looks like severe dementia or a mental handicap, although every one of the persons who offer insights here impressively disproves such popular misunderstandings. What emerges clearly is that, when faced with incurable disease, we are always also faced with the question of how we can integrate the risk of mortality into our concept of life. Upon closer examination, though, this philosophical problem concerns each of us. A cinematic carpe diem and an ode to life.

Luc-Carolin Ziemann

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

After the Silence

Documentary Film
Belgium
2018
23 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Véronique Duys (Médiadiffusion)
Sonam Larcin
Axel Meernout
Louis Rousseau
Sonam Larcin
Igor Van De Putte, Ferri Van Overstraeten
“Tell me your story” – a request that should please anyone. A difficult one, though, when it’s directed at a young man in a Brussels office who is looking for asylum and has never admitted his homosexuality to anyone in his entire life. But it may also be an opportunity. And a good premise for telling the story in front of a film camera. A film about a slow arrival, in warm tones and tender gestures.

Silvia Hallensleben

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Big Wolf & Little Wolf

Animated Film
Belgium,
France
2018
14 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Arnaud Demuynck
Rémi Durin
Alexandre Brouillard, Gaspard Vanardois, Collectif L’Âme Strong
Rémi Durin
Amélie Coquelet, Rémi Durin, Paul Jadoul, Pierre Mousquet, Célia Tisserant, Célia Tocco
Rémi Durin
Philippe Fontaine
The big wolf leads a contented life: He reads books under his tree, grumbles over bills and listens to music, quite undisturbed. Until one fine morning the little wolf turns up and moves in with him. The little wolf listens to his records, turns the newspaper into paper planes and, to top it all, snores. The big wolf doesn’t need this kind of companionship. Or does he?

Marie-Thérèse Antony

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Erpe-Mere

Documentary Film
Belgium
2019
21 minutes
subtitles: 
_without dialogue / subtitles
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Noemi Osselaer
Noemi Osselaer
Yale Song, Jérémie De Witte
Noemi Osselaer
Noemi Osselaer, Elias Grootaers
Noemi Osselaer
Noemi Osselaer
A film portrait of the Flemish village of Erpe-Mere which – starting from the visible world – takes us to other layers of perception. Where tractors roar and whining engines race over the motocross track by day, at night a different world comes alive. We are drawn into a universe that doesn’t follow the laws of logic but those of dreams. A Méliès-like joy of optical illusions is coupled with humorous editing.

Luc-Carolin Ziemann

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

I Feel Your Eyes

Documentary Film
Belgium
2019
25 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Grégoire Verbeke, Ruth Vandewalle
Grégoire Verbeke
Grégoire Verbeke
Grégoire Verbeke
Grégoire Verbeke
Mohab Ezz
A dusty plain, as smooth as a sheet of paper. A desert landscape that might as well be a moonscape, especially when a horse and rider dash along the horizon, almost weightless, so fast that suddenly even the camera, equally unimpressed by gravity, can’t follow. But this is just training; the big race is yet to come. The people around the horse are getting more nervous every day. The dark shining horse on the other hand stays cool.

Lukas Foerster

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Insectopedia

Documentary Film
Belgium,
France,
Portugal
2018
23 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Victor Candeias (DocNomads), Lucie Rego (Hutong Productions)
Antoine Fontaine
Erwan Evin
Antoine Fontaine
Antoine Fontaine
Antoine Fontaine
Arnout Colaert
Over 36 years, an unmarried surgeon filmed and dissected insects in his Brussels apartment. 600 reels of wonderful, obsessively precise recordings and increasingly confused commentary paint a strange psychological profile. During his research on Dr. Veroft, Antoine Fontaine comes across a species of man whose social behaviour is conspicuously focused on six-legged creatures and who share their habitat with audibly scurrying chitin carapaces and Darth Vader figurines.

André Eckardt

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Int. Anouchka – Night

Documentary Film
Belgium
2019
20 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Sébastien Andres
Louise Hansenne
Georges Vanev
Nil-Enzo Clémentin
Louise Hansenne, Eloïse Berteau
Gianluca Kegelaert
Anouchka is thirty and a scriptwriter. She earns her living in a bar. For this short film she wrote an autofictional scenario about her long-term alcohol addiction. The film title takes up the scene titles used in screenplays: “Interior. Anouchka – Night.” The setting: Anouchka reads her text in a nocturnal studio and discusses it with the director. Gradually, reading and speaking are beginning to mingle with her first-person narrative.

Annina Wettstein

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Little Man, Time and the Troubadour

Documentary Film
Belgium,
Netherlands
2019
104 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Jan van der Zanden, Ineke Kanters
Ineke Smits
Walter Hus
Piotr Rosolowski
Katarina Türler
Ineke Smits, Sipa Labakhua
Jeroen Stout
“We didn’t care about nationality,” says an elderly lady. She is showing the house where she lived with her children as a young woman to her friend and the camera crew. The school was right around the corner. Everyone lived harmoniously door to door here: Armenians, Georgians, Abkhazians, Mingrelians. Until the war came. Everyone who could afford it fled. To Russia, to Turkey, to Georgia. Abkhazia, which considers itself a state, lies in the south of the Caucasus and borders on the Black Sea. Under international law the country belongs to Georgia, but has the status of an autonomous region.

The Abkhazian artist Sipa Labakhua has returned home after many years and now tours the country with his autobiographical puppet show. He tells of his own experiences, his flight, his father’s dreams – and collects more stories on his journeys: of Georgian peasants, Orthodox priests, Abkhazian nationalists, Syrian refugees and Russian hippies. The result is the poetic image of a society that couldn’t be more diverse and that is asking itself an essential question that concerns us all: How do you define the national and cultural identity of a country? Sipa Labakhua has a very original answer: He sees himself as a troubadour, his art as his country and his talent as his home.

Julia Weigl

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

International Programme
Machini Frank Mukunday, Trésor Tshibangu Tshamala

This homage to the Congolese city of Lubumbashi unfurls to become a critical journey, revealing fatal correlations of the global economy. We in the North play a certain role, too.

Machini

Animated Film
Belgium,
DR Congo
2019
10 minutes
subtitles: 
English
German
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Rosa Spaliviero, Ellen Meiresonne
Frank Mukunday, Trésor Tshibangu Tshamala
Francesco Nchikala
Frank Mukunday, Trésor Tshibangu Tshamala
Caroline Nugues-Bourchat, Frank Mukunday
Frank Mukunday, Trésor Tshibangu Tshamala
Frank Mukunday, Trésor Tshibangu Tshamala
David Douglas Masamuna
Einst verzauberten afrikanische Klänge den Alltag am Flussufer. Die Hommage von Frank Mukunday und Trésor Tshibangu Tshamala an ihre Stadt Lubumbashi entfaltet sich zu einer kritischen Reise und offenbart die fatalen Zusammenhänge der Weltökonomie. Auch wir im Norden spielen eine gewisse Rolle, wie die Schlusspointe aufrüttelnd anprangert. Mit recycelten rostigen Materialien, Steinen und Kreide positioniert sich das kongeniale Duo und widersetzt sich dem „Schwarzmarkt der Geschichte“ inhaltlich wie formal.

Nadja Rademacher

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Late Harvest
Marona’s Fantastic Tale Anca Damian

Marona-Sara-Ana-the-Ninth is of noble descent, but not a princess. She was given her names by her master and mistress. The modern fairytale about a dog raises questions of identity.

Marona’s Fantastic Tale

Animated Film
Belgium,
France,
Romania
2019
92 minutes
subtitles: 
English
German
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Anca Damian
Anca Damian
Pablo Pico
Brecht Evens, Gina Thorstensen, Sarah Mazetti
Boubkar Benzabat
Dan Panaitescu, Chloé Roux, Hefang Wei, Mathieu Labaye, Claudia Ilea
Anghel Damian
Clément Badin
Marona-Sara-Ana-the-Ninth may be of noble descent from her father’s side, graceful and beautiful, but she is no princess. She braves many an adventure in her short life: She learns acrobatics and magic tricks, temporarily ends up on the streets and even becomes a saviour in need. She is a bitch. Her names were given to her by a number of masters and mistresses. Anca Damian tells a touching story with imagination and humour.

An original, surrealist and childlike aesthetics, the combination of different animation techniques, strong stylisation and the gay colour palette make the protagonists particularly expressive. The striking backgrounds resemble witty and artistic wimmelbook pictures. The unusual angles make us discover the urban hustle and bustle from many perspectives simultaneously – with all senses. At the heart of the film, a realistic and critical portrait of urban society emerges that does not shy away from questioning our relationship to animals and thus to our values. Joy and sadness, farewells and beginnings are mutually dependent – even death is sensitively addressed. Damian’s modern fairytale is about identity and belonging. Full of musical and visual poetry and philosophical esprit, it celebrates – equally simply and extravagantly – the complexity of existence and the simplicity of happiness.

Nadja Rademacher

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Matilda

Animated Film
Belgium,
France,
Spain
2018
7 minutes
subtitles: 
_without dialogue / subtitles
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Arnaud Demuynck
Irene Iborra Rizo, Eduard Puertas Anfruns
Karim Bagili
Anna Molins
Irene Iborra Rizo
Nuria Robles, Edu Puertas, Irene Iborra Rizo
Irene Iborra Rizo
Philippe Fontaine
At night, when little Matilda’s room gets dark, the great adventures begin: Who wants to sleep when there’s so much to discover by torch light in the room? In the play of light and shadow, she sees her toys from a very different angle. This puppet animation shows how Matilda overcomes her fear of the dark and gives free rein to her creativity.

Marie-Thérèse Antony

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

My Name Is Clitoris

Documentary Film
Belgium
2019
78 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Isabelle Truc
Daphné Leblond, Lisa Billuart-Monet
Thibaud Lalanne
Lisa Billuart-Monet
Lydie Whisshaupt-Claudel, Daphné Leblond
Daphné Leblond, Lisa Billuart-Monet
Daphné Leblond, Pierre Dozin
Twelve young women explore an unknown continent: their body. More precisely, those parts of their body that are often shamefacedly referred to as “private parts. The protagonists speak quite naturally about the journey into their own sexuality, their emotions and (unexpected) discoveries, but also about fears and the feeling of moving into uncertain territory without assistance. Even though (or precisely because) they were all “sexually educated” at school or in the family, they had to laboriously acquire elementary knowledge about their own body themselves. Even today, the amount of available information about female anatomy and pleasure is in complete disproportion to that about male sexuality. The ignorance about the form, location and actual function of the clitoris which gives the film its title is only the tip of the iceberg that’s slowly being melted here.

The calm, trusting conversations open up a space for questions and reflections that we encounter far too rarely in our daily life, because talking about sexuality touches on taboos or because media stereotypes reinforce distorted images and wrong ideas. “My Name Is Clitoris” speaks a different language: It’s about the desire for (not just) sexual equality and the freedom to discover and satisfy one’s own pleasure.

Luc-Carolin Ziemann

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Night Has Come

Documentary Film
Belgium
2019
56 minutes
subtitles: 
No
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Peter Krüger
Peter Van Goethem
Guy Van Nueten
Peter Van Goethem
Peter Van Goethem, Peter Verhelst
Frederik Van de Moortel, Guy De Bièvre, Aiko Devriendt
According to recent medical findings, viruses can also cause a weakening or even loss of memory. Such an epidemic is the speculative narrative foundation of this film. The suspicion is uttered by the sonorous voice of an old man, who wakes up after having lost his memory in an unspecified incident and goes on a mental journey into his childhood. But the perspective soon widens to include collective life and conspiracy theories directed against the government – even questions about the last things.

The images illustrating this narrative were made between 1927 and 1998 and are now restored digital copies in the holdings of the Royal Belgian Film Archive. They cover a spectrum from home movies on the beach to the central iconic events of Brussels history, for example the Nazi deportations or the big fire in the “À l’innovation” department store in 1967. But art films, science films and documents of industrial history are also interwoven – with film aesthetics so homogenised that they are, out of their original contexts, convincingly integrated into the suggestively proposed new narrative logic, while always referencing the past, too.

Silvia Hallensleben

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Our Lucky Hours

Documentary Film
Belgium,
France,
Switzerland
2019
77 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Alexandre Cornu
Martine Deyres
Olivier Brisson, Nicola Marinoni
Jean-Christophe Beauvallet, Dino Berguglia, Antoine-Marie Meert
Philippe Boucq, Catherine Catella, Martine Deyeres
Martine Deyeres, Anne Paschetta
Olivier Hespel, Marianne Roussy, Olivier Schwob
Between 1939 and 1945, 45,000 patients died in French mental institutions. There was only one place where the patients survived the euthanasia: the hospital in the remote village of Saint-Alban. In addition, the doctors, nursing staff and patients there worked with the residents of the village to hide a number of war refugees, resistance fighters and persecuted Jews and thus save them from certain death.

What made Saint-Alban so exceptional? During her research, director Martine Deyres found photos, home movies and sound recordings in the hospital archives. She uses this material to draw the portrait of an institution that was far ahead of its time. The patients were respected, integrated and individually supported. By working in the household or on the fields, they also contributed, especially during the war, to the fact that no one in Saint-Alban had to go hungry. There was a patient newspaper and various arts and crafts classes. Auguste Forestier’s wooden sculptures even became famous as “art brut”, when the painter Jean Dubuffet discovered the works of the Saint-Alban patient after the war. All this coalesces into a rousing plea for a respectful treatment of the mentally ill, which is more important than ever in an age of economic constrictions and strong normative tendencies.

Luc-Carolin Ziemann

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

International Programme
Our Territory Mathieu Volpe

A journey into the light of southern Italy. Migrants work for starvation wages while vacationers enjoy themselves on the beach next door. The hunger for leisure, for life, and the small-big world in between.

Our Territory

Documentary Film
Belgium
2019
21 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Serge Kestemont, Olivier Burlet, Mathieu Volpe
Mathieu Volpe
Vincent D’Hondt
Mathieu Volpe
Pauline Piris-Nury
Mathieu Volpe
Jean-Noël Boissé
In grainy images of the southern Italian landscape, the director’s childhood memories merge with the present. Today, the region is populated not only by vacation-hungry families, but also by migrants working under precarious conditions. A city within the city, only without street names. The black-and-white images are reminiscent of Joris Ivens and Walker Evans. They tell stories of a gruelling daily grind and tough hierarchies in Mafia-like structures, but also of solidarity and departures.

Luc-Carolin Ziemann

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Late Harvest
That Which Does Not Kill Alexe Poukine

An unagitated, performative stocktaking of the subject of rape. Alexe Poukine recovers the offence from the dark zone and lets victims and perpetrators speak.

That Which Does Not Kill

Documentary Film
Belgium,
France
2019
85 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Cyril Bibas (CVB), Cécile Lestrade, Elise Hug (Alter Ego)
Alexe Poukine
Elin Kirschfink
Agnès Bruckert
Ada Leiris
Bruno Schweisguth
Conchita Paz, Epona Guillaume, Aurore Fattier, Marijke Pinoy, Marie Préchac, Sophie Sénécaut, Anne Jacob, Tristan Lamour, Noémie Boes, Maxime Maes, Yves-Marina Gnahoua, Tiphaine Gentilleau, Séverine Degilhage, Laurence Rosier
It’s well-established that the majority of sexualised violence doesn’t take place in the public sphere but in the seemingly protected realm of family, partnership and friends. This is also true of a young woman who was raped by a good friend on a private date. Her report was the occasion and basis of this film which interprets it first performatively, then analytically by women and men playing various roles.

In addition to the act itself, it addresses its consequences and how to deal with feelings of guilt, shame, paralysis and repression – but soon the performers’ own experiences as victims of perpetrators, too. In its directness and detail, speaking out is sometimes agonising for all participants. But talking and listening are the only chance to get hold of the phantoms and demons of the past and thus heal the wounds. Alexe Poukine’s differentiated and multi-faceted approach to an issue usually discussed in sensationalist terms offers us, the audience, a chance to dispassionately re-adjust our perspective on the act of rape.

Silvia Hallensleben

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.