Film Archive

Next Masters Wettbewerb 2015
A Summer Love Jean-François Lesage

Glaring neon lights, pounding Techno rhythms, lying in the grass, talking and dancing … the midsummer night’s dream of a group of adolescents, a sensuous feast.

A Summer Love

Documentary Film
Canada
2015
63 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Jean-François Lesage
Jean-François Lesage
Gold Zebra
Jean-François Lesage, Marianne Ploska
Mathieu Bouchard-Malo, Ariane Pétel-Despots
Jean-François Lesage
Bruno Bélanger, Alexis Pilon-Gladu, Aude Renaud-Lorrain
Bright neon colours are reflected in the faces of young people in a nocturnal park. The rhythms of electronic music can be heard from a distance. In the darkness big trees can be discerned whose branches grow high into the sky and which stand there as if they were guarding the young people lying in the grass. After a while they dance... and talk... a lot. Sometimes you feel like you’re in one of those French black and white films from the 1960s where people also talk incessantly. French is also spoken in this work by the Canadian director Jean-François Lesage – the main subjects are nothingness, and love. We hear a young man’s poetic off screen comment: “Love exists anyway.” The digital generation obviously has a lot to think and talk about concerning relationships and romantic dramas. The neon lights show them the way through a nocturnal nature, into the uncertain future of adulthood. Watching this is a sensuous experience.

Zaza Rusadze

After the Storm

(none)
Canada
2015
480 minutes
subtitles: 
(none)

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Heather Grieve, Helios Design Labs
Dan Sundy
Dear future disaster survivor,

This is the story of how your city is completely devastated and your world perishes without you.

On 26 April, 2011, the city of Tuscaloosa, Alabama, was devastated by a tornado. The result: 4,700 homes damaged, 10,000 made homeless, thousands injured. This web documentary in letter form offers not only general information about natural disasters. Its simple images, delicately drawn charts and the director’s voice over also create a very personal and emotional access to the subject.
Extended Reality: DOK Neuland 2015
ARTE360 – Plattform für 360°/VR-Video Thomas Wallner

ARTE is currently working on new 360° and virtual reality projects in the fields of culture, documentary and fiction which can be experienced via the ARTE360 platform and through virtual reality glasses.

ARTE360 – Plattform für 360°/VR-Video

(none)
Canada,
France,
Germany
2015
480 minutes
subtitles: 
(none)

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Thomas Wallner, Irene Vandertop, DEEP Inc.
Thomas Wallner
Scott Hermann, Joshua Park, Franz Hildgen, James Acres
ARTE is currently working on new 360° and virtual reality projects in the fields of culture, documentary and fiction which can be experienced via the ARTE360 platform and through virtual reality glasses.

The exhibition offers visitors access to the first documentaries through virtual reality headsets and cardboard glasses.

Cure

Documentary Film
Canada,
Ethiopia,
Germany
2015
20 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Sarah Noa Bozenhardt
Sarah Noa Bozenhardt
Fasika Abebe, Aster Assefa
Bernarda Cornejo Pinto
Sarah Noa Bozenhardt
Sarah Noa Bozenhardt, Bernarda Cornejo Pinto
An extremely tender portrait of Aster, a blind young mother who lives with her little daughter in a shared home for single mothers in Ethiopia. Her low singing about love and little mice pervades the film like a seeing person’s dream. The little girl is still called Bethi, but Aster wants to change her name to Medanit: the Amharic word for cure. The child leads her from darkness to light. She is her mother’s eye.

Matthias Heeder
International Programme 2015
In Deep Waters Sarah Van Den Boom

The three protagonists of this film are united by something that they must still learn to understand: a loss that happened so early in their lives they don’t remember it but that affected their development nonetheless.

In Deep Waters

Animated Film
Canada,
France
2015
12 minutes
subtitles: 
No

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Richard Van Den Boom
Sarah Van Den Boom
Pierre Caillet
Sarah Van Den Boom
Sarah Van Den Boom, Annie Jean
Gilles Cuvelier, Gabriel Jacquel, Samuel Guénolé, Marine Blin, Marion Le Guillou, Denis Fleurion, Pierre Lesca (Studio Train-Train), Sarah Van Den Boom
Sarah Van Den Boom
Pierre Yves Drapeau, Lise Wedlock, Jean Paul Vialard
The three protagonists of this film are united by something that they must still learn to understand: a loss that happened so early in their lives they don’t remember it but that affected their development nonetheless. The film uses different aesthetics to depict these persons’ search for a lost part of themselves, the questions they ask themselves and others, and the longing that will always be part of them.

Annegret Richter
International Programme 2015
Quiet Zone Karl Lemieux, David Bryant

Electromagnetic fields are invisible. But “electrosensitive” people sense that we are surrounded by all kinds of radio waves.

2015

Quiet Zone

Animadoc
Canada
2015
14 minutes
subtitles: 
No

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Julie Roy
Karl Lemieux, David Bryant
David Bryant
Mathieu Laverdière, Karl Lemieux, David Bryant
Mathieu Bouchard-Malo
Karl Lemieux
Olivier Calvert, David Bryant
Electromagnetic fields are invisible. But “electrosensitive” people sense that we are surrounded by all kinds of radio waves. The images of the film, too, sense more than they show: lonely American landscapes, suburban homes, radio towers, and sometimes the narrator, a woman on the run from civilisation. “Quiet Zone” responds to the increasingly restless human communication by a disintegration of reality on the level of the film material itself.

Lars Meyer

Sonámbulo – The Sleepwalker

Animated Film
Canada
2015
5 minutes
subtitles: 
_without dialogue / subtitles

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Theodore Ushev, Galilé Marion-Gauvin, Dominique Noujeim
Theodore Ushev
Nikola Gruev, Kottarashky
Theodore Ushev
Theodore Ushev
Theodore Ushev
Olivier Calvert
A free interpretation of the poem “Romance Sonámbulo” by Federico García Lorca. The “gipsyness” of Kottarashky’s music and the hypnotic choreography add to the poetic layers of colour and form. Ushev’s personal aesthetics, reminiscent of Miró here, takes us on a surreal trip to the guts of early twentieth-century modern art in Spain and to some of Lorca’s basic symbolic elements: water, air, mirrors, moon, the colour black and the female.

Victor Orozco
Next Masters Wettbewerb 2015
The Amina Profile Sophie Deraspe

A Syrian blogger who becomes a media star during the revolution, a lesbian online relationship, a crime. An enigmatic puzzle revolving around Social Media, hype and hysteria.

The Amina Profile

Documentary Film
Canada
2015
75 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Isabelle Couture, Nathalie Cloutier
Sophie Deraspe
Sam Shalabi
Sophie Deraspe
Geoffrey Boulangé, Sophie Deraspe
Frédéric Cloutier

In old fairytales the children get lost in the forest, today people get lost in the depths of the Internet. A young woman, Sandra from Montreal, begins an online relationship with the Syrian blogger Amina. The digital flirt becomes a romance, erotic fantasies are inspired and exchanged. When the Syria insurgency breaks out in 2011, Sandra encourages Amina to report on her daily life. The international media lap it up in a knee-jerk reaction: “A Girl from Damascus” reporting from the chaos of the war, a tender female voice in the midst of ever more confusing frontlines, and “gay” to boot. Then Amina is kidnapped. What fits into the media’s preconceptions and leads to an international search operation becomes Sandra’s private mission – and obsession. But suddenly the trail goes cold … Canadian filmmaker Sophie Deraspe helps Sandra deconstruct the case which turns out to be a highly complicated mix of hype and hysteria. She confronts her material in a complex and fluid narrative that captures the superimpositions of reality and fiction, media reality and projection, desire and revolution, leading the audience into a labyrinth at whose exit an almost trivial but all too human insight is waiting for us. Cornelia Klauß