Film Archive

Countries (Film Archive)

1717 Kilometers of Summer 2009

Documentary Film
Bosnia-Herzegovina,
Croatia,
Serbia,
Slovenia,
Kosovo,
Montenegro
2010
27 minutes
subtitles: 
_without dialogue / subtitles
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Jurij Meden, KINO!
Jurij Meden
Vlado Škafar, Jurij Meden
Jurij Meden
Jurij Meden
A personal summer travelogue through non-personal memories, collective personal ideals, and personal collective collectives. An old, once-upon-a-time country, reborn and undone in the blink of an eye. A youthful, romantic drive through bleak squares, forgotten roads, and reconstructed dreams. A poem.
Kumjana Novakova

A Cat Is Always Female

Animated Film
Croatia
2019
16 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Igor Grubić
Martina Meštrović, Tanja Vujasinović
Alen Sinkauz, Nenad Sinkauz
Jasenko Rasol
Iva Kraljević
Martina Meštrović
Martina Meštrović, Tanja Vujasinović
Hrvoje Pelicarić
Marija Ujević Galetović is a woman full of contradictions. “A woman is essentially nature”, she says. But also that she doesn’t want to be judged by her sex. She was the only female professor of sculpture at the Zagreb Academy. A congenial short portrait by two young female filmmakers who, with self-reflexive wit and clever animations of the artist’s works, sketch connecting and dividing lines between the generations.

Silvia Hallensleben
Country Focus Croatia
A Two Way Mirror Katarina Zrinka Matijević

Impressive nature shots of the Lika region in the Croatian interior filmed over the four seasons form a contrast to the director’s off-screen autobiographical tale – four lost pregnancies, separation, and epilepsy.

A Two Way Mirror

Documentary Film
Croatia
2016
42 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Nenad Puhovski, Tamara Babun
Katarina Zrinka Matijević
Šumovi protiv valova
Vjeran Hrpka
Ana Štulina
Katarina Zrinka Matijević
Vesna Biljan Pušić, Ivan Zelić
Impressive nature shots of the Lika region in the Croatian interior filmed over the four seasons, some with a macro camera, form a contrast to the director’s off-screen autobiographical tale – four lost pregnancies, separation, and epilepsy. Poetic images of blades of grass and animals, water and tunnels, allegorise the mental struggle for survival and focus on beauty despite all painful experiences. The film, in which not only the director’s individual traumatic past but the collective history of the country are inscribed, functions as a meditative self-reflection of universal value.

Borjana Gaković

After Party

Documentary Film
Croatia
2018
22 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Marin Leo Janković, Laura Vuksan
Viktor Zahtila
Karla Jurić
Elena Radošević, Viktor Zahtila
Viktor Zahtila
A universal story of separation about two lovers who can’t live together. These arguments about concepts of life and love, hedonism and principles are cleverly staged and told in five chapters, with a full dose of eroticism, with obsessive jump cuts and beautifully photographed – complete with an excursion on the homophobia of Croatian everyday society.

Borjana Gaković

Airport

Animated Film
Croatia,
Switzerland
2017
10 minutes
subtitles: 
_without dialogue / subtitles
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Ruedi Schick, Ankica Jurić Tilić
Michaela Müller
Hrvoje Štefotić
Michaela Müller
Michaela Müller
Michaela Müller
Michaela Müller, Aleksandar Battista Ilić
Fa Ventilato
The letters on a departure board turn into grey figures with trolley suitcases hurrying through the high security airports of this world. A red wall abruptly puts an end to the journey of a restless man whose wide-spread arms melt like Icarus’s wings. Reality is punctured and the fatal contradictions of our globalised world are metaphorically exposed. Michaela Müller spent six years condensing her original sound sketch stills into a work of art.

Nadja Rademacher
Country Focus Ex-Yu
Autofocus Boris Poljak

Observing tourists from all over the world who come to his home on the Dalmatian coast, Poljak, known as a DOP in feature as well as documentary films, managed to produce an exciting study.

Autofocus

Documentary Film
Croatia
2013
28 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Damir Čučić, Milva Čučić, Milva film i video
Boris Poljak
Boris Poljak
Damir Čučić
Boris Poljak
Martin Semenčić
Observing tourists from all over the world who come to his home on the Dalmatian coast, Poljak, known as a DOP in feature as well as documentary films, managed to produce an exciting study: with a sharp eye he explores both quaint and serious variations of human behaviour.
Rada Šešić

Chris the Swiss

Documentary Film
Croatia,
Finland,
Germany,
Switzerland
2018
90 minutes
subtitles: 
English
German
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Samir (Dschoint Ventschr), Siniša Juričić (Nukleus Film), Heino Deckert (Ma.ja.de.), Iikka Vehkalahti (IV Films Ltd / p.s.72 productions)
Anja Kofmel
Marcel Vaid
Simon Guy Fässler
Stefan Kälin
Simon Eltz
Anja Kofmel
Daniel Hobi, Marco Teufen, Hrvoje Petek
Christian Würtenberg died in Croatia in 1992. Even though the young Swiss had come as a journalist, he was wearing the uniform of an international militia that fought on the Croatian side in the civil war. Why he took up arms has long remained a mystery. His cousin, the filmmaker Anja Kofmel, has confronted the question.

She interviews companions, complementing the documentary footage with dark, pared-down animated sequences which form the film’s narrative structure. Diving deeply into the political turmoil, the film portrays Chris’s path towards joining a group of nationalist mercenaries supported by Opus Dei. A politically explosive film even today, a visually impressive thriller that shows how quickly a person’s attitude can be devastated by war.

Luc-Carolin Ziemann


Nominated for the Goethe-Institut Documentary Film Prize and the MDR Film Prize; Swiss Film Award 2019: Best Documentary, Best Score, Best Editing

Days of Madness

Documentary Film
Croatia,
Slovenia
2018
74 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Oliver Sertić
Damian Nenadić
Miro Manojlović, Filip Sertić
Maja Šćukanec, Mladen Bađun, Damian Nenadić, Srđan Kovačević
Sandra Bastašić
Martin Semenčić
Kventiax, Seroquel, Rivotril, Prazine, Normabel … When Mladen and Maja, in a mix of detachment and anger, list the psychoactive substances that determine their lives and ruin their bodies with toxic side effects, it’s as if they were talking about terribly annoying family members. On top of their long medical history full of spells in hospitals there’s the fact that the real family members, whether long buried at the local cemetery or in the shape of parents scolding them from the next room, won’t surcease them either. In close cooperation with Mladen and Maja, who portray themselves in diary-like video recordings, Damian Nenadić shows two people who were left alone by society in their distress – or whose distress was caused by the latter in the first place. Maja’s borderline personality disorder was diagnosed as a consequence of her transgender identity. Mladen, who returned from the Yugoslavian war with depression, was first sent to a priest by his parents. “Days of Madness” depicts their gradual attempts to win back a little control of a life stolen by psychiatry, family and church. “Why is BPD a disorder and nationalism is not?”

Esther Buss


Nominated for the MDR Film Prize

Dum Spiro Spero

Documentary Film
Croatia
2016
50 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Nenad Puhovski
Pero Kvesić
Srđan Sacher
Pero Kvesić
Ana Šerić
Pero Kvesić
Danijel Pejić
Let’s not kid ourselves – dying is one of the more unpleasant things we have to cope with in life. Not to mention broken hazard lights, lampless light bulbs, fractious spouses, and a sister-in-law who can never find her mobile phone when she wants to leave the house (at last). Comfort comes in the form of a wonderful relationship with the mother-in-law that is based on mutual disregard, a well-run household in which books have taken over all the rooms, and an old dog with whom you’re competing about who will be the first to kick the bucket …

Dum spiro spero, to quote Cicero: while I breathe, I hope. But breathing can be a bit tricky when you have only twenty percent lung volume left, like Pero Kvesić. With a declining trend. The basic sound of this film (besides Kvesić’s Jew’s harp) is his wheezing as he moves through his shrinking universe, camera at the ready. Kvesić, who wrote countless novels, but also scripts for documentary and animation films, documents his decline with a sure sense of rhythm and detail. Without mawkishness, laconic and with the pitch-black, deadpan sense of humour with which people in the Balkans face death and other terrible diseases. It’s about dignity, self-determination and the next cigarette. Maybe breathing is overrated. And maybe we hope while we laugh?

Grit Lemke


Nominated for MDR Film Prize

Father

Animadoc
Bulgaria,
Croatia,
Germany
2012
16 minutes
subtitles: 
No
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Maria Stanisheva, Compote Collective
Ivan Bogdanov, Moritz Mayerhofer, Veljko Popović, Asparuh Petrov, Rositsa Raleva, Dmitry Yagodin
Petar Dundakov
Ivan Bogdanov
Vessela Dantcheva, Kristijan Dulic, Moritz Mayerhofer, Asparuh Petrov, Dmitry Yagodin
Ivan Bogdanov, Phil Mulloy
Emil Iliev
When did you last talk with your father? Will you ever ask him about those things that hurt you? In the film, an impossible dialogue is created between the one who left and the ones that were left behind.



Golden Dove in the International Competition Animated Film 2012

Gangster of Love

Documentary Film
Croatia
2013
80 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Vanja Jambrović
Nebojša Slijepčević
Augustin Kujundžić Ago
Nebojša Slijepčević
Nebojša Slijepčević, Iva Kraljević
Nebojša Slijepčević, Vanja Jambrović
Vladimir Božić, Milan Čekić
This charming, skillfully directed saga of an old fashioned provincial matchmaker has been tremendously successful in regional cinemas. All the more amazing knowing that even local feature films starring famous actors struggle to get audiences. Locally known as “Gangster”, Croat Nedjeljko Babić is the charismatic protagonist. He helps his countrymen find a partner. Sometimes even Germans and other foreign customers come to him for assistance. But the main character of the film is a Bulgarian single mother whose intensive search is an extremely hard nut to crack for the matchmaker. This funny yet serious, well balanced drama provides an inside look into the typical macho culture of a picturesque Balkan town.
Rada Šešić
Country Focus Croatia
Ghost in the Machine Leon Rizmaul

This experimental documentary which addresses the materiality and technicality of images, takes a look at media history, exploring what happens with narratives slumbering in (television) archives.

Ghost in the Machine

Documentary Film
Croatia
2018
27 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Sunčana Hrvatin Kunić
Leon Rizmaul
Marko Lucijan Hrašćanec
Ivan Brezovec
Hrvoje Mršić
Tajana Prpić
This experimental documentary which addresses the materiality and technicality of images and was produced by Croatian public television takes a look at media history, exploring what happens with narratives slumbering in (television) archives when the devices to play them no longer exist. With the participation of Irena Vrkljan, dffb graduate of the first hour, this poetic documentary reflects (television) life in a frequently repressed era – Yugoslavian real socialism. In a way that is now unusually affectionate for the Post-Yugoslav region.

Borjana Gaković

Here There

Animated Film
Croatia,
USA
2015
5 minutes
subtitles: 
_without dialogue / subtitles
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Vanja Andrijević
Alexander Stewart
Alexander Stewart
Alexander Stewart, Darko Masnec
Alexander Stewart
Alexander Stewart, Gideon Kiers
Day after day the sun shimmers over the harbour and the cafés – the eternal Croatian summer as a drawn diary. Dynamics are created by the repetitive use of original sounds and the increasing reduction of the animated drawings: sketches turn into graphical abstractions, objects into blotches of colour, free forms into geometrical ones. And a summer that is more than the sum of its parts slowly takes shape in the viewer’s head.

Nadja Rademacher

I Have Nothing Nice to Say to You

Documentary Film
Croatia
2006
30 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Nenad Puhovski
Goran Dević
Jure Černec
Vanja Siruček
Goran Dević
A war criminal, various accessories, known culprits, and yet: people stay silent or speak in ellipses. Memories and observations like searchlight cones break through the darkness surrounding the events.

Olaf Möller

Ich kann es mir sehr gut vorstellen

Animated Film
Austria,
Croatia
2003
4 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Daniel Šuljić
Daniel Šuljić
Daniel Šuljić
Daniel Šuljić
Daniel Šuljić
Daniel Šuljić
Daniel Šuljić
Daniel Šuljić
In a touching and simple coffee animation a father imagines the desperation he would feel at the loss of his daughter.

Franziska Bruckner
International Programme
IKEA for YU Marija Ratković Vidaković, Dinka Radonić

The identity history of Yugoslavia and ex-Yugoslavia is rife with conflicts and contradictions. Marija travels through this history by researching the inner workings of her own family.

IKEA for YU

Documentary Film
Croatia,
Sweden
2018
52 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Vera Robić Škarica, Marija Ratković Vidaković
Marija Ratković Vidaković, Dinka Radonić
Siniša Krneta
Dinka Radonić
Damir Čučić
Marija Ratković Vidaković, Dinka Radonić
Johan Bodin, Siniša Krneta
A family selfie in front of the “Three Fists”, a monument to the victims of the Second World War in Niš, the third largest city in Serbia today. Three concrete fists from the era of Titoism, are raised to the sky: the father’s fist, the mother’s, a child’s. Marija takes position, her mother and father next to her, her brother presses the button. This photo records nothing less than the whole identity history of Yugoslavia and Ex-Yugoslavia, rich in conflicts and contradictions – a history that still resonates and that Marija Ratković Vidaković, supported by her co-writer Dinka Radonić, investigates in this intimate family film.

Marked by parents and grandparents who have internalised the real-socialist ideas and values of the Tito era on the Balkan, the thirty three-year-old filmmaker must cope with a paradoxical inherited identity that has very little to do with her private world and life in Croatia. Marija knows that she doesn’t want to pass this heritage on to her son and she knows that in order to achieve this, it must wither in herself. Filmed over years, “IKEA for YU” is the testimony of a trip into her own family history, deep into its most intimate nooks and crannies where a long history full of twists and turns is deeply entrenched. And a trip far away from Croatia.

Lukas Stern


Nominated for the MDR Film Prize