Film Archive

International Programme 2014
Harvest Paul Lacoste

Every year, a colourful bunch of utterly diverse characters meet to pick grapes near Toulouse. An unusual look at a precarious job between poverty and self-determination.

Harvest

Documentary Film
France
2014
82 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Didier Creste
Paul Lacoste
Yvan Quehec
Anthony Brining
The scene: a small wine-growing region to the east of Toulouse. The time: mid-September. The cast: a company of about 15 women and men – “short service volunteers” for the few weeks of the wine harvest, armed with shears and buckets. The group has fanned out among the vines of a medium-sized grower in the Gaillac region. The statistics list them as harvest hands; the sociological term for them is “precariously employed”. The protagonists themselves, however, would qualify this imputation. Accepting it would mean handing over a big part of their pride. This attitude may be called unrealistic, but that’s precisely what director Paul Lacoste seems to be interested in: what people do and what they literally embody because of it rather than the opinions they express. The film still demonstrates almost casually how massively the insecurity of such an existence is inscribed into the protagonists’ behaviour. They all feel constrained by the unvoiced pressures of their situation. They may have more or less talent in suppressing such emotional and mental insights – but their objective effects can hardly be denied.

Ralph Eue



Healthy Workplaces Film Award 2014

Rules of the Game

Documentary Film
France
2014
106 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Muriel Meynard, Patrick Sobelman
Claudine Bories, Patrice Chagnard
Patrice Chagnard
Stéphanie Goldschmidt
Claudine Bories, Patrice Chagnard
Benjamin van de Vielle
There’s a rumour that the employment market is looking for bold individualists. Within limits, of course. The reality is: if it doesn’t fit, it’s made to fit – or rejected.
Lolita does not smile readily. Kevin doesn’t know how to sell himself. Hamid can’t abide bosses. They are twenty. They have no qualifications. They are looking for work and will be trained by a consulting agency over six months to learn the behaviour and forms of expression today’s employment market demands.
The consultants’ motives are more than honest: to enable young people to lead a decent life in the existing system. The kids see a new and strange world open up before their eyes. Both sides practice the best intentions, but now and then there are still glitches and sometimes there’s even the risk of a crash.
We’ve seen films about the admission process of acting schools (“Addicted to Acting”, et al.). But such situations, though exciting, are child’s play compared to the roles Lolita, Kevin and Hamid must learn to play if they want a part in the performance that is called “living (and surviving) in capitalism today”.

Ralph Eue



Golden Dove in the International Competition Documentary Film 2014