Film Archive

Down the Deep, Dark Web

Documentary Film
France,
Israel
2016
56 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Duki Dror, Alexandre Brachet, Liat Kamay-Eshed, Margaux Missika
Tzachi Schiff, Duki Dror
Frank Ilfman
Philippe Bellaiche, Gleb Volkov
Dror Yaakobovich
Yuval Orr
Ronen Nagel
Under the surface of Google Land where life is so comfortable there is a world known as the Deep or Dark Net. A virtual data space whose content will not be found by conventional search engines and that remains closed to ordinary users – unless they install dedicated software. Governments, banks or corporations use the Deep Net, as well as all those who wish to keep their online activities hidden. In Google Land we leave traces, in the Deep Net special encryption technology allows us to remain anonymous. Duki Dror’s and Tzachi Schiff’s comprehensive film about the Internet, privacy, surveillance and the vision of a completely new economic structure opens with its worst variation: as a market platform for drugs, child pornography and arms. Is this the reason why governments are fighting the Net? On the other hand it’s the only digital space that offers protection to critical journalists, opposition members in dictatorships or whistleblowers.

The film works its detailed and knowledgeable way through the current developments of our digital world without passing judgement. What’s at stake is individual freedom. The sceptical summary: people want just enough freedom to feel good. Google Land. Who cares if we expose ourselves to constant surveillance that way?

Matthias Heeder
International Programme 2016
How’s Your Prostate? Jeanne Paturle, Cécile Rousset

The title puts it bluntly. Two young women talk about a serious subject with some humour, both perfectly balanced between wit and sensitivity, illustrated in a reduced, associative style of drawing.

How’s Your Prostate?

Animated Film
France
2015
4 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Luc Camilli
Jeanne Paturle, Cécile Rousset
Thomas Dappelo
Jeanne Paturle, Cécile Rousset
Mélanie Braux
Jeanne Paturle, Cécile Rousset
Jeanne Paturle, Cécile Rousset, Cécile Mille
Manuel Vidal
The title puts it bluntly. Two young women talk about a serious subject with some humour, both perfectly balanced between wit and sensitivity, illustrated in a reduced, associative style of drawing. A prostate operation furnishes the occasion for a surprisingly relaxed conversation between father and daughter and a cautious approach to the fundamental issue of “erectile function”. And then there are one’s own confusing erotic dreams.

André Eckardt


Nominated for mephisto 97.6 Audience Award
International Programme 2016
Lead in the Head Aurore Peuffier

A shot that hits the mark. Right into the head of the wolf that ends up as a trophy bearing a red mark on the village square. And is expected to perish there, but then leaps up unexpectedly and flees.

Lead in the Head

Animated Film
France
2016
7 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Olivier Chantriaux
Aurore Peuffier
Aurore Peuffier
Aurore Peuffier
Aurore Peuffier
Agathe Courtin
A shot that hits the mark. Right into the head of the wolf that ends up as a trophy bearing a red mark on the village square. And is expected to perish there, but then leaps up unexpectedly and flees. The blue hours of the night bring little redemption, but morning will bring a voice that over and beyond death will testify to the mortality of the wolf, tangibly and figuratively. Painted in expressive lines, in natural colours, blue like the hope for a new existence, and finally blazing like death.

Nadja Rademacher


Nominated for mephisto 97.6 Audience Award
International Programme 2016
Oleg’s Choice Elena Volochine, James Keogh

A young Russian at the frontline in the eastern Ukrainian Donbass region. Patriotism, heroic pathos and a battle that will change everything. A rare interior view of a war.

Oleg’s Choice

Documentary Film
France
2016
75 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Valérie Montmartin
Elena Volochine, James Keogh
Elena Volochine, James Keogh
Elena Volochine, Tania Goldenberg
Elena Volochine, James Keogh
He had originally planned to stay only for three days, more of a short break. But now Oleg, a Russian from West Siberia, has been here for a year and is the commander of a battalion of volunteers whom no one called, no one seems to control and who serve in no official army. They didn’t come for money but out of patriotism, for Russia, which must be defended in the Ukrainian Donbass. Journalist Elena Volochine and photo reporter James Keogh want to know why they risk their lives there, far away from home.

They are interested in what Oleg thinks, regardless of propaganda and the quick looks taken by Western media – without fraternising with him. They take down the vocabulary that feeds his self-empowerment as the saviour of the Russian cause. “Someone has to do it”, or “We just want to help” are the catchphrases, accompanied by a soundtrack of cloying patriotic pop songs that draw on the former heroic pathos of the Red Army. Even if combat operations are left out of the film, respect is due to the filmmakers for the persistence with which they stay close to Oleg to comprehend how he reflects his experience. The film revolves around an operation commanded by him which will change everything. Once you’re infected with war you don’t get rid of the virus so easily.

Cornelia Klauß
International Programme 2016
The Graduation Claire Simon

Entrance exams for the legendary Paris film school La Fémis: hundreds of young film lovers on the threshold of Olympus which few of them will cross. A rare and fascinating look behind the scenes.

The Graduation

Documentary Film
France
2016
120 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Arnaud Dommerc (Andolfi)
Claire Simon
Claire Simon
Luc Forveille
Claire Simon
Olivier Hespel
If you ask young people what they want to be you often hear: something in the media. It’s no different in France, though they love and revere film as an art form here more than in other countries. If you want to climb Mount Olympus and be accepted by the most famous of all film schools, La Fémis, you must join a long queue of competitors. Alain Resnais and Claire Denis started out here, Johan van der Keuken and Rithy Panh.

Claire Simon documents this process of selection among hundreds of applicants very matter-of-factly. Her goal is not to distinguish individual applicants with their expectations and disappointments but to show the institution’s efforts to play fair. The guiding principle is: everyone is equal, only the best make it. It’s up to us to apply this standard, especially in those situations when the exhausted committee tries to understand, comprehend, unscramble the young people – without discouraging them completely. Another board consists of cinema operators, directors and film critics, who are part of the process because of their practical experience. A charming idea and worth imitating. The case of Rainer Werner Fassbinder could offer some comfort: he was not accepted by the Berlin dffb film school at the time.

Cornelia Klauß


Nominated for Healthy Workplaces Film Award
International Programme 2016
We’ll Be Alright Alexander Kuznetsov

Two young women who grew up in a home, were declared mentally handicapped and placed under disability, and their brave struggle with the Russian state for the right to lead their own lives. Kafkaesque.

We’ll Be Alright

Documentary Film
France
2016
81 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Rebecca Houzel
Alexander Kuznetsov
Alexander Kuznetsov
Alexander Abaturov
Alexander Abaturov
Yulia and Katia are „unwanted children” in more than one respect. Cast out by their families, placed in orphanages by the state and finally committed to a “Psychoneurological Institute” in Eastern Siberia, they – like many others – were robbed of their most elementary rights. Even though they are young women now, the bleak outlook for the rest of their lives is still the Institute. But they dream of freedom, of a self-determined life. And they are ready to fight for it. Two attempts to be finally declared legally mature take them on the stony path through Russian bureaucracy where they face with courage and angelic patience aloof judges – characters that might have sprung from a novel by Kafka – and psychological assessments never explained to them, even when requested.

With a keen sense of essentials and telling gestures the film follows them through the various levels of the judiciary system and portrays them in their familiar environment which has, despite their longing and the appalling injustice, come to replace normality for them. Both of them, angry Katia and resigned Yulia, are something like the gentle stars of the Institute. The film does leave the viewer quite ambivalent about how, considering their biographies, they can make it in the cold freedom outside. Hope is a gamble.

Lars Meyer
International Programme 2016
Wind in Your Shoulders Anne-Sophie Raimond

In Chinese medicine weather phenomena are used to describe physical conditions. In a witty and graphically impressive mix Anne-Sophie Raimond illustrates the underlying philosophy.

Wind in Your Shoulders

Animated Film
France
2015
3 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

La Poudrière
Anne-Sophie Raimond
Benoît Razy
Myriam Copier, Mélanie Braux
Hugo Frassetto, Eloïc Gimenez
Pierre Sauze
In Chinese medicine weather phenomena are used to describe physical conditions. In a witty and graphically impressive mix Anne-Sophie Raimond illustrates the underlying philosophy. Her diagnosis of the ecosystem of the human body takes little more than three minutes: a fast-paced animated collage of historical medical atlases, mandalas made of fingerprints and haunting drawings. And now please stick out your tongue!

André Eckardt


Nominated for mephisto 97.6 Audience Award
International Programme 2016
Working Life Martin Rit, Mariette Désert

At a prevocational school 14-year-olds are to be qualified to find a place in the working world of skilled crafts and trades. Making something with one’s own hands and being proud of it? Difficult …

Working Life

Documentary Film
France
2016
59 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Justin Taurand
Martin Rit, Mariette Désert
Martin Rit
Martin Rit, Mariette Désert, Raphaëlle Martin Holger
Mariette Désert
Fighter pilot, farmer, “circus” or “don’t know” is what the boys say when asked what they want to be. They are 14 and have already blown one chance: that of having a career. Having missed out on a higher educational qualification, they attend a prevocational education programme where various internships are supposed to give them some kind of access to the working world. Mariette Désert and Martin Rit follow a class on this path for a year, uncovering a deplorable social development: the students work in classic trades with more or less (dis)interest – baker, mechanic, bricklayer, carpenter. Once these trades were practised with pride, looked back on a long tradition and formed the backbone of society. No idea could be further from the boys’ minds, and teachers and masters are desperately trying to teach them what it means to create something with their own hands. Why it is different from mass production and what it means to be needed by society.

The directors concentrate on Steve, a quiet boy who at first only searches for buried treasures with a metal detector, and who goes through a slow learning process which ends with a glimmer of hope. At the same time one understands the boys’ horror when they realise that the monotonous routine of getting up early, working and getting home late will continue for a long time. It’s called a working life.

Grit Lemke


Nominated for Healthy Workplaces Film Award, Young Eyes Film Award