Film Archive

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German Competition 2014
Himmelverbot Andrei Schwartz

Hrib, who protested his innocence for more than 20 years, is released from a prison near Bucharest. A painful rehabilitation and growing doubts: Is it all a lie?

Himmelverbot

Documentary Film
Germany
2014
86 minutes
subtitles: 
German

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Gerd Haag
Andrei Schwartz
Bernd Meiners, Susanne Schüle, Andrei Schwartz
Heidrun Schweitzer
Andrei Schwartz
Marin Cazacu, Dinu Constantin, Severin Renke
Romanian-born director Andrei Schwartz met Gavril Hrib, who had been sentenced to life for murdering a public prosecutor, in 2002, when he was shooting his film “Jailbirds” at the high security prison of Rahova near Bucharest. After more than 20 years Hrib is finally released on probation, into a country he knows only from the Ceauşescu era. Romania, now a part of the European Union, has changed, including a new jurisdiction that allows early releases. Hrib, a lanky guy with a kippah under his baseball cap, knows how to win hearts with his sly wit and gawky helplessness. He worked hard to earn respect inside; outside he comes up against nothing but rejection and closed doors. Andrei Schwartz traces this painful attempt at rehabilitation over several years. What becomes manifest is that neither society nor Gavril Hrib are ready and that everything ultimately leads back to the starting point: the actual crime.
Cornelia Klauß
International Programme 2014
Jedes Bild ist ein leeres Bild Christoph Faulhaber

The artist’s alter ego, his video game avatar, explores public space. Virtual reality, surveillance, video clip, document, fiction, and a wild ride.

Jedes Bild ist ein leeres Bild

Documentary Film
Germany
2014
70 minutes
subtitles: 
No

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Protostyle Pictures
Christoph Faulhaber
Pawel Wieleba, Otto Bode, John Francis, The Superpowers, The Embassadors, Harmony Hopper, Oliver Samlaus, Skuzzle Buzz, Giacomo Puccini, Christoph Faulhaber, Frank Müller et al.
Lukasz Chrobok, Christoph Faulhaber, Daniel Matzke, Jayson Haedrich, Gregor Gärtner, Jens Apitz
Maren Großmann, Anna Werner, Wolfgang Lehmann, Ramon Urselmann, Jonathan Miske
Thorsten Ernst, Christoph Faulhaber
Pawel Wieleba, Modo Bierkamp
There is the idea that public space is an actuality without prerequisites, which has evolved around us without alternative. For quite a while now, Christoph Faulhaber has countered such ideas with apparently naive questions. He simply re-dedicates intimidations and prohibitions and uses them as material for his equally subversive and meaningful statements.
Faulhaber has clear ideas of what the “venue” of art should be. His performances neither take shape in a safe studio nor are they presented exclusively behind the well cleaned windows of galleries. He prefers to stage his experiments against the order of the ruling systems right in the midst of society. After he was prohibited from taking photos of a US embassy, for example, he simply turned the tables and guarded the embassy so it wouldn’t be photographed by the public. This action in turn was documented on photographs that he then exhibited at documenta 12 – without an official invitation, of course –, which was promptly terminated. When he tried to enter the US as a German scholarship holder with a legal visa later, he was interrogated and urged to leave the country.
What this film teaches us in the most inspiring manner: the negotiation of power and the part images play in this process.
Ralph Eue
German Competition 2014
Striche ziehen. Gerd Kroske

Punk in Weimar, two brothers and a betrayal, prison, departure and action art at the Berlin wall. GDR archaeology bursting with cheerful, noisy anarchy and lines that extend to the present day.

Striche ziehen.

Documentary Film
Germany
2014
96 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Gerd Kroske
Gerd Kroske
Klaus Janek, Die Madmans, KG Rest
Anne Misselwitz
Karin Gerda Schöning
Gerd Kroske
Mark Meusinger, Sylvia Grabe, Helge Haack
“The White Stripe” was the name of an art project in which five GDR citizens from the Weimar punk and underground scene who had left the GDR in 1986 wanted to paint a line around the Western side of the Berlin wall. On the second day, GDR border guards ambushed them and one of the friends ended up in Bautzen prison. Only after years in the West did they find out that in the GDR one of them had reported their activities – and about his brother.
Gerd Kroske plumbs the depths of betrayal, suppression and forgiveness in interviews with the protagonists, including a brash (and not unsympathetic) border guard, supported by a wealth of archive material with the scratchy, anarchic charm of Super 8 and ORWO. He insists without discrediting. The deeper he delves into the past, the more it recedes in favour of the question how both sides continued to live with the betrayal. The topicality of this story emerges in the great final showdown between the brothers as well as in the recurring images of the wall between Israel and Palestine. It’s not that easy to paint lines even today. Especially if it’s the line you want to draw under something.
Grit Lemke