Film Archive

Hadarim

Animadoc
Israel
2016
5 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Shlomi Yosef
Shlomi Yosef
Shlomi Yosef, Yannay Matarasso
Barred windows, frog’s eye perspectives, wires. The shrill sound of metal on a blackboard. Dada bodies looking like prostheses teach and learn about the past. Thoughts wander. A grotesque about a seven-year-old boy’s school life in Israel.

Esther Buss


Nominated for Young Eyes Film Award

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

German Competition
Muhi – Generally Temporary Rina Castelnuovo-Hollander, Tamir Elterman

A Palestinian boy who masters his difficult path between the political frontlines with an infectious laugh. A great, heartbreaking and encouraging film.

Muhi – Generally Temporary

Documentary Film
Germany,
Israel
2017
86 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Hilla Medaila (Medalia Productions), Jürgen Kleinig (Neue Celluliod Fabrik)
Rina Castelnuovo-Hollander, Tamir Elterman
Ran Bagno
Avner Shahaf, Oded Kirma, Rina Castelnuovo-Hollander, Tamir Elterman
Joëlle Alexis
Ronen Geva, Maximilian Bloching
Six-year-old Muhi has an infectious laugh and loves to imitate his grandfather, Abu Naim. The boy, who was born the son of a Hamas activist in Gaza, has spent his whole life in an Israeli hospital. He has a rare autoimmune disease. When he was two his hands and feet had to be amputated. In Gaza he would be condemned to die, because healthcare is in a desolate state there. On the other side of the border he can get treatment, but the price is high.

Muhi leads a paradoxical life. The only person allowed to accompany him to Israel was his grandfather. This hospital has been their “home” for six years now, far from their family. Muhi hardly knows his parents and siblings. His father condemns the state that keeps his son alive and wants the boy back in Gaza – whatever the cost. Though Muhi’s sphere of action is doubly limited, he has settled into his life and his optimism and courage make its obstructions seem absurd. And yet the irresolvability of his personal tragedy shines through the surface of every scene in this sensitive film. The end leaves us wondering how this unusual child will be able to continue to go his own way in the future.

Luc-Carolin Ziemann



Golden Dove German Competition;
Nominated for ver.di Prize for Solidarity, Humanity and Fairness, Goethe-Institut Documentary Film Prize, DEFA Sponsoring Prize

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

The World Is Mine

Documentary Film
Israel
2017
68 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Ann Oren, Motomi Haruyama, Dafne Narvaez Berlfein
Ann Oren
Manuela Schininá
Hiroki Iwai
Isabell Spengler
Vraja Parra
Ann Oren
Manuela Schininá
Hatsune Miku is a musical phenomenon that inspires the masses. Her lyrics hit the fans right in the heart, her style inspires the multitudes and her merchandising is out of this world. What makes her so special? She’s not a human being but a synthesizer software incorporated in an animated character whose music is always fan art. M, the protagonist of this film and a cosplayer incorporating Hatsune Miku, delves into a fairytale world – and fairytales, they say here, “are full of fraud”. M meets sworn members of the Miku cult, encounters a generous helping of Japanese popular culture, and herself.

Kim Busch

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Wall

Documentary Film
Israel
2017
64 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Michal Weits, Moran Ifergan
Moran Ifergan
Moran Ifergan
Moran Ifergan
Shahaf Wagshall
“I know how lonely Jerusalem can be. And with all your depressing beliefs about how hard life is and how all men cheat. It doesn’t have to be that way, Mori. Come to Tel Aviv, you can see the sun and make your films here.” Moran Ifergan’s mailbox is full. Relatives and friends worry about her. Her marriage has failed and faith didn’t work out either. But she doesn’t want to go to Tel Aviv, she wants to stay in Jerusalem, where she films the Western Wall and all those who approach it: men on one side, women on the other.

Moran Ifergan takes her camera close to the wall, shows its cracks stuffed with prayer notes. Mountains of scribbled-on paper that must be removed with sticks later. How do the contents differ on the two sides that are themselves separated by a kind of wall? And what is that wall between Ifergan and her mother, who considers her daughter’s lifestyle an imposition? This film is a personal testimony communicated through recorded phone calls as well as the very intimate look of its maker. A film full of solidarity and curiosity, but also defiance.

Carolin Weidner

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.