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#uploading_holocaust Sagi Bornstein, Udi Nir

Young Israelis performing a rite of initiation, the “Journey to Poland”: seven days, three mass graves, four concentration camps, and cameras running all the time. An exercise in identity made up of YouTube videos – horror 2.0.

#uploading_holocaust

Documentary Film
Austria,
Germany,
Israel
2016
75 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Gebrüder Beetz Filmproduktion, udiVsagi production
Sagi Bornstein, Udi Nir
Uri Agnon
Sagi Bornstein, Gal Goffer
Aviv Aldema
It’s like an initiation ritual. Every year 25,000 Israeli pupils and students go on a trip to Poland, visiting four concentration camps, three mass graves and two ghettos in seven days. It’s a journey to the dead, their roots, and themselves: as Jews and citizens of Israel. They document everything on their smartphones: hotel rooms, barracks, shooting ranges, themselves, their friends. The material shared on YouTube is the basis of this film – and it’s revealing. The two Israeli directors Sagi Bornstein and Udi Nir set contemporary recordings against videotapes from the 1980s. How will the memory change when there are no more contemporary witnesses? What can the crumbling sites still reveal? When will the rituals become hollow?

The Holocaust is the narrative of Israel, the constituent element of the state, even more than Zionism. That’s what the young people are taught to believe. The concept is historical imagination and immersion. They are supposed to feel the squeeze of the cattle wagons, the hardness of the narrow pallets and the oppression of the gas chambers. Horror 2.0. The video material also shows, however, how much smarter the young people are. There are no stupid questions, documentary filmmaker Marcel Ophüls once said, only stupid answers.

Cornelia Klauß


Nominated for Young Eyes Film Award

Wall

Documentary Film
Israel
2017
64 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Michal Weits, Moran Ifergan
Moran Ifergan
Moran Ifergan
Moran Ifergan
Shahaf Wagshall
“I know how lonely Jerusalem can be. And with all your depressing beliefs about how hard life is and how all men cheat. It doesn’t have to be that way, Mori. Come to Tel Aviv, you can see the sun and make your films here.” Moran Ifergan’s mailbox is full. Relatives and friends worry about her. Her marriage has failed and faith didn’t work out either. But she doesn’t want to go to Tel Aviv, she wants to stay in Jerusalem, where she films the Western Wall and all those who approach it: men on one side, women on the other.

Moran Ifergan takes her camera close to the wall, shows its cracks stuffed with prayer notes. Mountains of scribbled-on paper that must be removed with sticks later. How do the contents differ on the two sides that are themselves separated by a kind of wall? And what is that wall between Ifergan and her mother, who considers her daughter’s lifestyle an imposition? This film is a personal testimony communicated through recorded phone calls as well as the very intimate look of its maker. A film full of solidarity and curiosity, but also defiance.

Carolin Weidner