Film Archive

Craboom

Animated Film
Italy
2012
12 minutes
subtitles: 
No

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Francesco Arcuri
Francesco Arcuri
Francesco Arcuri
Francesco Arcuri
Francesco Arcuri
Francesco Arcuri
Francesco Arcuri
Francesco Arcuri
Craboom is the onomatopoeic sound of a strong explosion. An animatio where daily life elements turn into imagery symbols. In a paper world populated by two-dimensional characters, the interference of a disruptive vision breaks the “inexorable running” of a clock, blasting the harmony of a normal family life into small lonelinesses.

Das Venedig Prinzip

Documentary Film
Germany,
Italy,
Austria
2012
80 minutes
subtitles: 
German

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Thomas Tielsch, Filmtank GmbH
Andreas Pichler
Jan Tilman Schade
Attila Boa
Florian Miosge
Andreas Pichler, Thomas Tielsch
Stefano Bernardi
It’s hard to find a more popular city than Venice. But what is a dream for many people has become a nightmare for the residents. This film shows cruise ships and coaches spilling their loads of tourists at the banks of the old town, from which they flood squares, bridges and alleys. The tourists may bring money – especially for the big corporations -, but they are also the curse of this city.
This film follows a few residents, perhaps the last of their kind, through their Venice. They show an infrastructure on the verge of collapse. Food stores are rare; schools and post offices have closed, replaced by ever more hotels and piers for huge cruise ships. “What can you do?” a Venetian woman asks resignedly. “Sell glassware and souvenirs?” She too rents out her house to pay for its refurbishment. Another born Venetian is forced to move to the mainland because he can’t afford the rent. Only foreigners and rich Italians can pay the expensive prices per square meter, an embittered real estate agent concludes. Only 60000 residents still live in the historic city centre today. The same number of people visit the city every day. Venice is degenerating into an open air museum. The film takes a sobering look behind the picture postcard idylls of Doge’s Palace, Rialto Bridge and the pigeons of St. Mark’s Square.

– Antje Stamer

Frosted Chocolate Mouse

Animated Film
Italy
2011
3 minutes
subtitles: 
_without dialogue / subtitles

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Donato Sansone, Milkyeyes
Donato Sansone
Enrico Ascoli
Donato Sansone
Donato Sansone
Donato Sansone
Donato Sansone
Enrico Ascoli
Not only the worldnever stops but also the stream of consciousness. A dreamlike and surreal vision in which the same elements swirl around, running after themselves in an infinite sequence.
International Programme 2012
Isqat al Nizam - At The Regime Border Antonio Martino

An expedition to the Syrian border, encounters with refugees, deserted soldiers, Internet activists. Blood, beatings, torture, executions. A harrowing border experience.

Isqat al Nizam - At The Regime Border

Documentary Film
Italy
2012
78 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Roberto Ruini, Pulsemedia
Antonio Martino
Mario Romanazzi, Valerio Pellegri, Vincenzo Scorza
Antonio Martino
Giuseppe Trepiccione, Simone Incerti Zambelli
Giordano Raggi
Diego Schiavo
This powerful film about the Syrian revolution features a variety of borderline experiences. For example the exiled journalist who is collecting material for an oppositional television network at the Turkish-Syrian border. He meets compatriots from all population groups – deserted soldiers, Internet fighters, refugees. The camera in these live sound passages is almost frozen, the shadows on the faces sharply delineated: stories of the beginning of the revolution, of dead friends and siblings. Then there are the disturbing YouTube films produced by the hundreds every day – a system running amuck. Soldiers in heavy boots jumping on the heads of tied-up protesters. Soldiers shooting a prisoner. Soldiers taking whole cities hostage. Orders to snipers: shoot everyone filming with a mobile phone! A young man who a moment ago was recording is bleeding to death on the backseat of a taxi. His brother continues. Upload to the Web. It’s mind-boggling when the agents of the system film each other at work. On camera torture. Executions. And beatings, beatings, beatings. There are no more restraints here. Finally the panic in a young girl’s voice as she watches soldiers storming her parents’ house. And we, who are watching all this? We allow the statesmen and special envoys and commissioners to play their game of oil, military bases and geopolitics. We have become so tired of all the images flooding us, and so weak. Still – there is no alternative to publishing this horror. The revolt is circling on the web. The fever is rising.
– Matthias Heeder

White Men

Documentary Film
Italy
2011
65 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Enrico Giovannone, Babydocfilm
Alessandro Baltera, Matteo Tortone
Rodolfo Mongitore
Matteo Tortone
Alessandro Baltera, Enrico Giovannone
Alessandro Baltera, Matteo Tortone
Nicolò Angelino
The white citizens of Tanzania are the rich settlers. The “white men”, the albinos, however, the white ones among the black ones, are considered underprivileged and leprous. And not only that: especially in the region around Lake Victoria superstition has it that anyone who owns a part of their body will suddenly become rich. So they live like fair game, constantly in danger of being attacked, mutilated or hacked to pieces. The film manages to make this permanent feeling of exposure palpable by following the protagonists on long walks through streets lined with shabby cabins. What is garbage here, what is furniture? They seem defenceless, forced to run this gauntlet every day while people are calling from all sides: Hey, white man. The two Italian directors Baltera and Tortone portray four of them, show how they organise their survival, how they fight back. The rapper Dixon, for example, takes the offensive: as Mr. White he angrily cries out his lyrics at the local Kiss Club. Or Alfred Kapole, president of the local Albino Center, who collects all the horrible news from the region, usually unable to help. The idea of shooting the film in black and white is almost mandatory as a format if you want to take the albinos’ perspective. Those who are different face difficulties all across the globe, but here, where the perpetrators have practically nothing to fear, the albinos live in dread.
– Cornelia Klauß