Film Archive

Deployments

Documentary Film
Netherlands
2018
16 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Tim Rutten
Stéphanie Lagarde
Stéphanie Lagarde, Francesco Cimino
Stéphanie Lagarde, Graham Kelly
Stéphanie Lagarde
VSTEP
Stéphanie Lagarde
Francesco Cimino, Jérémie Bernard
We see picture puzzles of state control, showing simulation software for large-scale police operations and fighter pilots’ finger exercises, the movement profile of a mass protest and the ornaments made by a flying squadron. Code words drop into the frame from offscreen: orders and instructions with a poetic rhythm. The practices and media of control – what are they based on? They follow algorithms and purposes, but are also beautifully designed and musical.

Lukas Stern

Get Real!

Animated Film
Netherlands
2010
12 minutes
subtitles: 
_without dialogue / subtitles

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Willem Thijssen
Evert de Beijer
Edwin van der Schrier
Evert de Beijer
Evert de Beijer
Evert de Beijer
Addicted to gambling. A permanently tired school kid in real life, the muscled bodyguard of a sexy pop star in virtual space. “Get Real!” is an intense, pumping, aesthetically astounding depiction of reality shifts, leaden fatigue and social isolation. Fortunately, a pretty classmate succeeds in disrupting the all but inexorable pull of the digital world.

Duscha Kistler
Extended Reality: DOK Neuland 2018
In My Absence Niki Smit

Absence seizures are a type of epilepsy that affects mainly children and adolescents. Those affected are “absent” for a few seconds – often a hundred times a day.

In My Absence

(none)
Netherlands
2018
6 minutes

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Willemijn Cerutti
Niki Smit
Claynote
Rik de Rooij
Niki Smit
Claynote
Niek Vial, Abel Jansma, Caro Jacobs, Maartje Nevejan
Rik de Rooij
Inspector V
Monobanda, Joris Weijdom, Marieke Nooren
Monobanda
Niek Vial, Abel Jansma, Caro Jacobs, Maartje Nevejan
Maartje Nevejan, Monobanda
Joris Weijdom, Marieke Nooren
Niki Smit
Rik de Rooij
Niki Smit
Rik de Rooij
Absence seizures are a type of epilepsy that affects mainly children and adolescents. Those affected are “absent” for a few seconds – often a hundred times a day. Where are they during their absence? This multi-sensory VR experience is like a dream, offering insights into the protagonists’ worlds that are almost impossible to describe in words.

Lars Rummel, Marie Hinkelmann

Keeping & Saving – Or How to Live

Documentary Film
Netherlands
2018
85 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Monique Busman, Michiel van Erp
Digna Sinke
Jan Wich
Albert Elings
Digna Sinke
Mark Wessner
An old box full of various treasures: a bracelet made of chicken bones, a small paper fan in which razor blades used to be concealed, a beer mat carrying the signature of a crush. And a notebook with a few brown stains: “Right, I had a nosebleed.”

Director Digna Sinke knows that she likes to collect lots of stuff. But: “We have to tidy up, is what I read everywhere. A tidy home is a tidy life.” She’s attached to objects to which she in turn attaches wishes, hopes, passions – in brief, everything that makes up a human life. And she is not the only one. She meets persons with similar leanings everywhere. But also those who decided to get rid of everything. The director begins to realise that she is caught in an interim time. On the one hand there’s the material past, full of bric-a-brac, tangible stuff, ballast. On the other there’s the digital future with its clouds, collective owners, impersonal things. Sinke weighs both options against each other, examines her own tendency, her own attachment and the freedom of others that she doesn’t quite seem to trust but addresses with an open mind.

Carolin Weidner

Living the Light – Robby Müller

Documentary Film
Germany,
Netherlands
2018
87 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Carolijn Borgdorff, Alexander Wadouh, Sven Sauër
Claire Pijman
SQÜRL (Jim Jarmusch, Carter Logan)
Claire Pijman
Katharina Wartena
Claire Pijman
Robby Müller (1940–2018) was a luminary, but not in the way this term is commonly used. He could easily have played one of the wise and taciturn Indians in Jim Jarmusch’s Acid Western “Dead Man”. But that was impossible because he was the DOP of this film, for which he conjured his special, firm and almost painterly, but also transparent and shimmering light onto the screen, as he did for around 70 other masterpieces of international auteur cinema.

Over decades the cinematographer kept a video diary which the filmmaker Claire Pijman already worked with for the great exhibition “Master of Light” at the Amsterdam EYE Film Museum and which she now uses as the central pool of images for her own film, “Living the Light”. Fellow cinematographer Agnès Godard says about a sequence between Dennis Hopper and Nicholas Ray from Wim Wenders’ “The American Friend” that mastership for her is achieved only when the grandeur of the cinematography makes itself vanish from a scene because it becomes its natural component. Strange that one always feels that one can almost hear Robby Müller’s images. In “Living the Light”, this impression is underlined by delicately improvised soundscapes by Jim Jarmusch and Carter Logan.

Ralph Eue


Nominated for the Goethe-Institut Documentary Film Prize

Metalosis Maligna

Animated Film
Netherlands
2006
8 minutes
subtitles: 
No

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Floris Kaayk
Floris Kaayk
Lennert Busch
Simon Vickery
Floris Kaayk
Floris Kaayk
Floris Kaayk
Floris Kaayk
A film that goes under the skin: “Metalosis Maligna” is a disease that affects patients with medical implants. It occurs when, for example, a metal hip joint interacts badly with human tissue. The consequences are striking: the metal begins to grow and metastasize until it pierces and finally destroys the skin from inside.

Duscha Kistler

The Principal Wife

Documentary Film
Netherlands
2018
70 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Koert Davidse, Marc Thelosen
Hester Overmars
Diego van Uden
Jefrim Rothuizen
Ralf Verbeek
Hester Overmars
Diego van Uden
“The Principal Wife” is an impressive and moving demonstration of how to trace one’s family history even if no one is willing to talk about it. At its centre is the 38-year-old painter Marijke van der Meulen, whose mother Aagje left her and the family to join a Christian sect when her daughter was eight. Aagje became the wife of the sect leader, who manipulated his followers and was later convicted of child abuse. Marijke herself escaped the abuse but, without knowing exactly what really happened, is still haunted by traumatic memories of that time.

She comes up against a wall of silence with her questions. Family members and friends grudgingly agree to be interviewed but demand to remain anonymous. Marijke accepts. Henceforth the camera focuses only on her, showing emotions and fears, anger and sadness play over her face. Flanked by her artistic works, the creative stopgap becomes a cinematic godsend. Rarely has a film managed so intensely and thrillingly to be there when an individual recollects the story of her life and makes sense of what happened. At the end only one interview partner is left on Marijke’s list …

Luc-Carolin Ziemann

The Trial

Documentary Film
Netherlands
2018
127 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Sergei Loznitsa, Maria Choustova, Peter Warnier
Sergei Loznitsa
Danielius Kokanauskis
Sergei Loznitsa
Vladimir Golovnitski
The trial against the so-called “Industrial Party” took place in the fateful year of the USSR’s first five-year-plan, from 25 November to 7 December 1930. It was not the first show trial under Stalin but it was a crucial moment in history because the show worked and the political calculations paid off. While some of the accused at the Shakhty Trial in 1928 still denied their guilt, everybody involved here confessed, saw reason and showed remorse – completely, ardently, calling themselves “wreckers” and “saboteurs,” in short, “counter revolutionaries.” Consequently, “extreme measures” had to be taken – the thousands in court and the marchers in the streets agreed – for the purposes of “social security:” “death by firing squad.” That was the verdict after whose proclamation, to roaring applause, the crowds burst into tears of joy.

Every new film by Sergei Loznitsa makes one think that it doesn’t get eerier than that. And yet this time the horrors of Soviet rule crawl a bit further under the skin. The historical analyst of cinema combines his carefully researched and uncommented archival footage into a chamber play of rhetorical and directorial perfidiousness. And he reconstructs – necessarily brutal in its wealth of detail – the incident of an all-encompassing legal and political fabrication. An “Industrial Party” never existed …

Barbara Wurm

Western Wild … or How I Found Wanderlust and Met Old Shatterhand

Documentary Film
Netherlands
2018
9 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Martha Colburn
Martha Colburn
Martha Colburn
Martha Colburn
Martha Colburn
Martha Colburn
Martha Colburn
From the narrowness of the Wilhelmian empire, Karl May escaped into the vast expanses of a fantasy world inhabited by Indians. In the strange canyons of May’s life, Martha Colburn follows his tracks with a fantastically twisted collage animation and discovers autobiographical parallels: she grew up in the backwater of Biglerville, population 1,000 – which in 1863 became the secondary theatre of one of the bloodiest battles against the indigenous population and today is famous for donkey basketball.

André Eckardt