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Late Harvest
Marona’s Fantastic Tale Anca Damian

Marona-Sara-Ana-the-Ninth is of noble descent, but not a princess. She was given her names by her master and mistress. The modern fairytale about a dog raises questions of identity.

Marona’s Fantastic Tale

Animated Film
2019
92 minutes
subtitles: 
English
German
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Anca Damian
Anca Damian
Pablo Pico
Brecht Evens, Gina Thorstensen, Sarah Mazetti
Boubkar Benzabat
Dan Panaitescu, Chloé Roux, Hefang Wei, Mathieu Labaye, Claudia Ilea
Anghel Damian
Clément Badin
Marona-Sara-Ana-the-Ninth may be of noble descent from her father’s side, graceful and beautiful, but she is no princess. She braves many an adventure in her short life: She learns acrobatics and magic tricks, temporarily ends up on the streets and even becomes a saviour in need. She is a bitch. Her names were given to her by a number of masters and mistresses. Anca Damian tells a touching story with imagination and humour.

An original, surrealist and childlike aesthetics, the combination of different animation techniques, strong stylisation and the gay colour palette make the protagonists particularly expressive. The striking backgrounds resemble witty and artistic wimmelbook pictures. The unusual angles make us discover the urban hustle and bustle from many perspectives simultaneously – with all senses. At the heart of the film, a realistic and critical portrait of urban society emerges that does not shy away from questioning our relationship to animals and thus to our values. Joy and sadness, farewells and beginnings are mutually dependent – even death is sensitively addressed. Damian’s modern fairytale is about identity and belonging. Full of musical and visual poetry and philosophical esprit, it celebrates – equally simply and extravagantly – the complexity of existence and the simplicity of happiness.

Nadja Rademacher

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

The Royal Train

Documentary Film
2019
92 minutes
subtitles: 
English
German
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Johannes Rosenberger, Constantin Wulff, Johannes Holzhausen (Navigator Film), Ada Solomon, Diana Păroiu (HiFilm)
Johannes Holzhausen
Joerg Burger
Dieter Pichler
Johannes Holzhausen, Constantin Wulff
Andreas Hamza, Vlad Voinescu
A lost monarchy is represented by a princess whose steadfast mission is to restore to her dynasty real political and economic responsibility in contemporary Romania. With great energy, sometimes funny slips, too, but mostly with the appropriate royalist seriousness, Princess Margareta of Romania plays her role as the subject and object of her own campaign. The performance is of the tale of new wine in old wineskins. Surrounded by her courtly entourage, Margareta travels through “her” country in the same old royal train, on the same royal route, in which her father, King Michael the First already sought contact with his subjects. It goes without saying that the red carpet as the most obvious symbol of monarchist grandeur must be immaculate even at the tiniest stop – though this isn’t always achieved perfectly.

Director Johannes Holzhausen observes the bustle around this backwards journey with a distanced and wide-eyed curiosity. After all, it reveals a telling (a-)simultaneity of the ancient k.u.k. ceremonial and current marketing visions.

Ralph Eue

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Re-Visionen
Don’t Get Me Wrong Adina Pintilie

The protagonists or rather heroes of this first film by Adina Pintilie are inhabitants of a psychiatric home in Romania.

Don’t Get Me Wrong

Documentary Film
2007
50 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Dan Nutu (Aristoteles Workshop)
Adina Pintilie
Sorin Gociu
Ligia Smarandache
Adina Pintilie
Tudor Petre
The protagonists or rather heroes of this first film by Adina Pintilie are inhabitants of a psychiatric home in Romania. It’s taken for granted that God speaks here, and the “lunatics” very politely discuss who rules the rain. This debut film was celebrated all over the world as a poetical and political masterpiece and won the DOK Leipzig Golden Dove in 2007.

Ralph Eue

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Palace for the People

Documentary Film
2018
76 minutes
subtitles: 
English
German
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Martichka Bozhilova, Thomas Tielsch, Velvet Moraru
Boris Missirkov, Georgi Bogdanov
Boris Missirkov, Georgi Bogdanov
Ema Konstantinova
Boris Missirkov, Georgi Bogdanov
Momchil Bozhkov
Today we see them with a tourist’s eye – or we don’t see them at all, like the Palace of the Republic in Berlin. “Palace for the People” visits five emblematic buildings of the socialist era: massive stone bodies, whose facades and interiors, configuration of rooms and furniture, decor and functionality invariably aimed for the representation of political systems and values. Superlative power buildings – some shooting up high like the Lomonosov University in Moscow, some sprawling like Ceauşescu’s palace in Bucharest.

Guided tours are always a form of return, a kind of retrospective, the affective connection to what is gone. With a sharp eye for historic architectural quirks and characteristic features, Georgi Bogdanov and Boris Missirkov take us to places that are, however historical they may seem, still haunted by the ghosts of the visions they were once built for. Places soaked with futures that never materialised or materialised quite differently from what was envisioned.

Lukas Stern


Nominated for the Goethe-Institut Documentary Film Prize and the MDR Film Prize


The screening on 31 October, 17:00, is a special screening supported by MDR.

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

The Call

Animated Film
2018
10 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Anca Damian
Anca Damian
Ciprian Cimpoi
Sergiu Negulici, Ioana Laura Nicoară
Anca Damian
Clément Badin, Lionel Guenoun
Her son’s daily phone call and taking regular baths are among an elderly woman’s favourite pastimes. She finds lightness by immersing herself in the water. The memories weighing her down disappear. Will she resurface to answer her son’s phone call? A creative short film full of powerful images that dives into the spheres of different animation techniques – and of existence. A poetic stream of thoughts about transience.

Annina Wettstein

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Touch Me Not

Documentary Film
2018
123 minutes
subtitles: 
German
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Bianca Oana, Philippe Avril, Adina Pintilie
Adina Pintilie
Ivo Paunov
George Chiper-Lillemark
Adina Pintilie
Adina Pintilie
Veselin Zografov, Dominik Dolejší, Marek Poledna
The Einstürzende Neubauten are playing “Mela-Mela-Melancholia”, questioning the state of the nation. Between the somnambulistic scenes played out in the border area between documentary and fiction, deep-seated intimacies that concern us all are addressed. The project – the winner of this year’s Golden Bear – is experimental: many of the protagonists are “real”, play themselves; others, like Laura Benson and her fellow actor Tómas Lemarquis, pick up on scripted sketches but let their roles come so close that they penetrate their own lives. They talk about and perform sex, about inhibitions and visions, fears and ways to overcome them. Their goal, the goal of this unusual film: (self) liberation.

The director enters the frame occasionally, sits on the couch with Christian Bayerlein, the “kissability” blogger, or with the transsexual Hanna Hofmann, letting us know that she is taking part, looking at things but resisting voyeurism as the camera floats above a group BDSM session or follows a touch therapy workshop, some of whose participants are physically severely disabled, at close range. She speaks, too, about her own boundaries of shame, far removed from the “Likes”-obsessed narcissistic Social Media egos. A transgressive critique of norms, aesthetically and politically correct (which is a good thing). And extremely bold into the bargain.

Barbara Wurm

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Licu, a Romanian Story

Documentary Film
2017
86 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Ana Dumitrescu, Jonathan Boissay
Ana Dumitrescu
Ana Dumitrescu
Ana Dumitrescu
Jonathan Boissay
At the age of 92, Liviu Canţer, called Licu, has lived through the extremes of the 20th century in his home country of Romania – as an alert eye witness of the World War, expulsions, Ceauşescu’s industrialisation and surveillance, the revolution of 1989 and the corrupt post-communism at the margins of the EU, he has a lot of stories to tell. But being one of the last survivors of his generation he lacks contemporaries with whom he can share his experiences. Director Ana Dumitrescu takes time for him and his recollections. She keeps visiting Licu with her camera over the seasons. She films him in his house, where the family history is always present. Slowly the two develop a relationship – in the course of the film she turns from invisible observer to a visitor for whom Licu cooks and whom he offers homemade schnapps. He displays his photo archive. The happy and sad days are fairly balanced, but a certain resignation is obvious.

Dumitrescu, who grew up as a Romanian in France, creates an epic space for the history of her native country, at the centre of which we find Licu: a personal fate representing the tide of history. The black and white images, shot with minimum equipment, reveal her sensitivity as a photo journalist, which enables us to immerse ourselves in this man’s world.

Sirkka Möller



Golden Dove International Competition (long);
Nominated for MDR Film Prize

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Cabbage, Potatoes and Other Demons

Documentary Film
2016
62 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Alex Iordăchescu, Șerban Georgescu, Heino Deckert
Șerban Georgescu
Vlad Blîndu
Bogdan Slăvescu
Șerban Georgescu
Șerban Georgescu
Alex Iosub
In the small town of Lunguleţu in Southern Romania there are around 1,000 farmers who own the same number of tractors and produce 100,000 tons of cabbage and potatoes per year. Every one of these thousand farmers will then stand on the local market square in summer after the potato harvest and in late autumn after the cabbage harvest, sacks of cabbage and potatoes piled up in huge pyramids as far as the eye can see. Any attempt to make a profit by selling the produce is, of course, in vain in view of this absurd overproduction. The diligent farmers underbid each other until they end up either losing money or ploughing the harvest under right away.

When director Şerban Georgescu buys a ton of white cabbage for his mother for 20 Euros here, he begins to wonder and decides to spend a year in Lunguleţu and cultivate cabbage and potatoes himself. He investigates why the farmers voluntarily enter this economic dead end. Even though the mayor and a few villagers have some good ideas for finding a way out of this misery, a common solution is not in sight. The suspicion among them sits deep and the fear of any kind of cooperative is great – the memories of expropriation under Ceauşescu are still too fresh, potential success by competition seems too tempting, even if they are threatened by bankruptcy every day.

Lina Dinkla

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Cinema, Mon Amour

Documentary Film
2015
74 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Tudor Giurgiu
Alexandru Belc
Tudor Vladimir Panduru
Ion Ioachim Stroe
Alexandru Belc, Tudor Giurgiu
Vlad Voinescu
Victor Purice definitely deserves a medal as a “Hero of Socialist Labour”. Witnessing the desperation, the vigour, the persistence with which he keeps fighting for his cinema brings tears to the eyes. The “Dacia” Panorama Film Theatre, somewhere in the Romanian province, a concrete beauty with several hundred seats, a good-sized foyer and solid 35 mm projection equipment is on the brink of failure. It shares the fate of many Romanian cinemas; there are less than 30 left. The others were privatised, sold off, turned into amusement arcades or discotheques, even the film studio sold many of them. What nonsense – just as we are celebrating the new golden age of Romanian cinema in our part of the world!

But Victor Purice and the small staff he has left will not be driven out of their dream cinema that easily. They live and cook among film reels, turn the foyer into a table tennis hall and watch a Hollywood blockbuster alone, if need be. All this is narrated affectionately and full of admiration for this modern Don Quixote who is fighting mismanagement, digital progress and a broken heating system. The price he pays is high. It’s to be feared that this story will not have a happy ending. Mission: Impossible.

Cornelia Klauß

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

The Magic Mountain

Animadoc
2015
87 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Anca Damian, Guillaume de Seille, Joanna Ronnikier
Anca Damian
Alexander Balanescu
Ion Ioachim Stroe
Theodore Ushev, Sergiu Negulici, Raluca Popa, Dan Panaitescu and Tomek Ducki
Anca Damian, Anna Winkler
Frédéric Théry, Sebastian Wlodarczyk

“Sometimes I feel I wasn’t made for these times.” This laconic statement of the protagonist of Anca Damian’s second animated documentary defines his position early in the narrative: somehow off kilter. Adam Jacek Winkler, Polish photographer, anti-communist dissident, mountain climber and artist, is a restless spirit, always on the lookout for the noble cause worth fighting and dying for. A modern Don Quixote, whose obsession takes him to Afghanistan where he joins the Mujahidin’s fight against the Red Army. It’s a romantic and torn hero the director portrays here, combining material from Winkler’s personal archive (photos, sketches, videos) with the stylistic wealth of artistic animation, including collages, graphically distorted film and photo material, drawings, plasticine animations or simply painted paper folded into mountains. The various techniques address the various situations, managing to translate the protagonist’s emotional world into a highly original filmic reality, sometimes surreal, sometimes absurd and bitter. “The Magic Mountain” is the second part of a planned trilogy about modern heroes whose third and last instalment this cinematic experience gives us every reason to look forward to. Mattias Heeder





MDR Film Prize 2015


The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Toto and His Sisters

Documentary Film
2014
93 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Bianca Oana, Valeriu Nicolae, Catalin Mitulescu, Marcian Lazar, Hanka Kastelicova, Carmen Harabagiu, Antony Root
Alexander Nanau
Alexander Nanau
Alexander Nanau, George Cragg, Mircea Olteanu
Alexander Nanau
Matthias Lempert, Florian Ardelean
The faces of the three siblings living in a run-down flat in Bucharest’s Roma ghetto are serious. Their mother is in prison for drug dealing. Their father has vanished. The uncle who is supposed to take care of the children has turned the flat into a meeting point for the neighbourhood junkies, getting his niece hooked in the process. If you expect a Roma, poverty, horror portrait now, hold your horses. Alexander Nanau, Emmy winner in 2010, is interested in a much deeper question: how do you escape from a life predetermined by social marginalisation?
Toto, at 10 the youngest child of this torn family, finds refuge in a youth centre, spending more and more time in this place where a whole new world is opening up for him. A world that welcomes and supports him and shows him a way out of this nightmare through education. For a brief moment things seem to take a turn for the better for the kids. But then their living conditions strike back.
Nanau has found a quiet, bright hero in Toto and an increasingly confident young woman who demands responsibility in his sister Andrea. Both embody a chance to cheat their predetermined fate. This makes “Toto and His Sisters”, however bleak it may be at times, a surprisingly hopeful film.

Matthias Heeder



Awarded with a Honorary Mention in the International Competition Documentary Film, the Prize of the Trade Union ver.di and the Ecumenical Jury Award 2014

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

As You Like It

Documentary Film
2013
22 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Ioana Lascăr
Paula Oneţ
Tudor Petre
Paula Oneţ
Paula Oneţ
Paula Oneţ
Rudolf Costin, Manuela Borza, Ioana Ţurcan
There’s no time like the present, would be a good description of a phenomenon Paula Oneţ came across in the region of Cluj in Romania, which made her curious. Women and men in the second half of their lives but still quite hale and hearty are intensely concerned about the photo that’s to be mounted on their own headstone – not as a hypothetical issue, but as a very concrete undertaking.
Visits to the hairdresser are made, photo shootings scheduled, serious discussions had over headstones which, though the owner is still very much alive, are already standing on the graves, decorated with flowers and wreathes. The headstone, including a carefully produced and selected portrait, is a status symbol during one’s lifetime. And it’s the – evidently – vain attempt to determine how you want to be remembered by posterity. But what may seem an eccentric and possibly bothersome task at first glance actually shows a healthy, fear-free attitude to one’s own death.
“As You Like It” is an entertaining reflection about our earthly existence and the human need to understand one’s inevitable demise as a part of life.

Lina Dinkla

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

24 Buckets, 7 Mice, 18 Years

Documentary Film
2012
30 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Pintilie Adina, Manekino Film
Iacob Marius
Marius Iacob
Marius Iacob, Vlad Voinescu
Marius Iacob
Vlad Voinescu
Numbers figure prominently in the lives of the Hungarian-Romanian charcoal burners Piroska and Imre – just like the wireless, the Caribbean and a booming poverty tourism industry. The young directors Iacob Marius and Vlad Voinescu mix these ingredients with a light touch and a sure sense of drama.
Imre and Piroska spend their summers in a forest in Transylvania piling up pyramids of wood that will travel to the whole of Europe as charcoal. Which means it travels further than the couple who live in a rundown railway car with no electricity and spend their evenings listening to radio features about distant countries and discussing the perfect lottery numbers. The world regularly visits them in the shape of tourists wheeled in on horse carts – how authentic! – and willing to pay a small consideration for permission to take pictures of real Eastern European poverty, preferably featuring themselves posing with the shovel. Piroska and Imre take it with a sense of humour and prefer to think about the problem of transforming 230 bags of coal into the lottery ticket that will take them to the beach of their dreams – one day.
A smart reflection on the allegedly documentary view, for the affluent citizen feels deliciously horrified, fills his memory card with photos and decamps. Left behind in their authentic filth, the others must continue to hope for a miracle – or the right number.

– Grit Lemke

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

FilmFestival Cottbus
Crulic - The Path to Beyond Anca Damian

The true story of a man who got tangled up and perished in the red tape of European bureaucracy. A masterfully animated ballad about the decline of humanity.

Crulic - The Path to Beyond

Animadoc
2011
73 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Anca Damian, Aparte Film
Anca Damian
Ilija Zogowski
Catalin Cristutiu
Anca Damian
This highly original animated documentary reconstructs the true (!) story of an individual who gets caught up in the wheels of the murderous European bureaucratic machine. The director illuminates the dark side of the system in her second feature-length production using various animation techniques: hand drawn images, photo collages, computer trickery, plasticine figures and occasional slightly modified stock footage. One particularly distinctive feature: the main protagonist narrates and reconstructs his own life and death similar to Joe Gillis (William Holden) in Billy Wilder’s legendary feature film SUNSET BOULEVARD (1950). When Daniel Claudiu Crulic (voiced by actor Vlad Ivanov) begins his tale, he has in fact already passed away. The thirty three year old Romanian died in 2008 in a Polish prison while on hunger strike, having been accused of a crime he couldn’t possibly have committed and then dismissed by the bureaucratic machine as worthless.
This sophisticated montage, combining imagery and audio, lends this ballad of the decay of humanity and the omnipotence of boundless greed a delightful rhythm and tremendous pull, from which emerges an in equal measure unsettling and harrowing warning: a Europe, in which public authorities and civil servants prefer to sidestep responsibilities and in which the individual doesn't count for anything, makes for a life not worth living.

– Peter Claus, Katalog Cottbus

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

International Programme
Stremt 89 Anda Puscas, Dragos Dulea

What do you need for a revolution? Lots of alcohol, a few sickles and shotguns and an opponent in the cornfield... Autum 1989 in the Carpathian Mountains, straight from the source.

Stremt 89

Documentary Film
2012
14 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Anda Puscas, UNATC
Anda Puscas, Dragos Dulea
Stephen James Wilkinson
Anda Puscas
Dragos Dulea
Dragos Dulea
Never heard of Stremt? But you can learn how to stage a revolution from the small Romanian village near Cluj-Napoca in the Carpathian Mountains. It doesn’t take carnations or the colour orange but, first of all, alcohol for Dutch courage. Only then do you set out, arm yourself and suddenly identify enemies and terrorists everywhere – or was it the other way round? Time passes more slowly in Stremt. After they saw Ceauşescu’s fall on television, some villagers felt that their hour had come and decided to rebel. But where do you start a revolt when everyone knows everyone else? The ensuing dramatic scenes were mainly due to the wild conjecture and rumours that spread suddenly – and the fact that no one was hurt was mainly due to the fact that the pistol wasn’t loaded. The two young filmmakers’, born in 1985 and 1989, short film is a merry tour de force that demonstrates how quickly a house of card collapses once fear has been conquered.
– Cornelia Klauß

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.