Film Archive

International Programme 2017
Harmony Lidia Sheinin

Grandmother needs nursing now and so five of the younger family members take command. A film about being old, a child, a mother and about sad farewells – to things, to life.

Harmony

Documentary Film
Russia
2017
62 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Lidia Sheinin
Lidia Sheinin
Lidia Sheinin
Lidia Sheinin
Lidia Sheinin, Makar Akhpashev, Andrey Fonin, Pavel Doreuli
It’s difficult to decide whether one should resent the slightly-built grandma for being grumpy. Her granddaughter is moving in to cook and care for her. But she is trailing four little children who brazenly hog the tiny average Soviet-era flat, crawl under their great-grandmother’s feet, leave crumbs everywhere and vividly demonstrate the modern school of educational methods. Babushka becomes a stranger in her own home. She tidies and mops up (after them) – it’s a miracle she never stumbles over the stretched woollen threads and diapered bottoms that are everywhere –, she whines and scolds. But the tears only start to flow when her beloved piano is to be “liquidated”, as she puts it …

Lidia Sheinin captures the emotional oscillations in this daily family chaos with a sure sense of closeness and distance. She surveys generations and attitudes in the smallest spaces, studies characters and relationships – and creates, in the midst of this frenzy, almost infinite zones of reflection about what ties us to each other.

Barbara Wurm


Nominated for MDR Film Prize
International Programme 2017
Of Huge and Small Artem Funk

The question is not whether we’re afraid. The question is what we do when we’re afraid, says the activist Zhanna, who lives in Murmansk and has been classified as a “hostile agent” by the security forces for the past few years.

Of Huge and Small

Documentary Film
Germany,
Russia
2017
25 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Artem Funk
Artem Funk
Artem Funk
Artem Funk
Artem Funk
Artem Funk
The question is not whether we’re afraid. The question is what we do when we’re afraid, says the activist Zhanna, who lives in Murmansk and has been classified as a “hostile agent” by the security forces for the past few years. Zhanna lives with her fear and still speaks out about the present political situation – in Russia and elsewhere. It’s the only way she can reassure herself that we ourselves are writing our story.

Luc-Carolin Ziemann