Film Archive

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International Programme 2018
Days of Madness Damian Nenadić

Maja and Mladen have lived and suffered through a long-term addiction to psychotropic drugs. In video diary format “Days of Madness” depicts their attempt to win back control of their lives.

Days of Madness

Documentary Film
Croatia,
Slovenia
2018
74 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Oliver Sertić
Damian Nenadić
Miro Manojlović, Filip Sertić
Maja Šćukanec, Mladen Bađun, Damian Nenadić, Srđan Kovačević
Sandra Bastašić
Martin Semenčić
Kventiax, Seroquel, Rivotril, Prazine, Normabel … When Mladen and Maja, in a mix of detachment and anger, list the psychoactive substances that determine their lives and ruin their bodies with toxic side effects, it’s as if they were talking about terribly annoying family members. On top of their long medical history full of spells in hospitals there’s the fact that the real family members, whether long buried at the local cemetery or in the shape of parents scolding them from the next room, won’t surcease them either. In close cooperation with Mladen and Maja, who portray themselves in diary-like video recordings, Damian Nenadić shows two people who were left alone by society in their distress – or whose distress was caused by the latter in the first place. Maja’s borderline personality disorder was diagnosed as a consequence of her transgender identity. Mladen, who returned from the Yugoslavian war with depression, was first sent to a priest by his parents. “Days of Madness” depicts their gradual attempts to win back a little control of a life stolen by psychiatry, family and church. “Why is BPD a disorder and nationalism is not?”

Esther Buss


Nominated for the MDR Film Prize

Kein Ende

Documentary Film
Germany,
Slovenia
2018
6 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Jakob Krese
Jakob Krese, Meta Krese
Jakob Krese
Gaston Ibaroulle
An ocean crossing. The travellers are surrounded by the horizon, encircled by the beginning and the end at the same time. Motion-blurred photo portraits of the passengers, superimposed by a woman’s voice. She communicates a confidence that must prove itself over and over against doubts, for she promises the children that there will be no end, even if there’s a war going on. The precise language of the Slovenian poet Maruša Krese is carefully interwoven with the poetic images of the photographer Meta Krese.

André Eckardt