Film Archive

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International Programme 2018
Curiosity and Control Albin Biblom

People are fascinated by wild beasts. The modes of presenting them cover a spectrum from artfully designed dioramas in museums to more modern and humane zoos.

Curiosity and Control

Documentary Film
Sweden
2018
58 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Adam Marko-Nord, Sara Waldestam
Albin Biblom
Goran Kajfes, David Österberg
Albin Biblom
Bernhard Winkler
Albin Biblom
David Österberg
In the 19th century, dioramas were a kind of predecessor of the movies. Taxidermy animals from distant countries were to be presented in the most lifelike environments possible. The US scientist and sculptor Carl Akeley is considered the father of taxidermy. He created groundbreaking dioramas for the New York Museum of Natural History in the early 20th century. In the 1920s he was the first man to film mountain gorillas and changed from hunter to dedicated animal protectionist. His biography reflects both the social changes in our attitude to animals and technical progress.

Based on a portrait of the pioneering Akeley, “Curiosity and Control” addresses the different ways animals are presented in natural history museums and zoos, critically exploring various perspectives. What is man’s relation to the fauna? It’s marked by curiosity and control: the former drove early scientists to collect, own, and systematise animals since the early expeditions – and preserve them from extinction. Ownership, however, also generates dominance. Is it permissible to keep other species in cages? No matter how “natural” and humane the zoo architecture is: “You will see something that looks like an elephant. But it’s not behaving like a wild elephant,” a zoo director says. Another dilemma.

Annina Wettstein

Exit

Documentary Film
Germany,
Norway,
Sweden
2018
80 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Eirin Gjørv
Karen Winther
Michel Wenzer
Peter Ask
Robert Stengård
Karen Winther
Yvonne Stenberg, Gisle Tveito
When Karen Winther comes across a few old boxes during a move she finds herself confronted with her past. On top are some swastika stickers, next to a tape labelled “Blitz” and “Hits”, and a lot of stuff decorated with the imperial eagle. Twenty years ago she joined a right-wing extremist organisation in Norway, looking for adventure and like-minded people. “It’s embarrassing to look at,” she comments in the voice over.

“Exit” is her film, her story, and yet the plot soon points in other directions, refuses to be constrained by its own structure. Winther travels to the US to meet women who also used to move in right-wing extremist circles. She sits in the car with a former left-wing extremist activist, talking about a formative encounter many years ago. She meets Ingo Hasselbach, “The Führer of Berlin”, whose career in the East German neo-Nazi scene is the subject of Winfried Bonengel’s film “Führer Ex”. And she meets a former jihadist who served a sentence in a Paris prison. In addition to surprisingly similar motivations and experiences, what they all have in common are the difficulties caused by their “Exits” – feelings of guilt, but also threats from still active members.

Carolin Weidner


Awarded with the Goethe-Institut Documentary Film Prize, the Young Eyes Film Award and the Gedanken-Aufschluss Prize from the Jury of juvenile and yound adult prisoners of JSA Regis-Breitingen

International Programme 2018
IKEA for YU Marija Ratković Vidaković, Dinka Radonić

The identity history of Yugoslavia and ex-Yugoslavia is rife with conflicts and contradictions. Marija travels through this history by researching the inner workings of her own family.

IKEA for YU

Documentary Film
Croatia,
Sweden
2018
52 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Vera Robić Škarica, Marija Ratković Vidaković
Marija Ratković Vidaković, Dinka Radonić
Siniša Krneta
Dinka Radonić
Damir Čučić
Marija Ratković Vidaković, Dinka Radonić
Johan Bodin, Siniša Krneta
A family selfie in front of the “Three Fists”, a monument to the victims of the Second World War in Niš, the third largest city in Serbia today. Three concrete fists from the era of Titoism, are raised to the sky: the father’s fist, the mother’s, a child’s. Marija takes position, her mother and father next to her, her brother presses the button. This photo records nothing less than the whole identity history of Yugoslavia and Ex-Yugoslavia, rich in conflicts and contradictions – a history that still resonates and that Marija Ratković Vidaković, supported by her co-writer Dinka Radonić, investigates in this intimate family film.

Marked by parents and grandparents who have internalised the real-socialist ideas and values of the Tito era on the Balkan, the thirty three-year-old filmmaker must cope with a paradoxical inherited identity that has very little to do with her private world and life in Croatia. Marija knows that she doesn’t want to pass this heritage on to her son and she knows that in order to achieve this, it must wither in herself. Filmed over years, “IKEA for YU” is the testimony of a trip into her own family history, deep into its most intimate nooks and crannies where a long history full of twists and turns is deeply entrenched. And a trip far away from Croatia.

Lukas Stern


Nominated for the MDR Film Prize

Retrospective 2018
In the Ruhr Region Peter Nestler

A look back from the present of 1968 to the communist labour disputes of the 1920s – in conversations with the last contemporary witnesses in the Ruhr Region.

In the Ruhr Region

Documentary Film
Sweden
1967
34 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Sveriges Radio AB
Peter Nestler
A look back from the present of 1968 to the communist labour disputes of the 1920s – in conversations with the last contemporary witnesses in the Ruhr Region.

Ralph Eue
International Programme 2018
Lyubov – Love in Russian Staffan Julén, Svetlana Alexievich

Nobel Prize laureate Svetlana Alexievich interviews people on the subject of “Love is …,” which is difficult to answer, especially when you’re talking about yourself – which is precisely what happens here.

Lyubov – Love in Russian

Documentary Film
Sweden
2017
90 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Johan Lijleström Seth
Staffan Julén, Svetlana Alexievich
Majaq Julén Brännström
Åsa Mossberg, Rasmus Nyholm Schmidt, Staffan Julén
“Love is …” the stickers used to say, bordered by hearts – gewgaws. In this film, however, the question is asked by a personality who stands out from the sundries of world literature because she listens to the “simple people”, records their individual patterns of speech and in the end combines them in a kaleidoscope of voices. The Belarusian writer Svetlana Alexievich approached “red”, “socialist man” and his ideas with this method and was awarded the Nobel Prize.

Now she is on the track of universal issues, interviewing her compatriots about love and relationships. A well-meant question, and difficult to answer. At one point she concludes that the book about death and age will probably be easier because people seem reluctant to talk about happiness. But of course that’s wrong. It’s amazing how the interviewees open up, whether happy or unhappy in love. They lie down in the beds of their deceased spouses for whom they danced the tango. They still rave about their partner’s grey KGB suit. They dedicate their life to a handicapped child that’s not their own. They go for walks that last hours and catch cystitis because a lavatory is nowhere to be found. Another kaleidoscope of an idea, another elegant cross section of (ex-Soviet) society.

Barbara Wurm
Retrospective 2018
Sightseeing Peter Nestler

What belongs together does not come together here: a peaceful stroll through Stockholm and a pamphlet by Peter Weiss against the Vietnam War.

Sightseeing

Documentary Film
Sweden
1968
10 minutes
subtitles: 
No

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Sveriges Radio-TV
Peter Nestler
Peter Nestler, Arne Palm
Peter Nestler
Peter Nestler, Peter Weiss
What belongs together does not come together here: a peaceful stroll through Stockholm and a pamphlet by Peter Weiss against the Vietnam War.

Ralph Eue

The Burden

Animated Film
Sweden
2017
14 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Kalle Wettre
Niki Lindroth von Bahr
Hans Appelqvist
Niki Lindroth von Bahr
Niki Lindroth von Bahr
Niki Lindroth von Bahr
A shopping mall is the setting of this dark and bizarre musical starring animals. At the Hotel Stay Long, the call centre, the fast food restaurant and the supermarket, guests and employees bemoan their existential fears, their loneliness, the empty promises of consumerism and the time wasted on them. If only the burden was taken from their shoulders!

Duscha Kistler
International Programme 2018
Vox Lipoma Jane Magnusson, Liv Strömquist

Must great artists be flawless as persons? And if the opposite is the case: what does that take away from their art? An animated portrait of director Ingmar Bergman.

Vox Lipoma

Animated Film
Sweden
2018
11 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Cecilia Nessen
Jane Magnusson, Liv Strömquist
Lars Kumlin, Jonas Beckman
Johan Sonestedt, Paulina Brink, Veronica Wallenberg, Aurora Febo, Henrik Stensnäs, Sanny Serinkaya Vestmalm
Jane Magnusson, Liv Strömquist
Annika Hedlund
Must great artists be flawless as persons? Upright art lovers may prefer it, but sometimes the world just doesn’t work this way. While we ordinary mortals have only a tiny little voice that just won’t stop whispering in our ear that we could be better persons (if only we wanted!), Ingmar Bergman has a talking lipoma on his right cheek – a terrible nuisance. At least as annoying as Ingmar himself. Animated blasphemy, as good as it gets!

Ralph Eue