Film Archive

International Programme 2018
Bay of Plenty Milva Stutz

Yellow, living mass meets on a platform in the ocean. Its primary and secondary sexual characteristics turn out to be transformative. A strange erotic game begins.

Bay of Plenty

Animated Film
Switzerland
2018
12 minutes
subtitles: 
_without dialogue / subtitles

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Milva Stutz
Milva Stutz
Lucia Cadotsch, Ludwig Wandinger
Milva Stutz, David Schlatter
Milva Stutz, David Schlatter
Milva Stutz
Lucia Cadotsch, Ludwig Wandinger
The tiny island in the ocean becomes a meeting place for two strange yellow figures. They shake their bums and stretch their breasts, sexual characteristics shift, dissolve, re-grow. A continuous transformation that also seems to produce new creatures. Suddenly all are in an ecstasy of love, cuddling and sucking a variety of protuberances, a great amalgamation seems imminent. Equally sexy and bizarre.

Carolin Weidner

Chris the Swiss

Documentary Film
Croatia,
Finland,
Germany,
Switzerland
2018
90 minutes
subtitles: 
English
German

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Samir (Dschoint Ventschr), Siniša Juričić (Nukleus Film), Heino Deckert (Ma.ja.de.), Iikka Vehkalahti (IV Films Ltd / p.s.72 productions)
Anja Kofmel
Marcel Vaid
Simon Guy Fässler
Stefan Kälin
Simon Eltz
Anja Kofmel
Daniel Hobi, Marco Teufen, Hrvoje Petek
Christian Würtenberg died in Croatia in 1992. Even though the young Swiss had come as a journalist, he was wearing the uniform of an international militia that fought on the Croatian side in the civil war. Why he took up arms has long remained a mystery. His cousin, the filmmaker Anja Kofmel, has confronted the question.

She interviews companions, complementing the documentary footage with dark, pared-down animated sequences which form the film’s narrative structure. Diving deeply into the political turmoil, the film portrays Chris’s path towards joining a group of nationalist mercenaries supported by Opus Dei. A politically explosive film even today, a visually impressive thriller that shows how quickly a person’s attitude can be devastated by war.

Luc-Carolin Ziemann


Nominated for the Goethe-Institut Documentary Film Prize and the MDR Film Prize; Swiss Film Award 2019: Best Documentary, Best Score, Best Editing

International Programme 2018
Eisenberger – Kunst muss schön sein, sagt der Frosch zur Fliege Hercli Bundi

The Austrian artist Christian Eisenberger has produced around 45,000 artworks so far. A body of work that constitutes a challenge for the artworld.

Eisenberger – Kunst muss schön sein, sagt der Frosch zur Fliege

Documentary Film
Switzerland
2018
94 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Peter Zwierko
Hercli Bundi
Daniel Almada
Adrian Stähli, Aurelio Buchwalder, Christian Eisenberger, Hercli Bundi
Nela Märki
Hercli Bundi
Patrick Becker, Matthias Hefel, Hercli Bundi
“Art is just a social pretext,” says Austrian artist Christian Eisenberger while showing the filmmaker Hercli Bundi his latest series of pictures which is based on porn film sequences. That’s part of the “big circus of humanity,” he says he told an outraged friend.

A look into Eisenberger’s studio shows a – to the beholder – hopelessly tangled pile of works in different stages. The carton figures he started with “were for many years just thrown away.” Today Eisenberger is glad when he can send a bunch of artworks off to his gallerist and make room in his studio. His oeuvre is estimated to comprise around 45,000 works. Eisenberger acknowledges the artworld with its galleries, fairs and museums with a shrug, but also with a certain talent for self-marketing. As long as he can continue, whether at the studio or in an enamel factory. “Do not put your hands into the machine while it is operating!” a yellowed sign on his workshop wall says. That probably goes for the artist, too.

Fabian Tietke
International Programme 2018
Immer und Ewig Fanny Bräuning

A couple, both in their late sixties, who travel through Europe in a caravan refurbished as a mobile nursing home room. Director Fanny Bräuning has devoted a deeply intimate film to her parents.

Immer und Ewig

Documentary Film
Switzerland
2018
85 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Thomas Thümena
Fanny Bräuning
Olivia Pedroli
Pierre Mennel
Catrin Vogt
Fanny Bräuning
Patrick Becker, Jean-Pierre Gerth
“Only” a love story. “Only” a film about attachment, entwinement, reliability, trust. A couple, both in their late 60s, who travel Europe in a caravan refurbished as a mobile nursing room despite the fact that the woman has MS. He, a former photographer who gave up his job because it was incompatible with taking care of his wife. She, a former painter and graphic designer who returned to life from a coma, albeit paralysed from the neck down.

Her face is radiant as she talks about how much she loves looking out of the window on their drives, even if there’s nothing but the highway outside. He demonstrates with restrained admiration for the technical innovations how the built-in hospital bed can be adjusted to several sleeping positions. Dreamy pragmatism, compatible with daily life – everything, always, regardless. Director Fanny Bräuning has dedicated a deeply intimate film to her parents. In conversations with them she tells the story of a love that weathered all crises.

Fabian Tietke

The Apollo of Gaza

Documentary Film
Canada,
Switzerland
2018
78 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Philippe Coeytaux, Colette Loumède
Nicolas Wadimoff
Claude Fradette
Franck Rabel
Christine Hoffet
Nicolas Wadimoff, Béatrice Guelpa
Carlos Ibañez Diaz
In August 2013, a more than 2,000 year old bronze statue of Apollo turned up in Gaza. A Palestinian fisherman is said to have discovered the 750 kg statue on the ocean floor and, with a lot of effort, recovered it. Photos showing the well-preserved, greenishly shimmering god of light, the arts, medicine and oracles lying on a cloth with a Smurf pattern began to circulate. Though only a few saw the “Apollo of Gaza” with their own eyes, it instantly became an object of mercantile and geopolitical interests and speculations. There were offers and bids, negotiations with museums, suspicions and wild rumours. Then the statue suddenly disappeared, seized by the Hamas government – that’s what people say before they add that they’re not at liberty to discuss the matter.

“The Apollo of Gaza” traces the story of a spectacular find of, if nothing else, some symbolic political weight in a mixture of mystery and investigative research. What’s left at the end are the hopes of a region marked by war and blockades that expects the beautiful bronze god to enable them to reconnect with a buried cultural past.

Esther Buss