Film Archive

Jahr

Countries (Film Archive)

Film Unlimited
6:30 Collection

A mass society sends masses of letters, which are now sorted, classified and sent on their way at assembly lines and with the help of machines. The film follows this process with barely concealed enthusiasm. It is considered to be the first documentary that uses only live sound, while demonstrating that sound is capable of much more than just “documentation” ...

UK

UK
1934

6:30 Collection

Animadoc
UK
1934
15 minutes
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
John Grierson, GPO Film Unit
J. D. Davidson
Harry Watt
J. Cox
A mass society sends masses of letters, which are now sorted, classified and sent on their way at assembly lines and with the help of machines. The film follows this process with barely concealed enthusiasm. It is considered to be the first documentary that uses only live sound, while demonstrating that sound is capable of much more than just “documentation”. Note the visual-sound-editing, especially the credit motif, which was recorded by the whole studio staff (including Grierson and Wright) using various props like a beer bottle, a projection machine and sand paper.

---Grit Lemke

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Film Unlimited
A Colour Box

When the young Norman McLaren saw “A Colour Box”, he knew that this was exactly what he wanted to do. Made without a camera and drawn directly on the celluloid ...

UK

UK
1935

A Colour Box

Animadoc
UK
1935
4 minutes
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
John Grierson, GPO Film Unit
Don Baretto and his Cuban Orchestra
When the young Norman McLaren saw “A Colour Box”, he knew that this was exactly what he wanted to do. Made without a camera and drawn directly on the celluloid, the success of this film (even though audiences first were shocked and jeered at it) established direct animation as a technique of its own. The slightly jazzy, dancing promotion of the Post Office at the end may have served to justify the production of such a work by a government institution, but Grierson explicitly considered such films as an enrichment of the GPO canon.

---Grit Lemke

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Film Unlimited
Hell Unltd Norman McLaren, Helen Biggar

Norman McLaren, who made this film as a young member of the Communist Party and when he was more or less an amateur, later called it his only “social documentary”. The mixture of live action, drawn and ...

UK

UK
1936

Hell Unltd

Animadoc
UK
1936
20 minutes
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Norman McLaren, Helen Biggar
Norman McLaren, who made this film as a young member of the Communist Party and when he was more or less an amateur, later called it his only “social documentary”. The mixture of live action, drawn and object animation achieved a certain fame, despite – or perhaps because – a very simple, often superficial symbolism which left no doubt about its hatred of imperialism and war.

---Grit Lemke

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Film Unlimited
Love on the Wing

This film manifested Norman McLaren’s experimental and unique work for the GPO. He mixes surrealist backdrops with silhouettes of famous buildings and a story drawn on the film whose individual frames keep melting into ...

UK

UK
1938

Love on the Wing

Animadoc
UK
1938
5 minutes
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Alberto Cavalcanti, GPO Film Unit
Jacques Ibert
Jonah Jones, Fred Gamage
This film manifested Norman McLaren’s experimental and unique work for the GPO. He mixes surrealist backdrops with silhouettes of famous buildings and a story drawn on the film whose individual frames keep melting into each other in the foreground. The narrative is easily understood, but the different levels make the film appear very complex so that watching it once is hardly enough. The British Post Minister of the time was suspicious of the subliminal erotic message of the film, which meant that it was rarely screened.

---Annegret Richter

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Film Unlimited
Rainbow Dance

This is one of the most colourful GPO propaganda films. Director Len Lye painted it directly on a film strip on which a real live person had been recorded to make the figure look like an animated character dancing in a ...

UK

UK
1936

Rainbow Dance

Animadoc
UK
1936
4 minutes
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Basil Wright, Alberto Cavalcanti, GPO Film Unit
Rico’s Creole Band
Jonah Jones
Len Lye
Len Lye
This is one of the most colourful GPO propaganda films. Director Len Lye painted it directly on a film strip on which a real live person had been recorded to make the figure look like an animated character dancing in a colourful cosmos. He uses the abstract patterns familiar from his earlier works as background design, supplemented by other graphics. Music again determines the rhythm of the film, which ultimately was nothing more than a commercial for opening an account with the Post Office.

---Annegret Richter

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Film Unlimited
Sixpenny Telegram

Nine words for sixpence – the (now almost forgotten) telegram as a new way of transmitting messages quickly, cheaply and simply has entered the stage and calls for promotion ...

UK

UK
1935

Sixpenny Telegram

Animadoc
UK
1935
6 minutes
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
GPO Film Unit
Nine words for sixpence – the (now almost forgotten) telegram as a new way of transmitting messages quickly, cheaply and simply has entered the stage and calls for promotion. The film, which was probably a collective effort and produced with the simplest of means, is an experimental feast of forms which, starting from the documentary image, uses models, stop-motion animation or experimental optical effects, all testifying to the young GPO directors’ spirit of playfulness.

---Grit Lemke

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Film Unlimited
The Coming of the Dial

Set to an excerpt of László Moholy-Nagy’s “Lightplay: Black White Gray”, created by his “Light Display Machine” (the rights to which Grierson had acquired), the voice-over soberly praises science as the creative power of the modern world and proclaims the application of its laws to everyday problems ...

UK

UK
1933

The Coming of the Dial

Animadoc
UK
1933
15 minutes
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
John Grierson, GPO Film Unit
Gerald Gibbs
Set to an excerpt of László Moholy-Nagy’s “Lightplay: Black White Gray”, created by his “Light Display Machine” (the rights to which Grierson had acquired), the voice-over soberly praises science as the creative power of the modern world and proclaims the application of its laws to everyday problems. The movement of the light machine fades into that of a dial, which is predicted to revolutionise telecommunications and make direct connections across the globe possible. The fascination with which the film explains these complex technical processes is palpable. The camera literally crawls into the machine, follows endless cables and tangles of numbers and wires which become abstract textures, while dissolves give them a specific, animation film-like visual quality. Though the mystery behind the call is solved, the film is the opposite of disenchanting.

---Grit Lemke

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.