Film Archive

Countries (Film Archive)

Doc Alliance Selection 2012
The Anabasis of May and Fusako Shigenobu, Masao Adachi, and 27 Years without Images Eric Baudelaire

A leader of the extreme left Japanese Red Army, who spent the past 30 years in hiding in Beirut, her daughter, and a highly convoluted journey home between yesterday and today.

The Anabasis of May and Fusako Shigenobu, Masao Adachi, and 27 Years without Images

Documentary Film
France
2011
66 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Eric Baudelaire
Eric Baudelaire
Eric Baudelaire
Eric Baudelaire
Eric Baudelaire
Diego Eiguchi
Who are May and Fusako Shigenobu? Fusako –leader of a small extreme left-wing group, the Japanese Red Army– has been hiding in Beirut for nigh on 30 years. May, her daughter, only discovered Japan at the age of 27. And Masao Adachi? A screenwriter and radical, activist filmmaker, committed to the armed struggle. Amongst other things, he is also the instigator of a ‘theory of landscape’ – fukeiron: through filming landscapes Adachi seeks to reveal the patterns of oppression. Anabasis? This, ever since Xenophon, has been the name given to difficult or even circuitous homeward journeys. It is this complex, dark story, always full of tension that Eric Baudelaire has chosen to evoke using the documentary format. Shot in Super 8, and in the manner of fukeiron, contemporary views of Tokyo and Beirut are blended in with archive footage, TV clips and excerpts from films to spread out the backdrop for May and Adachi’s voices and memories. They speak of everyday life, of being a little girl in hiding, of exile, politics and cinema and the fascinating relationships between them.
– Jean-Pierre Rehm (FID Marseille 2011)

The Will

Documentary Film
Denmark
2011
87 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Julie E.B. Pedersen, Sarita Christensen, Copenhagen Bombay
Christian Sønderby Jepsen
Jonas Colstrup
Christian Sønderby Jepsen
Rasmus Stensgaard Madsen
Peter Schultz
Henrik’s ass is in a tight corner. His girlfriend has split, drug and alcohol abuse have gotten the
upper hand, and he’s deeply in debt. When everything is most dire and his woes seem wholly insurmountable, a door to new life is
opened when Henrik’s wealthy grandfather dies, leaving behind him a huge fortune. But at the
promise of money, family war breaks out, and years of failure and betrayal are revealed.
Sometimes reality surpasses even the most incredible cock-and-bull stories. And Christian Sønderby Jepsen's tragicomic and warm film about three brothers who inherit a fortune from their grandfather is certainly stranger than fiction. Even in Hollywood, nobody would believe the story… A film which proves that blood is thicker than water, and that true happiness cannot be bought with money.

Lina Dinkla



Doc Alliance Award 2012

Doc Alliance Selection 2012
Work Hard - Play Hard Carmen Losmann

Brave new working world: human capital delivering task-oriented performances at non-territorial work spaces or being x-rayed at assessment centres. Reports from a reality as cold as ice.

Work Hard - Play Hard

Documentary Film
Germany
2011
90 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Erik Winker, HUPE Film- und Fernsehproduktion
Carmen Losmann
Henk Drees
Dirk Lütter
Henk Drees
Carmen Losmann
Work: people who are no more than human capital behind shining panels where no personal coffee cup (please go to the Coffee Point for this) is left (the non-territorial workplace). Futuristic buildings in which nothing is meant to look like work and where human resources deliver task-oriented performances at meeting points, after having been informed by the management of their daily key performance indicators, adjusted to their skill set and the team code. “I agree with you completely”, says the manager trained in product stewardship commitment and discipline to the employee whose core data and talent assessment – evaluated in an assessment centre where he was screened and x-rayed down to his central cortex – are stored as charts in the company’s intranet.
It may sound like a dark science fiction vision, but it’s social reality. Carmen Losman competently illustrates a rather abstract subject with precisely chosen camera positions, in settings that look as cool and contrived as the world they describe, with a soundtrack where the permanent management speak is rarely interrupted by Industrial Electronic Sounds or occasionally turned off. You leave this film frozen to the core. But if joy had been the subject, the film would not have gotten more than a measly three on the management assessment scale.
– Grit Lemke (DOK Leipzig Catalogue 2011)