Film Archive

Countries (Film Archive)

Best of MDR 2014
Biblioteka – Von Büchern, einsamen Frauen und einem Leser Ana Tsimintia

They gossip, scream, hammer away on a piano, eat, drink, and bang doors. And there are more librarians than readers in this small Georgian library.

Biblioteka – Von Büchern, einsamen Frauen und einem Leser

Documentary Film
Georgia,
Lithuania
2014
54 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Mikheil Svanidze, Bernardas Andriushis, Ana Tsimintia
Ana Tsimintia
Nika Pasuri
Ana Tsimintia
Ana Tsimintia, Bernardas Andriushis
Ana Tsimintia
Sigitas Motoras
Dr. Claudia Schreiner
There must be more fulfilling jobs than being a librarian in the municipal library of Zugdidi in Georgia. Actually, from what “Biblioteka” shows one would not even assume that these women are working and that their workplace is a library. The number of employees seems to exceed the number of visitors by far. They chat, gossip and scream, someone is hammering away on a piano, people are eating and drinking in the reading rooms, doors are banged – high drama in an institute that ought to be filled with silence and concentration. All these unusual and agitated goings-on cover up the real state of the library. But the short breaks in the racket or the views of the frequently decrepit rooms with their crumbling plaster and bare concrete floors reveal that this place is an anachronism, a remnant of another system, another age. Its only remaining function may be as a meeting point for the librarians, who wouldn’t be more than remnants themselves without this place.
Best of MDR 2014
Night Will Fall – Hitchcocks Lehrfilm für die Deutschen André Singer

In 1945, the Allies filmed shocking images during the liberation of the first concentration camp; Alfred Hitchcock and others produced a film that was lost for years and was now re-discovered and reconstructed.

Night Will Fall – Hitchcocks Lehrfilm für die Deutschen

Documentary Film
Israel,
UK,
USA
2014
76 minutes
subtitles: 
VO_German

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Sally Angel, Brett Ratner
André Singer
Nicholas Singer
Richard Blanshard
Arik Lahav, Stephen Miller
Lynette Singer
Aviv Aldema, Amir Boverman
Dr. Katja Wildermuth (MDR), Barbara Biemann (NDR)
When the first concentration camps were liberated in 1945, the Allied cameramen’s assignment was to document the events systematically – a record of the inconceivable. The images they produced were so grim and horrifying that much of what we have seen in this context probably pales in comparison. On the basis of this material, renowned filmmakers like Sidney Bernstein, Alfred Hitchcock, Billy Wilder and Stewart McAllister produced a documentary with the revelatory subtitle “No German can say he didn’t know”.
The political agenda of German reconstruction prevented its publication – reels vanished or ended up in archives, where they lay untouched for decades. Now the Imperial War Museum has managed to reconstruct the film almost completely. Supplemented by testimonies of contemporary witnesses, “Night Will Fall” is a haunting reflection of the story of this documentary film and one of the darkest chapters of the 20th century.
Best of MDR 2014
Pfarrer Chris Wright, Stefan Kolbe

A preachers’ seminar in the city of Luther, Wittenberg: observations and interviews with budding pastors and a matter-of-fact look at religious feelings and life plans.

Pfarrer

Documentary Film
Germany
2014
90 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Heino Deckert
Chris Wright, Stefan Kolbe
Tobias Hume, Andrea Falconiero, Johann Sebastian Bach, This Will Destroy You, Pinoreks
Stefan Kolbe
Chris Wright
Chris Wright, Stefan Kolbe
Chris Wright
Susanne Sturm, Martin Hübner
A large group of young people in liturgical robes look at the audience, wave their arms and chant “Aaah, hoooo!” Their entranced faces as they sing and pray could be irritating, just like their fairly unusual career aspirations: these people want to become pastors. In remarkable contrast to such irritations and certainly suitable to qualify some prejudices, the aspiring ministers seem anything but entranced. The seminar they attend seems almost like a therapy group. They want to take up this profession because they believe in God, but surely also because their biographies are the way they are. They talk more openly about their lives than many would have expected – especially considering that the filmmakers call themselves atheists and don’t hesitate to ask critical questions. This creates a striking look at religiousness, concepts of humanity and life plans – and somehow even a consensus between the different perspectives in front of and behind the lens.