Film Archive

Countries (Film Archive)

International Programme 2015
A Baptism of Fire Jérôme Clément-Wilz

The lives of young war reporters who travel to crisis spots at their own expense and risk their lives to shoot the picture that will change everything. A precarious job.

A Baptism of Fire

Documentary Film
France
2015
58 minutes
subtitles: 
English
French

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Jérôme Caza – 2P2L
Jérôme Clément-Wilz
Jérôme Clément-Wilz
Ael Dallier Vega
Jérôme Clément-Wilz
Nowadays countless journalists and photographers are travelling the world to supply us with the latest news and images from conflict regions. Stories of heroic war reporters were often told in the cinema. Jérôme Clément-Wilz takes a different perspective: news journalism is an industry, too. Many freelance photographers, most of them young, travel to hotspots at their own expense – hoping to shoot the life-changing picture at the right place at the right time and sell it for a high price to the leading media or agencies. The film is an intimate observation of the lives of young French reporters that gives them the space to reflect on their work. Their dreams come true in the Arab Spring: their pictures make it to the cover pages of the biggest dailies. And yet Clément-Wilz avoids heroic pathos, concentrating instead on his young protagonists’ spirit of adventure and youthful recklessness on the one hand and on the tough business where there are no safety nets and where the ones who risk their lives most readily have the best chances of survival on the other. War reporter – a precarious job.

Zaza Rusadze
Healthy Workplaces Film Award 2015
Automatic Fitness Alejandra Tomei, Alberto Couceiro

Life on an exacting conveyor belt. This detailed puppet animation that sparkles with ideas is a scathing satire on our brave new working world that thinks the term “human resources” through to the end and invents a new running technique in the process.

Automatic Fitness

Animated Film
Germany
2015
21 minutes
subtitles: 
_without dialogue / subtitles

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Alejandra Tomei
Alejandra Tomei, Alberto Couceiro
Boris Joens, Ole Wulfers
Alejandra Tomei
Dietmar Kraus
Alberto Couceiro
Alejandra Tomei, Alberto Couceiro
Dietrich Körner
Imagine waking up in the morning in your bed, which stands on an assembly line. An automatic wake-up call and a few pills handed to you by robots make you fit for the working day. And so on and so forth at a predetermined speed. Life on an exacting conveyor belt. This detailed puppet animation that sparkles with ideas is a scathing satire on our brave new working world that thinks the term “human resources” through to the end and invents a new running technique in the process.

Lars Meyer



Healthy Worklplaces Film Award 2015

Next Masters Wettbewerb 2015
Brumaire Joseph Gordillo

The last French coal miners in charismatic photos. The present day holds only precarious jobs for the young generation. The end of work in suggestive images.

Brumaire

Documentary Film
France
2015
66 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Juan Gordillo, Martine Vidalenc
Joseph Gordillo
Hervé Birolini
Laetitia Giroux
Dominique Petitjean
Cynthia Gonzalez
Sandrine Mercier, Christian Lamalle
When the last French coal mine in Lorraine was closed in 2004, Joseph Gordillo had already gone down many times with the miners to photograph them and capture his own fascination for this underground world in the pictures. He portrays the mine as a living cosmos the workers are part of. Even in individual portraits they stay a part of the whole. Their charisma is visible in their shining eyes, their strength in the group.

In his film Gordillo reworks the photographic material, reconstructing the age of mining through pans, processed images and abstract sound collages. A former miner lends his voice – a vivid field report and flow of thoughts.

But Gordillo’s theme is not work in the past but its social significance. And so he adds a second voice, that of a young woman, a miner’s daughter. She can still be proud of her father but no longer of herself. Her life as a cleaning woman in a town marked by decline is captured in its sterility and lack of perspective. The step away from the solidarity and identity of the miners leads directly into isolation. With noticeable consequences: de-politisation, unemployment, a shift to the right. In suggestive images, the film portrays the autumn of the work society over two generations.

Lars Meyer

Factory Complex

Documentary Film
South Korea
2015
95 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Min-kyung Kim
Heung-soon Im
Tae-won Lee
Sun-young Lee, Heung-soon Im, Gil-ja Kim, Yun-jeong Jee
Hak-min Lee
Min-kyung Kim
New hypes regularly make teenagers all over the world queue up for new sneakers. They have no idea that the women who make them can’t afford them. “I want to wear Nike shoes, too”, was the slogan when they started their struggle in the 1980s. The video artist Im Heung-soon, whose mother worked in a textile factory, makes them visible: an army of worker ants who built the foundations of South Korea’s meteoric rise to economic power and who paid for this with their health and often their lives. Im Heung-soon draws a connection to today’s globalised consumer worlds where it’s the women again who keep things going in textile factories, the electronics industry, super markets, call centres or the service industry, who earn a pittance and always wear a friendly smile. He interweaves this ruthless and sober chronicle of exploitation, told in interviews, with surrealist experimental performances which individualise the pain of those who are usually seen as a mass or as human capital first and foremost.

Im Heung-soon won the Silver Lion at the Venice Biennial for his moving work which oscillates between art and documentation. It would be even better to spare a thought for the women from “Factory Complex” before the next mobile phone is purchased. And to question the purchase in the first place.

Grit Lemke
International Programme 2015
Since the World Was World Günter Schwaiger

Slaughtering, ploughing, harvesting grapes and searching for illegal marihuana plants in the cornfield. Being a farmer in Castile: doggedly traditional in the crisis – a warm-hearted observation.

Since the World Was World

Documentary Film
Austria,
Spain
2015
103 minutes
subtitles: 
German

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Günter Schwaiger, Cristina G. Alía
Günter Schwaiger
Bence Boka, Los Linces
Günter Schwaiger
Günter Schwaiger, Martin Eller
Günter Schwaiger
Cristina García Alía
Gonzalo is a farmer of the old school who lives with his family in Castile. To be called an agronomist would probably be an insult to someone like him. His way of managing things is in many ways the opposite of the all-devouring economisation of all areas of life. But he only chose this existence as a resistance fighter half-freely – the other half was forced upon him. First of all by a tradition that’s effectively in his bones. Then by a deep rootedness in the soil that nourishes him. And finally by a sturdy philosophy that makes him say such simple and clear things like: “When everyone was throwing money out of the window and lighting fires with banknotes, our kind was considered outdated and backward. Now that most people have lost everything the others are no better off than us, and we are more or less the same.”

Empathetic “Schadenfreude” und a surrealist sense of humour are essential parts of Gonzalo’s rustic world. Günter Schwaiger’s affectionate long-term observation of this world could also be seen as cinematic medication to strengthen our immune system against the temptations of consumerism and agricultural capitalism – defences our mind urgently needs.

Ralph Eue
Healthy Workplaces Film Award 2015
Tagelöhner Syndrom Rita Bakacs

Rita Bakacs had to rise early to film her protagonists (all of them male): the vacancies hatch at the Neukölln Job Centre opens at four in the morning. Latecomers could come away empty-handed.

Tagelöhner Syndrom

Documentary Film
Germany
2015
30 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Damian Schipporeit, Rita Bakacs
Rita Bakacs
Rasmus Sievers
Rita Bakacs
Rita Bakacs
Vensan Mazmanyan
Rita Bakacs had to rise early to film her protagonists (all of them male): the vacancies hatch at the Neukölln Job Centre opens at four in the morning. Latecomers could come away empty-handed. Waiting, smoking, drinking coffee. If you’re lucky and own a pair of hard toed boots you may get one of the coveted day jobs – hard work for little money.

In a few precisely observed and edited scenes Bakacs depicts the dead end of precarious work.

Grit Lemke



Healthy Workplaces Film Award 2015

Wie die anderen

Documentary Film
Austria
2015
86 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Johannes Rosenberger
Constantin Wulff
Johannes Hammel
Dieter Pichler
Constantin Wulff
Claus Benischke, Andreas Hamza, Klaus Kellermann
Once psychiatric institutions were regarded as the marginal zones of civilisation where the “deranged” people were excluded (or locked away) from the community of the “healthy”. Today this is considered an untenable stereotype, at least in theory. However, there is a lack of images suitable for internalising such assumptions in practice and permanently. Constantin Wulff, a dedicated representative of Direct Cinema, and his cinematographer Johannes Hammel spent one and a half years at the child and adolescent psychiatry of the hospital of Tulln in Lower Austria, observing the human and institutional processes set in motion when children and adolescents suddenly get off track. How does anyone end up in such an institution? How does one become a “case”? Even if such a “case” can only be worked out in any meaningful way when people look beyond the process and re-focus on the human being.

With admirable confidence Wulff balances his film between rash chumminess and cheap distance – always trying to do justice to the very complex interactions playing out in before his lens. Also at the focus: institutional work as a permanent balancing act between gentleness and pressure, routine and emotional involvement, regulations and improvisations.

Ralph Eue