Film Archive

Late Harvest 2018
#Female Pleasure Barbara Miller

Misogyny is structurally inscribed in the cultural cores of all social systems in the world. “#Female Pleasure” exposes these cores, lucidly and from a global perspective.

#Female Pleasure

Documentary Film
Germany,
Switzerland
2018
97 minutes
subtitles: 
German

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Philip Delaquis, Arek Gielnik
Barbara Miller
Peter Scherer
Anne Misselwitz, Gabriela Betschart, Akiba Jiro
Isabel Meier
Barbara Miller
Tom Weber
Women are subordinate to men. They are born sinful and have no legal claim to their own body. Misogyny is more than a phenomenon observed across continental divides all over the world and in some cases the cause of abuse and crime. It is structurally inscribed – literally – into the core of all social systems founded on religious beliefs. In the bible, for example, we read: “I find woman more bitter than Death […] The man who is pleasing to God eludes her.”

In this lucid film, which takes a global perspective, five female protagonists talk about misogynistic behaviour they experienced, hostilities they were exposed to, crimes committed against them. Rokudenashiko, a Japanese artist, is on trial for the obscenity of her art. Deborah Feldman escaped with her son from a Hassidic community in Brooklyn, leaving her husband to whom she was forcibly married. Leyla Hussein, Doris Wagner and Vithika Yadav talk about rape and mutilation, lack of legal protection, homophobia, shame and the strange feeling that one’s sexuality and body are associated with sin from birth.

Lukas Stern



Awarded with the Special Prize of the Interreligious Jury

Aquarela

Documentary Film
Denmark,
Germany,
UK
2018
90 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Aimara Reques, Heino Deckert, Sigrid Dyekjær
Victor Kossakovsky
Eicca Toppinen
Victor Kossakovsky, Ben Bernhard
Victor Kossakovsky, Molly Malene Stensgaard, Ainara Vera
Victor Kossakovsky, Aimara Reques
Alexander Dudarev
A film about water. Beauty, power and threat are mingled in Victor Kossakovsky’s latest work: the peace of the ice on Lake Baikal is treacherous. Under the surface it’s bubbling, melting – much earlier than usual. So a group of rescue workers is kept busy, pulling car after car from the frozen masses and recovering the drivers.

Icebergs are sinking in the sea here, storms drive torrents of rain aground in Florida, whole oceans are crashing down the Salto Ángel in Venezuela. 40 years after his debut as a filmmaker, 30 years after he graduated from the Higher Courses of Film Writers and Directors in Moscow and about seven years after his documentary “Vivan Las Antipodas!”, which measured the globe in geographical opposites, Victor Kossakovsky has produced another film that makes the landscapes of the world its protagonists. “Aquarela” shows bodies of water all over the world, in all their manifestations, in all their changing aggregate states caused by comparatively tiny differences in temperature. The camera maps on boats, dives under the surfaces, rises in the air to capture the expanse of space. Kossakovsky composes a visual symphony of primeval powers set to Heavy Metal music. The powerful images provoke awe, wonder flows from the screen like sea spray.

Fabian Tietke

Putin’s Witnesses

Documentary Film
Czech Republic,
Latvia,
Switzerland
2018
107 minutes
subtitles: 
English

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Natalya Manskaya, Gabriela Bussmann, Vít Klusák, Filip Remunda
Vitaly Mansky
Kārlis Auzāns
Gunta Ikere
Vitaly Mansky
Anrijs Krenbergs
“The state is like a garden,” says Putin’s old form teacher’s husband, “you have to destroy the weed so that something worthwhile grows.” “We’ll do just that,” the lifetime president-to-be answers almost shyly and leaves his teacher’s flat, which he visited to shoot an advertising clip directed by Vitaly Mansky who, as the country’s leading documentary filmmaker, was allowed to follow and record the campaign. After 18 years of concrete rule by the little man with the strong hands, the long-emigrated director looks back at the fateful year of 2000 and reviews his footage. What he discovers is breathtaking and has the emotionalising power of an almost intimate home video. The Mansky family already dread the new Mao while Yeltsin’s clan is jubilant at first and ex-Tsar Boris even sees his successor Vladimir as the guarantee of real media freedom –later he disgustedly calls the pivotal turn-back “krasnenko” (reddish). Putin himself talks about reasons of state and an autocratic life which he intends to avoid at all costs. Finally, the question whether it was right to reanimate the old Soviet hymn with quasi new lyrics becomes a bone of contention in the duel Putin vs. Mansky. The sad conclusion is that nobody was just a “witness”. Everybody played a part in the many compromises made in hopes of a “better life.”

Barbara Wurm

Touch Me Not

Documentary Film
Bulgaria,
Czech Republic,
France,
Germany,
Romania
2018
123 minutes
subtitles: 
German

Credits DOK Leipzig Logo

Bianca Oana, Philippe Avril, Adina Pintilie
Adina Pintilie
Ivo Paunov
George Chiper-Lillemark
Adina Pintilie
Adina Pintilie
Veselin Zografov, Dominik Dolejší, Marek Poledna
The Einstürzende Neubauten are playing “Mela-Mela-Melancholia”, questioning the state of the nation. Between the somnambulistic scenes played out in the border area between documentary and fiction, deep-seated intimacies that concern us all are addressed. The project – the winner of this year’s Golden Bear – is experimental: many of the protagonists are “real”, play themselves; others, like Laura Benson and her fellow actor Tómas Lemarquis, pick up on scripted sketches but let their roles come so close that they penetrate their own lives. They talk about and perform sex, about inhibitions and visions, fears and ways to overcome them. Their goal, the goal of this unusual film: (self) liberation.

The director enters the frame occasionally, sits on the couch with Christian Bayerlein, the “kissability” blogger, or with the transsexual Hanna Hofmann, letting us know that she is taking part, looking at things but resisting voyeurism as the camera floats above a group BDSM session or follows a touch therapy workshop, some of whose participants are physically severely disabled, at close range. She speaks, too, about her own boundaries of shame, far removed from the “Likes”-obsessed narcissistic Social Media egos. A transgressive critique of norms, aesthetically and politically correct (which is a good thing). And extremely bold into the bargain.

Barbara Wurm