Film Archive

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Something Better to Come (Yula's Dream)

Documentary Film
Denmark,
Poland
2014
60 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Hanna Polak, Sigrid Dyekjaer
Hanna Polak
Keaton Henson, Kristian Eidnes Andersen
Hanna Polak
Marcin Kot Bastkowski, Hanna Polak
Hanna Polak
Kristian Eidnes Andersen

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Mama arbeitet im Westen – Eine Kindheit in Polen

Documentary Film
Germany,
Norway,
Poland
2014
58 minutes
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Anita Rehoff Larsen, Tone Grøttjord
Åse Svenheim Drivenes
Eirik Myhr
Michał Jarosiński, Jacek Gruszka
Åse Svenheim Drivenes
Håkon Lammetun, Petter Fagerlund, Bartosz Idzi
Katja Wildermuth
Kuba is 13 years old, his brother Mikołaj is seven. Kuba wakes his brother up, asks him to eat breakfast, the boy refuses. They go out to together to buy some crisps and walk home hand in hand. At night they sit at home and play computer games. There’s something missing in this daily routine: where are the adults?
Kuba’s and Mikołaj’s parents are not in the same country as their sons. Their father works in Scotland, their mother in Austria, while the sons are waiting in Poland for one of them to come home. At school Kuba is not allowed to tell that the two boys are alone, and the construction seems indeed to be tottering only when Kuba reaches his limits and behaves conspicuously.
The film is a disconcerting demonstration of how responsibilities have shifted with the labour markets and how economic problems can lead to passive violence against the weakest members of our society.

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Special Screening MDR
Nur der Pole bringt die Kohle Markus Stein

Poles are the new Germans – conquering villages and real estate markets in the abandoned eastern German border regions. A whimsical sociological study of the new Europe.

Nur der Pole bringt die Kohle

Documentary Film
Germany
2014
89 minutes
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Olaf Jacobs
Markus Stein
Eike Hosenfeld, Moritz Denis, Tim Stanzel
Miriam Tröscher, Bernadette Paassen, Rasmus Sievers
Anna-Maria Hora
Andreas Kannengießer, Gianpiero Tari
Silke Heinz
The border between Poland and Germany fell in 2004. At first the Poles feared that their rich neighbours would buy up their land and property. Ten years later things look different: a new movement has started in the almost abandoned villages of the provincial East German border regions that turns all familiar stereotypes of the binational relationship upside down. The drop in real estate prices made a region that until recently attracted attention only because it was depopulated, as the young people, who had no perspective, moved away, attractive to Polish families from the wider Szczecin area. One after the other they move “across”. They earn enough money to afford houses here and at the same time live near their workplaces.
The Poles are conquering the lonely expanse of their West. The only working mobile phone network is Polish, the real estate companies are firmly under Polish control, there’s an association that helps them deal with the German authorities and the local building society is advertising German child benefits. The new arrivals learn German and send their children to the European School. A whimsical sociological study about cheap real estate, typical Poles, typical Germans, the other and the new Europe.

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Special Screening MDR
Ein Hauch von Freiheit – Schwarze GIs, Deutschland und die US-Bürgerrechtsbewegung Dag Freyer

Black GIs experience a kind of equality in post-War Germany – and carry the idea back to the States. Veterans about an irony of history.

Ein Hauch von Freiheit – Schwarze GIs, Deutschland und die US-Bürgerrechtsbewegung

Documentary Film
Germany,
USA
2013
90 minutes
subtitles: 
No
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Leopold Hoesch, Sebastian Dehnhardt, BROADVIEW TV
Dag Freyer
Benjamin Wistorf
André Hammesfahr, Philipp Kiesling
Dag Freyer
Ulrich Brochhagen (MDR), Charles Poe (Smithsonian Networks)
They came to Germany to free the country from racism and oppression. But their own army and country were ruled by strict segregation. This documentary by Dag Freyer tells the story of the African-American soldiers stationed in post-World War Two Germany. Accepted by the German population as representatives of one of the victorious powers, it was the first time they experienced a kind of equality. They were allowed to enter the same places as white people, relationships with white women – unthinkable at home – were the order of the day.
The shock after their return from the war was all the bigger. Once back in the States, the black US military personnel found they were facing the same conditions as before the war: segregation and discrimination determined their lives. In Germany the soldiers had seen the opposite and this experience of freedom was to give a massive boost to the civil rights movement. An irony of history: one of the foundation stones for the victory over segregation in the United States was laid in the ruins of Nazi Germany, of all places.
In “A Touch of Freedom”, World War Two veterans remember their time in Germany and their political work at home. Among them is former US Secretary of State Colin Powell, talking about his deployment in Gelnhausen in one of his most personal interviews.

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

No Place on Earth

Documentary Film
USA
2012
80 minutes
subtitles: 
No
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
J. Flint Davis
Janet Tobias
John Piscitello
César Charlone, Edu Grau, Peter Simonite, Sean Kirby
Deirdre Slevin, Claus Wehlisch, Alexander Berner
Janet Tobias, Paul Laikin
Lewis Goldstein
Hubert von Spreti (BR), Katja Wildermuth (MDR)
This multiple award-winning documentary by Emmy Award winner Janet Tobias, acclaimed at a host of international festivals, tells another incredible story of living and surviving in times of persecution and war.
In 1993, New York speleologist Chris Nicola makes a discovery. While exploring a subterranean system in the Ukraine he comes across some highly unusual objects: a woman’s shoe, a house key, a hand-hewn millstone … It takes him nine years to fit all the parts of this mysterious story that happened 60 years back even then together.
In May 1942, as the Nazis advance further and further into Eastern Europe, five Jewish families flee into one of the biggest cave systems in the world: 124 kilometres long with five lakes. 38 Jews –from infant to old man – are now hiding in the darkness. They make themselves at home, build beds, and lamps from old bottles. Some of them frequently risk their lives leaving the cave to get firewood and food from the world above. For almost two years, the cave-dwellers live, work, eat, and sleep right beneath their enemies’ feet. When the Nazis retreat in April 1944, all 38 Jews come out of their cave: mud-encrusted, in ragged clothes, and blinded by the sunlight – but alive.

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Gerhard Richter Painting

Documentary Film
Germany
2011
98 minutes
subtitles: 
No
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Thomas Kufus (Zero One Film) Koproduktion: Sabine Rollberg (WDR/arte) (fed), Jutta Krug (WDR), Katja Wildermuth (MDR), Terz Film
J.S. Bach, Dietmar Bonnen, John Cage, György Kurtag
Johann Feindt, Frank Kranstedt, Dieter Stürmer
From the first sequence this film takes us right into Gerhard Richter’s well-protected Cologne studio. The filmmaker Corinna Belz observed the media-shy artist at work over the summer of 2009, in the bright rooms where he paints, regards, evaluates, thinks, waits, discards, re-works, sometimes destroys and begins again.
In extremely condensed scenes Richter shares a very personal and highly charged creative process with us, from the first layer of paint via countless re-workings and repaintings to the last, decisive stage when the painting must stand on its own and stand up to the artist’s critical eye. We are drawn into the process by Richter’s dry comments which reveal not just hard-won wisdom about life and art but also a laconic sense of humour, a deep humanity and the ability to question himself as much as the events before and behind the camera.
He still has his fundamental scepticism of all ideologies and religious systems. “I want to know what’s going on,” was a reason for painting he once gave. Richter’s aim is to find ever new perspectives, examine the image of the world which in the end shines through in every single painting. “Painting is another form of thinking”, Richter said early in his career. This film takes his premise seriously.

Production note

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Special Screening MDR
Propaganda, Hass, Mord - Die Geschichte des rechten Terrors in Europa Rainer Fromm, Rolf-Axel Kriszun

A documentary about the organisations, structures and strategies of European right-wing terrorism over the past 40 years.

Propaganda, Hass, Mord - Die Geschichte des rechten Terrors in Europa

Documentary Film
Germany
2012
60 minutes
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Frank Seidel Redaktion: Ulrich Brochhagen (MDR), in Zusammenarbeit mit arte
Rainer Fromm, Rolf-Axel Kriszun
Nikolai Tamás, Jean-Marie Gilles
Christoph Karsch
Rainer Fromm, Rolf-Axel Kriszun
This documentary reconstructs the history of right-wing terrorism in Europe, which started over 40 years ago.
Italian neo-fascists were the first to execute murderous attacks in order to prevent a political shift to the left and enforce the return to an authoritarian regime in the young Republic. Old and new Nazis in the Federal Republic of Germany studied the methods of left-wing terrorism to profit from them. The RAF’s spectacular acts of violence drew all public attention to themselves, a circumstance exploited by right-wing terrorists to target the young democracy almost unnoticed. In France and Belgium, too, neo-Nazis organised themselves and formed combat organisations against parliamentary democracy. Their paramilitary groups were in close contact with their counterparts in the Federal Republic and Italy.
When a number of neo-Nazi organisations were banned in Germany in the mid-1990s, the extreme right responded with a new strategy. They disbanded fixed structures and formed loose comradeships which would allow them to act spontaneously and avoid prosecution. Since the main focus of the security authorities’ attention currently is on Islamist terrorism, there is a great danger that right-wing terrorists will be able to massively upgrade their arsenals and refine their conspiratorial underground structures.

Production note

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.