Film Archive

Sections (Film Archive)

German Competition
Coming off the Real Time, for a While Anna Friedrich

On the Swedish coast, the farmer Sven Axel lives with his mother, a few animals and a lot of imagination. He dreams of filmmaking and acting. Now he tries out both.

Coming off the Real Time, for a While

Documentary Film
Germany
2019
62 minutes
subtitles: 
English
German
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Anna Friedrich, Ray Peter Maletzki (ROSENPICTURES)
Anna Friedrich
Stef Ketteringham
Anna Friedrich
Anna Friedrich
Anna Friedrich
Andrea Rüthel, André Görbing, Leo Rocker, Maximilian Glaß, Anna Friedrich
Anna Friedrich follows Sven Axel Nilsson into the morning fog. Sven Axel works as a farmer somewhere in Sweden, the sea nearby. But he is much more than that. Friedrich teases it out of him by asking him about his dreams and fears, by wanting to know which of the four elements is his favourite. She hands him the camera because he wants to film stones, so a short but no less spectacular contribution about a mystical rock formation becomes part of this unconventional portrait. But Sven Axel also likes acting and so, without further ado, he becomes this, too: an actor.

Far away from almost any disturbance, the two begin a kind of game in which both Sven Axel’s mother and an area used by the Swedish army for exercises play roles. “For me the world is a quite big globe. ’Cause I haven’t travelled so much in my life,” he says. And adds: “Now, the wide, wide world seems very small. But it’s not true. If you sail, or you’re walking or you ride, it’s quite a big world, it is.” In any case, Sven Axel’s world is an extremely rich one. Anna Friedrich makes it negotiable.

Carolin Weidner

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

German Competition
Girls of Paadhai Natalia Preston

In a women’s refuge in Southern India, girls are faced with the decision between education and early marriage. But how much freedom of choice is allowed by tradition?

Girls of Paadhai

Documentary Film
Germany
2019
90 minutes
subtitles: 
English
German
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Natalia Preston
Natalia Preston
Stephan Garin
Isabelle Casez
Andreas Zitzmann
Natalia Preston
Andreas Fertig
A woman’s refuge in southern India serves as a shelter for children and adolescents who resist early marriage. The girls discuss love – with surprisingly pragmatic considerations: “If your parents get you married to a boy, you can confront them, can’t you? But if you pick the boy, they can say: It was your choice.” Spoken by twenty-year-old Amulpriya, whose case demonstrates the underlying structures. Her mother, too, was married at an early age to a man who turned out to be unable to provide for her, as had been hoped. After a lifetime of work and deprivation, she now wants the same solution, which didn’t work for her, for her daughter: marriage. But Amulpriya wants to get an education and is supported by Sunitha, the manager of the shelter.

The name Paadhai refers to the specific building and the shelter it houses, but also to the charity organisation that supports it. Natalia Preston picks up a few other stories beside Amulpriya’s and thus reveals why gender relations are so dominant in Indian society: They are the crucial social question that runs through all sections, even the often-invoked caste system.

Bert Rebhandl



Awarded with the Film Prize Leipziger Ring.

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

German Competition
Halb Traum Dandan Liu

A reunion, ten years after graduating from the Beijing Academy of Fine Arts: How much is left of the creativity of that time? What does everyday life look like today?

Halb Traum

Documentary Film
Germany
2019
86 minutes
subtitles: 
English
German
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
KHM Kunsthochschule für Medien Köln
Dandan Liu
Dandan Liu, Mayc Eccher, Fang Du, Shi Tou
Dandan Liu
Fang Du, Xingguo Liu
Dandan Liu
Dandan Liu
Ten years ago they graduated together from the Beijing Academy of Fine Arts and dreamt of creative careers: in photography, graphic design, in video and installation art, in film or mixed media. The filmmaker, who subsequently left China, continued her studies in Germany and lives here today. She sets out in search of her former fellow students. What do they still have in common? How do they see their past works today? How did the urge to make art change? What is left of their dreams? What does their everyday life look like today?

In addition to asking fundamental questions about changes in creativity and inspiration, the film is also a portrait of the one-child policy generation of the 1980s, whose lives were shaped by massive economic and social upheavals and who tried to resist through their individual concepts of life. How much scope for personal (artistic) development is left – in their everyday life, from which art is gradually fading? Because the university did not teach them how to survive economically on art alone.

Frederik Lang

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

German Competition
Havelland Fontane Bernhard Sallmann

When Fontane’s text and Sallmann’s images enter into a dialogue, the result is gradually turned into an event movie. Literature meets visualisation meets an old contemporary landscape.

Havelland Fontane

Documentary Film
Germany
2019
109 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Bernhard Sallmann
Bernhard Sallmann
Bernhard Sallmann
Christoph Krüger
Bernhard Sallmann
Klaus Barm
At first it seems a spoken word film whose greatness comes only from the famous text that celebrates the unspectacular, long neglected hinterland of Berlin as if it was as impressive as the awe-inspiring Alps or the lovely Lake Constance. But it is precisely the simplicity and precision of Theodor Fontane’s observations that feed the style of “Havelland Fontane”, Bernhard Sallmann’s continuation of his explorations of “Ramblings through Brandenburg”.

It consists of factual observations of the landscape today which do not directly illustrate the text, as a simple travel report would do – a description of Werder island here, the images to illustrate it there. By rejecting these attributions, Sallmann arouses interest. Which place is meant and why is he filming children in the water? The viewer enters the anecdotal and entertaining details of the text, while the time gap between the words (1889) and images (2018) becomes more and more tangible. One hears about the history of the Slavs which shapes the region until today and thinks about tendentious historiography. In the longest chapter, one learns a lot about the isolated fishermen’s island of Werder and its curiously secretive inhabitants. It is said that the islanders were even spared the plague and founded a fruit empire that has lasted through the ages.

Saskia Walker

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

German Competition
Im Stillen Laut Therese Koppe

Erika and Tina, both 81, take a humorous look back at their lives in the GDR. At the time they fought for freedom, autonomy and their love – to the indignation of the prudish Stasi.

Im Stillen Laut

Documentary Film
Germany
2019
72 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Therese Koppe, Marie-Luise Wagner, Filmuniversität Babelsberg KONRAD WOLF
Therese Koppe
Irma Heinig
Annegret Sachse
Evelyn Rack
Therese Koppe
Billie Mind
Erika and Tine are 81 and have been a couple for 40 years. The two women live on a farm in Brandenburg they restored themselves and look back on eventful lives. In the GDR they both had to fight for personal and artistic freedom and struggled daily with socialism, not to mention its actually existing contradictions. Unlike other GDR creative artists who cracked under the rejection of their art and ideas, they both take a humorous look back today at the manifold documents of their lives, contextualising and contradicting the numerous Stasi files with their own memories, photos, paintings, sculptures and texts. They use the conversations with the young director to take a close look at their own (GDR) past, but also the post-reunification period, the present and future.

What can art do in times of social political challenge? How can one stay true to oneself, art and one’s ideals? Where are women still confronted by structural discrimination today? How can social grievances be resolved together? By staying naturally close to its protagonists, the film manages to achieve an enchantingly lucid narrative about freedom, autonomy, creativity and sociality – and, last but not least, a marvellous ode to love.

Luc-Carolin Ziemann



Honorable Mention of the VER.DI Prize for Solidarity, Humanity and Fairness.

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

German Competition
Landretter Gesa Hollerbach

A mayoress, an astronomer, a restaurateur and a female farmer active in the European Parliament. They are all united in this mellow portrait – as well as in the fight for their respective homes.

Landretter

Documentary Film
Germany
2019
83 minutes
subtitles: 
German
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Erik Winker, Martin Roelly, Alexander Dumreicher-Ivanceanu, Bady Minck
Gesa Hollerbach
Johannes Winkler
Jennifer Günther
Carina Mergens
Gesa Hollerbach
Johannes Winkler

Life in the country has many facets and faces. Nature, peace, tradition. But reality today is often different, because structural change is destroying Europe’s villages. Schools are forced to close, communities are underfinanced, land speculation makes the farmers’ work harder and glaringly illuminated cities make the stars harder to see than a few years ago even in the hinterland. Locked-up cinemas, dilapidated houses, deserted train stations. Gesa Hollerbach’s unagitated documentary portrays four people and their lives. They come from very different backgrounds: a mayoress, an astronomer, a restaurateur, and a female farmer active in the European Parliament. In Saxony, in the Allgäu, in Austria. Ultimately, though, they are united in a joint, relentless struggle for their respective homes. The film wants to show that change can be imagined and implemented, that resistance bears its first fruits and that the tireless efforts of those courageous guardians of the countryside are not in vain. Today we see young families in the streets again and couples who deliberately choose to move to the country. The change has already begun.



Julia Weigl


The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

German Competition
Nachspiel Christoph Hübner, Gabriele Voss

Final part of a long-term observation of football talents trained at Borussia Dortmund in the 1990s. Three lives with, for and after the “favourite sport”.

Nachspiel

Documentary Film
Germany
2019
94 minutes
subtitles: 
German
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Erik Winker, Martin Roelly
Christoph Hübner, Gabriele Voss
Jörg Follert
Christoph Hübner
Gabriele Voss
Christoph Hübner, Gabriele Voss
Gabriele Voss

A new hip at 34! The life of a football player can be tough. And what comes next? Christoph Hübner and Gabriele Voss meet three men again whom they have followed since 1998 as part of a long term observation of football talents. “Nachspiel” forms a trilogy with “The Champions” (2003) and “HalfTime” (2010). Florian Kringe, Heiko Hesse and Mohammed Abdulai were all once regarded as the great hopes of the professional team of Borussia Dortmund. But their careers took very different turns. Kringe had the greatest potential but was set back by many injuries. Hesse soon played only to finance his studies in England and works in Brussels today. Abdulai has a German passport, works as a bus driver and is planning a trip to his native Ghana. They saw sport as a “school of life”. “Nachspiel” also references these three life stories with the rapid developments in contemporary football, where talents are promoted and challenged by high tech.



Bert Rebhandl


The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Resonance

Documentary Film
Germany,
Israel
2019
56 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Itay Marom
Itay Marom
Itay Marom
Sunjha Kim, Itay Marom
Rotem Dror
Music can trigger the deepest and most secret emotions in us, be a physical, mental or spiritual experience – for the musicians who create it, too. Aspiring singers take private lessons to reach the highest level of classical singing. The film follows three renowned voice and singing teachers and their students over the course of a semester. It is tough physical training, hours of practice, breathing, finding the exactly right positions of tongue and jaws. Because ultimately the magic of extreme emotionality can be produced only on the basis of technical perfection, by pouring ones personality into it, by an interplay of effort and the ability to let go.

Though we learn little about the singers, listening primarily to their voices, we feel the intensity and intimacy that arises between teacher and student in these kinds of private lessons – an atmosphere in which something great, transcendent is being built. The light and usually quiet concrete building of one of the three music academies visited by Itay Marom for his film seems almost like a Zen monastery.

Frederik Lang



Awarded with the DEFA Sponsoring Prize.

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

German Competition
Waterproof Daniela König

Two women, two worlds, one occupation: Khawla and Aishe are plumbers in Jordan. Will they be able to make their friendship waterproof again after the whirlwind of events?

Waterproof

Documentary Film
Germany
2019
88 minutes
subtitles: 
English
German
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Stefan Kloos, Michaela Pňačeková
Daniela König
Basel Naouri
Patrick Richter
Alex Bakri
Daniela König
Manja Ebert, Claudia Leder
At the beginning the car radio plays a song you simply have to hum along with. The song escapes the neat compact car, floats out into urban space and becomes the initial sound of an in some respects initial film. In the car, women on their way to the next job are sitting, giggling, singing (and smoking). They are plumbers – a golden craft that shines a little brighter than elsewhere here in the desert state of Jordan. Water needs to be carefully protected from leaking, getting dirty, dripping and seeping away here. This lends their mission a heroic touch – and provides the not unfunny horizon in front of which the German media artist and reportage filmmaker Daniela König talks about something (almost) completely different.

This other thing is not encountered often in the (Western) filmic view of “the Arab world”. It’s bright and casts shadows only where two diverging developments meet in a confined space. Here is peroxide-blonde Khawla, who successfully sells herself in the media as “Jordan’s first female plumber”, and there is her employee Aishe, who wants to start something new as her 40th birthday is approaching. How will their friendship develop in the up and down of hierarchic friction, in the shifts from patronising to dependency to patronising? This is shown in a documentary that borrows its plot from soap operas – and pays back in the currency of another genre.

Sylvia Görke

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

German Competition
Zustand und Gelände Ute Adamczewski

Ute Adamczewski films places in Saxony that are no longer recognisable as sites of Nazi persecution in 1933. A charged confrontation of contemporary scenes with archive texts.

Zustand und Gelände

Documentary Film
Germany
2019
119 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Ute Adamczewski
Ute Adamczewski
Stefan Neuberger
Ute Adamczewski
Ute Adamczewski, André Siegers
Ludwig Berger
The title already indicates that this is about two levels. History and the present, archive and presence – these are the terms Ute Adamczewski uses to describe the tension between state and terrain. The series of dichotomies could be continued with “image and sound”. What we see in these two hours are towns, places and landscapes in Saxony. They all have a connection to events immediately after the Nazis seized power in 1933. At that time the hunt for political opponents began which affected so many that numerous, partly improvised prisons and camps were built in the area.

An off-screen woman’s voice calmly reads from documents of the period, supplemented and expanded by memoirs of those affected from the post-war period. Historical-political aspects are added successively. In the GDR, only those who had fought against fascism were regarded as “victims of fascism”. Jews were no victims in that sense. This finds a remarkable parallel in the fact that even the Nazis in their attempts to bring order to the persecutions of 1933 (still) excluded the Jews: “Foreign descent is no reason for protective detention.” An impressive film about the presence of the past, both in form and content.

Bert Rebhandl



Awarded with a Golden Dove in the German Competition Long Documentary and Animated Film and the VER.DI Prize for Solidarity, Humanity and Fairness.

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Der Esel hieß Geronimo

Documentary Film
Germany,
Switzerland
2018
80 minutes
subtitles: 
English
German
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Arjun Talwar (Lo-Fi Films)
Arjun Talwar, Bigna Tomschin
Arjun Talwar
Bigna Tomschin
Arjun Talwar, Bigna Tomschin
Franek Kosłowski
“An island always has two sides. One is summer, the other is winter,” a man called Rüdiger says. A fact that makes life on the island more difficult, because farming and surviving are much harder in winter. Other obstacles of living together: the famous “island rage” which is probably found all over the world in every latitude and longitude.

The residents of Store Okseø in the Baltic Sea managed to withstand all this adversity for more than ten years. Then they quarrelled and left the island, almost all of them with a broken heart. Nobody got over this place and what happened there. The island is a subject of conversation, a niggling gap, a throbbing wound. There seems to have been a donkey called Geronimo there, but also countless varieties of roses, coffee and beer for all visitors, music, events, a shared dream. A fixed point in the ocean. Without it, the sailors would have lost their ground, a friend believes. And it’s true, they are all lying at anchor in their small boats now, rocking, drinking, scolding and spying on each other, and thinking.

Carolin Weidner


Nominated for the Goethe-Institut Documentary Film Prize

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

German Competition
Der Funktionär Andreas Goldstein

A “Film about the Father”, the GDR functionary Klaus Gysi. And a film about a state often associated with injustice. Not here: the good communist is a tragic figure.

Der Funktionär

Documentary Film
Germany
2018
72 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Andreas Goldstein, Heino Deckert
Andreas Goldstein
Jakobine Motz
Chris Wright
Andreas Goldstein
The “Film about the Father” is a difficult genre. Andreas Goldstein, son of the GDR cultural functionary Klaus Gysi (1912–1999) has tackled this task with a complete lack of vanity, but with insistence: measured and calm, honest and intellectual, analytical and personal. He uncovers a mosaic that renounces both the teleologies of the self-styled winners of history and the simplifications of (West) German Oscar nominees. This film is not about the lives of others, but about his own life. Not about yesterday, about today, too.

The focus is on the father and his lifelong ambition to found a social order in which “spirit and power are in complete agreement”. It’s on the primal scene of the Jewish intellectual (the sight of a dead worker), the career of an SED Party communist (head of a publishing house, cultural minister, ambassador, state secretary for church matters), insights into a driven private life. Part of this “communist genealogy” himself, Goldstein comments own photos, found television material and images from Berlin (then, today) from offscreen, setting a high standard for a re-evaluation of the state that will always be his origin: “We would reject questions about the legitimacy of our present existence. How come we ask them about the past all the time?”

Barbara Wurm

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

German Competition
Der Stein zum Leben Katinka Zeuner

Finding the stone that will do justice to the deceased’s personality, that’s what’s important for Michael Spengler and those who come to him. The process results in the individual “Grabzeichen”.

Der Stein zum Leben

Documentary Film
Germany
2018
77 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Katinka Zeuner
Katinka Zeuner
Katinka Zeuner
Anna Pesavento
Oliver Eberhard, Birte Gerstenkorn, Martin Nevoigt, Joel Vogel
“Well, people are usually quite complex,” says Michael Spengler. He is the man people turn to when they want a tombstone that’s different. One that will reflect the deceased’s personality, the life that has passed. In her film Katinka Zeuner records three deaths and the ensuing process of finding the right stone: a young couple who have lost their child, a woman with two sons who try to form an idea of their father’s respectively grandfather’s life with Spengler, and a woman looking for the right shape for a man called “Cliewe.” Spengler becomes a kind of medium who takes in his customers’ memories and emotions to translate them into material form. The process is collaborative; the parties meet frequently over weeks and months to create something that Michael Spengler calls a “tomb sign.”

Carolin Weidner


Awarded with the ver.di Prize for solidarity, humanity and fairness
Honorable Mention Goethe-Institut Documentary Film Prize

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

German Competition
Der zweite Anschlag Mala Reinhardt

A precise study of the correlations between radical right wing attacks in Germany and the insufficient political and social ostracism of racism and violence.

Der zweite Anschlag

Documentary Film
Germany
2018
62 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Kate Blamire, Benjamin Cölle, Katharina Degen, Patrick Lohse, Mala Reinhardt
Mala Reinhardt
Macarena Solervicens
Patrick Lohse, Katharina Degen
Federico Neri
Kate Blamire, Gerald Mandl
As a child Ibrahim Arslan survived the arson attack on his parents’ home in Mölln in which three members of his family were killed. Today he says that his family suffered not just one, but two attacks. After the Molotov cocktails had burnt out, the Arslan family became a target of attacks again, this time coming from the media, politics and society. These attacks were worse than the incendiary devices because they could have been avoided, Arslan says.

In her film, Mala Reinhardt asks why even today many victims of radical right-wing violence are forced to live through the same experience of being treated with hostility and criminalised. The victims, who have formed a network, analyse with impressive clarity which conditions make racism still socially acceptable in our country. The essential thing now is to listen to them.

Luc-Carolin Ziemann


Honorable Mention ver.di Prize for solidarity, humanity and fairness
Nominated for the Film Prize Leipziger Ring and the Young Eyes Film Award

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

German Competition
Die Sinfonie der Ungewissheit Claudia Lehmann

As clever as it is soulful. Anyone who has seen this symphonic essay and still claims that physics and documentary film have nothing in common must have blocked off their hearts, minds and all senses.

Die Sinfonie der Ungewissheit

Documentary Film
Germany
2018
95 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Andrea Schütte, Dirk Decker (Tamtam Film), Claudia Lehmann, Konrad Hempel (Institut für experimentelle Angelegenheiten IXA)
Claudia Lehmann
Konrad Hempel
Eike Zuleeg
Marianne von Deutsch, Claudia Lehmann
Claudia Lehmann, Konrad Hempel
Corinna Zink
This is a far-reaching interrogation of something that’s usually regarded as the undoubted precondition of life (generally) and filmmaking (specifically): an objective, at best yet interpretable reality.

Starting with Gerhard Mack, retired professor of theoretical elementary particle physics at the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) in Hamburg, Claudia Lehmann and Konrad Hempel set out on a filmic expedition that aims for the universal and at the same time delves into the molecular (and smaller) realm, asking for the meaning of every kind of life in our complex world. Mack is a recognised master of his field and anything but a blinkered nerd. In incredibly personal conversations with the hypnosis therapist Rosemarie Dypka and the filmmaker Hark Bohm, who act the double part of common sense, the physicist acts as the gifted translator of his own theories. And then, of course – last but not least – there is the score, composed by Konrad Hempel, which it would be a simplification to call industrial music. It’s the second, pulsating ventricle of this documentary essay. Generated from the DESY soundscapes, which means auditory field research, the music enters the stage step by step to become a co-actor of equal weight, structuring the film as a symphonic piece of work.

Ralph Eue


Nominated for the Goethe-Institut Documentary Film Prize

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

German Competition
In Search … Beryl Magoko

A young woman in search of her femininity, which was taken from her by genital mutilation when she was a child. A courageous and multi-layered film narrated from the first person perspective.

In Search …

Documentary Film
Germany
2018
90 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Beryl Magoko
Beryl Magoko
Jule Katinka Cramer
Fani Schoinopoulou
Beryl Magoko
Malin Schmid, Johannes von Barsewisch
As a child in Kenya, the filmmaker Beryl Magoko was subjected to a life-threatening ritual which many girls undergo even today. At the time, “female circumcision” – a friendly, barely adequate term for the genital mutilation she endured with horrible pain – seemed to her like something that was an integral part of growing up. Today she knows that it doesn’t have to be that way. Knowledge alone doesn’t help her, so she meets other victims who, like her, waver between anger and shame and still suffer from the procedure decades later.

With her personal and highly political film, Beryl Magoko sets out on a journey that leads her both into the past and the future. Strikingly frank, but without anger, she confronts her own family with questions and reproaches. At the same time she is facing the decision whether to undergo reconstructive surgery and begin a new chapter in her life.

Luc-Carolin Ziemann


Awarded with the Film Prize Leipziger Ring

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.