Film Archive

Sections (Film Archive)

Anger

Documentary Film
Spain
2014
24 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Sergi Casamitjana
Mireia Fontanals
Jordi París
Anna Serra
Eli Sort
Mireia Fontanals
Aleix Burgueño
Anita and Amadeu are still a couple, though age is definitely getting to them. They can’t escape their different habits, accomplishing everything with infinite slowness. Their only companions nowadays are the cats and the dog. She is still quick on her feet and keeps things going, while Amadeu just about manages, with effort and patience, to keep upright. Being dependent on each other, their tone gets sharper.
The whole drama of ageing is precisely sketched in a few scenes. The young filmmaker Mireia Fontanals keeps visiting the two over an extended period of time to document the same processes. Quite simple, in principle, because there are only a few locations left in the life of the couple: their home, the hospital ward, the nursing home. And there are only a few questions left open. This one for example: do you still love me?
Cornelia Klauß

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Escort

Documentary Film
Netherlands
2013
19 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Zinzy Nimako, Jonne Roos
Guido Hendrikx
Lucas Malec
Emo Weemhoff
Lot Rossmark
Guido Hendrikx
Tijn Hazen, Taco Drijfhout
How do you lift someone lying shackled on the floor? How do you carry him or her when they resist? How do you fasten a body? How do you push it up a gangway? What do you do when they scream? And how do you manage to deport a desperate person, who may be leaving a family behind, to a country where nothing but insecurity, poverty or persecution awaits them? These are the questions that young recruits of the Dutch federal police must face as they are completing a special training course in escorting rejected asylum seekers on their deportation flights.
Guido Hendrikx gives us, comprised in a few scenes, a tightly composed Direct Cinema insight into a practice that is common but mostly invisible to the public. While he avoids outright emotionalisation, he manages to disturb us nonetheless. Because we can’t evade this question either: what is humane? (and asking ourselves with some trepidation what we would do if an “escort” and his passenger were sitting behind us on a plane).

Grit Lemke



Golden Dove in the International Short Documentary Competition 2014

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Hotel 22

Documentary Film
USA
2014
8 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Elizabeth Lo
Elizabeth Lo
Jonathan Zalben
Elizabeth Lo
Elizabeth Lo
Elizabeth Lo
Christopher Giamo
The end of the line, Palo Alto, California. Bus No. 22 ceaselessly drives passengers through wealthy Silicone Valley. An ordinary urban bus during the day, it leads an unglamorous double life at night. When darkness falls, the poor, the homeless, figures in the shadow of wealth, gather at the bus stop. Silently and cumbrously they climb the bus which turns into a rolling dormitory. For one night they are jarred to the bones, exposed to arguments and racism and showered with instructions for order that suggest that everything here is still fine and in control: “If you’re tired, put your head up against the window.” In a little less than eight minutes the film captures the mood swings of this ride through the night which has become part of their daily life for many, and at the same time draws a sketch for a large-scale portrait of society.
Lars Meyer

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Metaphor or Sadness Inside Out

Documentary Film
Portugal,
UK
2013
32 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Catarina Vasconcelos
Catarina Vasconcelos
Lucie Troger
Catarina Vasconcelos
Catarina Vasconcelos
Catarina Vasconcelos
Mike Wyeld
A young man from Lisbon writes to his sister, a filmmaker living in London. He confesses that, nine years after their mother died, he feels an emptiness in his life. Her answer is a film intended to fill that gap. The brother describes his nostalgia for a time when he wasn’t even born yet, a past that seems lost. It is their mother’s past, the time of the Portuguese revolution, which reconciled a country that was internally fractured. Today, that feeling of freedom is hard to grasp for a post-revolutionary generation living through the euro crisis. Can you film yourself backwards in time?
The grainy Super 8 material bridges the gap between the present and the past. The camera visits the places of three generations of a family that have felt halved. The sea, which the grandfather once called a metaphor for the world, is one of them. The lyrical dialogue between brother and sister keeps returning to that feeling of halfness, while the visual level is a search for the missing half, not without a subtle irony that offsets the melancholy undertone. After all, a metaphor will be a metaphor. A self-reflexive, poetic picture puzzle in which the personal always transcends itself.
Lars Meyer

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Of God and Dogs

Documentary Film
Syria
2013
11 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Abounaddara Collective
Abounaddara Collective
Abounaddara Collective
Abounaddara Collective
The face and voice of a young Syrian fighter. The left half of his face is in deep shadow. We hear a story, still glowing with the remembrance of an interrogation at which he was consulted as a specialist. His words and sentences are delivered haltingly, gravely. The first sentence, after he has collected himself smoking, head bowed and eyes closed: “I killed.” He is convinced that the man he shot at the end of the interrogation was innocent. But the ten men who were present at the interrogation had already pre-condemned the suspect, just wanted their judgement legitimised. What should have been an ordinary assignment became within a few long minutes a test of the young man’s humanity, which he feels he has failed. This is the failure that “Of God and Dogs” examines as it swells to a great filmic requiem: unreconciled, masterful, despairing.
Ralph Eue

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Presence

Documentary Film
Iran
2013
18 minutes
subtitles: 
_without dialogue / subtitles
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Hossein Rasti
Hossein Rasti
Hossein Rasti
Hossein Rasti
Mosoud Asadi
Men flagellating themselves until blood flows, ecstatic moaning and masses of people overwhelmed by grief … Every year on the Day of Ashura, Shia Islam commemorates the death of the third Imam in the battle of Kerbela. The martial images of this procession shape our ideas of a religion whose history and present day are marked by repression and suffering.
Hossein Rasti, too, opens with this ritual but in a surprising twist turns to look at its secular side. There’s cooking and eating going on here. In a multi-purpose hall hastily converted into a sacred place, a host of cooks feed 5,000 believers with a traditional lamb stew. Rasti cuts from the mourners’ tears to those of the man who has to chop a mountain of onions. Hectolitres of soup are being prepared in huge, bubbling pots (if hell should exist, this is how it must look), ladled out at lightning speed and skilfully slapped in front of the rows of seated believers. Their orderly withdrawal is managed with the same routine.
Blood, meat, and bread – archaic symbols, which a skilful montage strips of their religious aura without damaging it. This powerful (and brave) miniature shows that a community of faith can also be defined in earthly terms.
Grit Lemke

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Starting Point

Documentary Film
Poland
2014
25 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Ewa Jastrzebska
Michał Szcześniak
Przemysław Niczyporuk
Jacek Tarasiuk, Daniel Gąsiorowski
Katarzyna Bonda, Michał Szcześniak
You grow with your tasks, they say. Aneta’s task is immense and painful. She has to confront her past every day if she wants to have a future again. When she was 19 she rebelled against everything and ended up as a murderer. Nine years later, she is allowed to leave prison occasionally to do community service in a nursing home. This is where she meets an old lady, Helena – in whom she finds a life story that ran completely counter to hers. While Aneta risked her chances and freedom, Helena grew up a rheumatic and knows the world, as she says, only through the window. Still she calls herself a realist.
Accepting the circumstances – a sense of reality, as it were – becomes the key to Aneta’s anxious hopes for forgiveness and a new beginning outside her monotonous prison life. In finely apportioned doses the film reveals the stations of her life and inner struggle, mirrored in Helena’s sincere interest. The dialogue between the composed little woman in the wheelchair, who almost disappears under her hat, and her caretaker with her emotional swings reveals more than mere sympathy – it may even be mutual fascination.
Lars Meyer

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

T's World: The Over-identification of Terry Thompson

Animadoc
France,
UK,
USA
2014
29 minutes
subtitles: 
No
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Ramon Bloomberg
Ramon Bloomberg
Ramon Bloomberg
Stark Haze
József Szimon, Balázs Őrley
On 18th October, 2011, the sheriff of Zanesville, Ohio, got an agitated phone call: the animals that eccentric Terry Thompson was legally keeping on his ranch were roaming the county. Red alert! That night, a heavily armed police force killed more than 56 bears, tigers, wolves, leopards and lions. Thompson had opened the cages, shot himself and offered his body as food to the animals. So far, so good, so American.
British media artist Ramon Bloomberg has turned this bizarre incident into a Brechtian story. Bloomberg combines Brecht’s play “The Yes Sayer” about traditional custom and formalised law with the American settler’s anarchical logic of freedom which fights every kind of state influence as an infringement on individual freedom: I am the lord of my animals, my land, my house, my family. End of story!
Bloomberg translates epic theatre into the language of film in the age of Play Station games. Real live shots are combined with images from the police car’s video camera, Google Earth data mining sequences and computer animated re-enactments. We hear minutes and statements of everyone involved as well as a comment taking the form of an (antique) chorus, the voice of the law, the neighbour and the animal. The only voice we don’t hear is Terry Thompson’s. His motives remain a big secret.

Matthias Heeder



Honorary Mention in the International Competition Animated Film 2014

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

The Predicate and the Poppy

Animadoc
France
2013
24 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Valérianne Boué, Luc Camili
Jeanne Paturle, Cécile Rousset
Thomas Dappelo
Mélanie Braux
Jeanne Paturle, Cécile Rousset
Jeanne Paturle, Cécile Rousset
Manuel Vidal
When knights parade up and down, unknown flying objects whirl through the air and the room suddenly turns into an impenetrable maze, we are in the classroom of an ordinary school on the outskirts of Paris. That’s roughly how five young teachers experience their first days on the job. And since words can hardly express what’s going on at a school, Jeanne Paturle and Cécile Rousset resort to a rich arsenal of animation techniques to translate this mixture of desperation, anarchy and chaos into images. Photo collages, cut out animation, plasticine and classic cartoon animation make historic personalities rise from the history books, reconstruct the Big Bang and make numbers begin to dance. The film literally explodes! But it aims at more and, above all, refuses to lament the dreadful state of education. Only when the teachers themselves become students, understanding the alphabet of the street and the key to every single student, can the nightmare of school perhaps turn into a space of freedom.
Cornelia Klauß

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Victory Day

Documentary Film
Russia
2013
29 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Sergey Vinokurov, Alina Rudnitskaya
Alina Rudnitskaya
Fedor Bakulin
Alina Rudnitskaya
Sergey Vinokurov
Alexsey Antonov
“Only in Russia is it possible for the president to declare the year in which he files for divorce the ‘Year of the Family’.” While the sea of flags of the victory parade in the streets of St. Petersburg below illustrates how much Russian nationalist, communist and orthodox positions have merged in this country of ideological extremes, lesbian and gay couples stay at home on their sofas. Behind closed windows and out of reach of the new public who are to be kept pure of all “perverts”. They talk about how they met and how their parents and environment deal with their coming out. A talk show is being broadcast on television, an upright citizen thinks that the anti homosexual law passed in June 2013 is too harmless: “This type should be forbidden to donate blood or sperm and if they have a car crash their hearts should be buried in the ground or burned as unsuited for the prolongation of any kind of life.” The applause lasts several minutes.
The nice thing about this film is the normality of these loves and lovers, the obviousness of their views and attitudes. And yet – certainly at the end, in the brilliant final montage – a layer of desperation has settled on their intelligent faces. After the Jews and queers, one of them says, all that’s missing is a law against witches. Welcome to the Middle Ages, welcome to Russia today.
Barbara Wurm

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

White Death

Documentary Film
Chile
2014
17 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Isabel Orellana Guarello
Roberto Collío
Roberto Collío
Matías Illanes
Roberto Collío
Jota Sandoval, Roberto González
Roberto Collío
Roberto Collío
The vivisection of a landscape: sombre black and white images unfurl panoramas of a scraggy mountain region. Narrow paths winding through the Andes, crosses decorating the wayside. The ruins of a barracks appear, once housing recruits who departed on a last exercise and were caught in a snow storm. Fragments of real live shots collide with extremely reduced animations. The film’s emulsion begins to pulse and dissolve. Sudden lightning destroys every trace of narrative. This is not the reconstruction of an event that happened in 2005, but the evocation of a nightmare of coldness and death that was irrevocably inscribed into the landscape.
Director Roberto Collío deftly and brilliantly experiments with different materials to evoke graphical analogies. He started out as a sound designer; so on the subtly wrought soundtrack the lonely death of a young soldier finds its long, sad echo in the diminishing sounds of a whistle.

Cornelia Klauß



Golden Dove Animated Documentary 2014

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Alppikatu 25 – Home to the Homeless

Documentary Film
Finland
2012
27 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Cilla Werning, Liisa Juntunen
Inka Achté, Marika Väisänen
Graham Hadfield
Sari Aaltonen, Daniel Lindholm, Tuomas Järvelä
Hannele Majaniemi
Alppikatu Street No. 25 has been the address of a shelter for the homeless in Helsinki since 1937. A place for men who have no place of their own. Men without a past? “Create your own memories”, says the motto on a piece of paper pinned to the wall. And yet the memories and traces of the lives of many people who have made a minimal home here, if only temporary, are stored in the monotonous architecture, whose long, bare corridors and narrow cells make one think of a prison. Five of them tell their stories. For a moment, the film delves into each of their interior worlds using only their voices, to which subtle sound collages are added. Visually, the men are never more than phantoms. Sometimes they are caught in the blurriness of the room, sometimes they seem near stagnation. Only the cigarette smoke appears to move. The room, on the other hand, offers no resistance to the exploring camera, as if it could really tell us something about its inhabitants. The abstract brushes shoulders with the concrete, time brushes the room.

Lars Meyer

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Distance

Documentary Film
India
2013
38 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Ekta Mittal
Ekta Mittal, Yashaswini B. Raghunandan
Rahul Giri
Paromita Dhar, Amith Surendran
Abhro Banerjee
Ekta Mittal, Yashaswini B. Raghunandan
Abhro Banerjee, Christopher Burchell
Bangalore City, the realm of migrant workers. A realm that can be found right behind the station or on the other side of the railway, where the big scaffolds are, among which you see squat corrugated iron huts one might (and probably has to) call provisional, where people have built a few makeshift square metres to live in. When life itself has become a construction site, dreams fly away. Love is mainly a memory or desire, in other words, the past or the future. In the world of today it’s mostly a gap. So stories of love become all the more important. Told or heard directly or absorbed from Bollywood via tiny mobile phone screens and speakers, these stories also supply adaptable patterns in whose intricate plots the boys on the construction sites can easily imagine themselves as actors.
Yashaswini Raghunandan and Ekta Mittal show the same sure instinct and brilliant cinematic intuition they did in their first film as they follow the fleeting auras of people and places – last year, their film “Presence” was also screened in the Leipzig competition. And they once more un-fold (in the true sense of the word) realities that would otherwise remain inaccessible to us.

Ralph Eue



Golden Dove in the International Short Documentary Competition 2013

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Emergency Calls

Documentary Film
Finland
2013
15 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Hannes Vartiainen, Pekka Veikkolainen
Hannes Vartiainen, Pekka Veikkolainen
Joonatan Portaankorva
Hannes Vartiainen, Pekka Veikkolainen
Hannes Vartiainen, Pekka Veikkolainen
Hannes Vartiainen, Pekka Veikkolainen
Hannes Vartiainen, Pekka Veikkolainen
Joonatan Portaankorva
What is your emergency? The question that’s at the start of every call to an emergency centre is also at the start of this film. Excited, sometimes desperate people on the soundtrack. The emergencies: precipitate labour, a multiple car crash. But also a killing spree and the last radio message of the “Estonia”. The call marks the boundary between life and death which – perhaps – will be crossed. It also depends on those who take it: embodied here by white figures lacking any status-generating symbols such as clothing or hair. Reduced to the naked, pure human being everything depends on. Or are they the Erinyes who hold our fate in their hands?
There is no blood, no images of disasters. We see NASA footage of earth as seen from space instead, clouds, lightshows, radar signals, pointedly distorted. What is one man’s need in view of the infinity of the universe? – Everything, claims this film which, like all works by the directing duo Vartiainen/Veikkolainen, defies categorisation. It reminds us of the conjunctive which runs through our secure lives in the shape of the potential for the worst case. The writing on the wall that silently hovers above us. Would have. Could have. What is your emergency?

Grit Lemke

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Everyday Everyday

Documentary Film
Syria
2013
26 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Maia Malas, Madalina Rosca
Reem Karssli
Reem Karssli
Reem Karssli
Reem Karssli
Impressions of a flat, only a few things are captured. A drive on the backseat of a car. One can only suspect that there is an outside. A shadow on the carpet that belongs to another flat. This place is safer. There is a balcony over whose balustrade one had better not look. The woman behind the camera is glimpsed in the reflections on the windowpane. Shots ring out frequently. They say a kiosk was bombed. No, two. They say the Free Syrian Army is building a barrier in front of the house one had to leave behind along with one’s past, dreams and hope. The fear grows “every day”. Everybody knew that Syria was free, would stay free and never accepted any dictatorship, the TV set announces.
In her video diary Reem Karssli paints the sensitive portrait of a family whose members must cope with reality in very individual ways “every day”, a reality “even harsher, uglier” than what the camera is able to capture. A rare document, powerful in its extreme immediacy, which only a miracle could have brought out of this flat.

Claudia Lehmann

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Mom

Documentary Film
Russia
2013
28 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Lidiya Sheynina
Lidiya Sheynina
Lidiya Sheynina
Lidiya Sheynina
Lidiya Sheynina
Lidiya Sheynina
Lidiya Sheynina points her calm and distant camera at her mother’s body and face, often angled from below. Over the years, the mother has evolved the physiognomy of a turtle plodding along comfortably. Life is hard, the flat is cramped, but she makes the best of it – on and on. She has taken care of her aged mother for decades, the grey-haired, graceful Grande dame of this student film treasure, who sometimes exercises (jumping jack in a wheelchair), sometimes calls old friends (if they haven’t died yet), sometimes does the dishes (even the Teflon frying pans she’s not supposed to) but usually only sits and eats, or drinks from a beautiful old cup that has “babushka” written on it. The grandmother, who has forgotten how old she is (“What? 96? Impossible.”), that she has had no husband for the past 17 years (“Really?”) and hasn’t left the flat in 20 years (“That’s precisely why I’d like to go out again.”), has turned into a child, the daughter into a mama. The radio talks of the wonderful independence of old age; life is different. Together every day and every night. And yet Mama happily sways back and forth to the morning music and looks out of the window with her mother. Waiting for spring. Such tender metaphors turn “Mama”, a film of small gestures, into great cinema.

Barbara Wurm



Honorary Mention in the International Short Documentary Competition 2013

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.