Film Archive

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Am I a Wolf?

Animated Film
2018
8 minutes
subtitles: 
_without dialogue / subtitles
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
KANOON – Institute for the Intellectual Development of Children & Young Adults
Amir Houshang Moein
Mohamad Jafari
Amir Houshang Moein
Amir Houshang Moein
Amir Houshang Moein
Hosein Ghourchian
Children perform a puppet theatre version of the fairytale of “The Wolf and the Seven Young Goats”. They identify so strongly with their roles that the boundaries between acting and real life begin to blur. In restrained colours, the drawn animation shifts between these levels. For the boy who plays the big bad wolf the performance ends in an emotional borderline experience. This film is based on a collection of poetry by the Iranian children’s and youth book writer Afsaneh Shaban-nejad.

Annina Wettstein



Awarded with a Golden Dove in the International Competition Short Animated Film.

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Asho

Documentary Film
2019
30 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Maryam Najafi
Jafar Najafi
Amir Shahabi
Ahmad Babadi
Huda Arshad Riahi
Saeid Bahrami
Asho knows not only how to deal with goats, he also knows about films. He tries to see at least one a day. His favourite director is Tim Burton. Always on the road (Asho means “eagle”), the Iranian shepherd’s son dreams of being an actor. By his side: his cousin and future wife Pari. Pari thinks that if Asho becomes a star, then so should she. But they both have been for a long time: This is their behind-the-scenes.

Carolin Weidner



Awarded with an Honorable Mention in the International Competition Short Animated and Documentary Film.

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

International Programme
Exodus Bahman Kiarostami

Every day, thousands of Afghans want to leave their Iranian exile. In the return centre in Tehran, the longing for home meets the Iranian bureaucracy. Human, complex, eye-opening.

Exodus

Documentary Film
2019
77 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Bahman Kiarostami
Bahman Kiarostami
Davood Maleki
Bahman Kiarostami
Every day, thousands flock to the “Imam Reza” return centre in Tehran to apply for their exit permit to Afghanistan. The drastic fall of the Rial exchange rate, triggered by the US sanctions against Iran, has made living in exile uneconomic for the more than three million Afghan refugees. But anyone who wants to return to their old home must squeeze through the bottleneck of the agency that is part of the Iranian interior ministry. This is where they are registered, often after years of illegality.

Bahman Kiarostami focuses on following the brief conversations of those eager to return with the Iranian civil servants, which reveal the complex causes and manifold consequences of migration. It is surprising and sometimes very moving how quickly closeness is generated in these basically bureaucratic encounters, how one question, a personal word makes them open up to the camera. “Exodus” shows that migration is a part of daily life worldwide and that this won’t change as long as war, persecution and economic hardship threaten lives. As long as there are causes for migration, people will set out. Borders and regulations may make their path (dramatically) difficult, but they won’t be able to extinguish their wish for a better life.

Luc-Carolin Ziemann

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Family Relations

Documentary Film
2019
77 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Nasser Zamiri
Nasser Zamiri
Nasser Zamiri
Nasser Zamiri, Neda Asadi
More than fifty relatives gather on a narrow terrace for a family photo. Right at the start, the director asks those who don’t want to be part of the film to go. Half of them leave the picture. Those who stay have therefore given their consent. What follows is the tragicomic retelling of an Iranian family saga in which everything revolves around the head of the family: “Haji Baba”, the father. They say he’s malicious and interfering. His children and his wife, who left him, raise serious charges, submit a complaint against him. As is so often the case, it is a matter of inheritance. Haji Baba denies everything. But who is right?

In his filmic family constellation, the filmmaker tries to keep his bearings in a jungle of conflicting statements. He does not arrange a direct confrontation between the factions, but gives every family member a stage, using surprising tools and lots of humour. He lovingly presents the outcast, who has a poem to recite or a romantic song to sing for every occasion. Secretly, Haji Baba dreams of fame, which this film will hopefully bring him.

Annina Wettstein

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

International Programme
Khatemeh Hadi Zarei, Mehdi Zarei

14-year-old Khatemeh lives in extremely restrictive structures in the Iranian city of Shiraz. She runs away to escape a forced marriage. But the case is anything but clear.

Khatemeh

Documentary Film
2018
90 minutes
subtitles: 
English
German
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Hadi Zarei, Mehdi Zarei
Hadi Zarei, Mehdi Zarei
Satar Oraki
Hadi Zarei, Mehdi Zarei
Babak Heidari
Alireza Alavian
The structures of Khatemeh’s family, who originally came from Afghanistan but have lived in the Iranian city of Shiraz for more than thirty years, are rigid. The fourteen-year-old girl was married to a man double her age. He was in a relationship with her older sister, who took her own life. He says: “When she died, I wanted to marry her sister because they look alike.” According to the men in the house, mental problems are common to all the women in the family. And now Khatemeh has run away, to a kind of women’s refuge, because she couldn’t stand it any longer. She wants a divorce. Some male relatives go to the refuge to take Khatemeh with them. Her brother says: “Death is better than being a whore.”

At first glance, the situation seems clear. In the course of the film, however, more and more discrepancies emerge. Khatemeh especially shifts unpredictably between mental states. Sometimes she curses her family and fights for her freedom, then she implores the women who run the refuge on her knees to let her go home no matter what. Other girls, who also took refuge in the home, are sometimes attacked violently by her. “Khatemeh” is like a desert storm which again and again obscures the view to reveal a new vista when it’s died down.

Carolin Weidner

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

None of Your Business

Documentary Film
2019
64 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Kaveh Farnam
Kamran Heidari
Kamran Heidari, Mansour Vahdani
Kamran Heidari
Saeideh Keshavarzi, Kamran Heidari
Ali Farmani
How he lived and died is nobody’s business, the singer Ebrahim Monsefi sings in a song documented in a video flickering with decay. It comes at the end of a film whose very existence asserts the opposite, because it narrates precisely that life, which was shaped by his love of music and a crash caused by the loss of loved ones. It started in the traditionally cosmopolitan southern Iranian seaport of Bandar Abbas at the Strait of Hormuz. There is even a (deserted) Hindu temple there, where the orphan grew up with his grandfather, surrounded by music from all over the world that was absorbed and interpreted by the locals. Thus Ebram learned to play the guitar at an early age and became a local star as a singer-songwriter, before he became addicted to heroin and died in 1997.

Today his songs are popular standards in the region. And catchy melancholy tunes which, in archive footage of Ebram himself and street sets of contemporary performers, become the vibrant framework of Kamran Heidari’s film. Added to this are restagings of individual stations of his life. And the artist as a spirit whose emerging, almost pathological obsession with femininity can also be read as a comment on the worldview of the never explicitly mentioned Islamic Revolution. Thus the film is more a parable than a biography, but also the portrait of a fascinating, vibrant city.

Silvia Hallensleben

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Kids DOK
Rainbow Children: Portrait of Elika Maryam Bayani

Little Elika explains that people in Iran like five things above all: rice, the sun, ice cream, fish and tulips. She gives a presentation about her home country in a Belgian school.

Rainbow Children: Portrait of Elika

Documentary Film
2018
12 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Maryam Bayani
Maryam Bayani
Victoire Bonin, Léo Malek
Maryam Bayani, Reza Mosadegh
Maryam Bayani
Maryam Bayani
Maryam Bayani, André Philips
Little Elika explains that people in Iran like five things above all: rice, the sun, ice cream, fish and tulips. She gives a presentation about her home country in a Belgian school, which includes a Persian poem she translates directly into French. Her audience is amazed: Elika talks differently all of a sudden. And so something strange playfully becomes familiar.

Kim Busch

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Next Masters Wettbewerb
Sentenced to Death Ahmad Jalili Jahromi

A group portrait of confident female criminals in Iran: neither charismatic bad girls nor victims of circumstances, but women with soft spots and hard edges, beyond familiar stereotypes.

Sentenced to Death

Documentary Film
2018
48 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Didar Shomali, Ahmad Jalili Jahromi
Ahmad Jalili Jahromi
Abbas Sarafraz
Sajjad Avarand, Ali Baghaei
Ahmad Jalili Jahromi
Ahmad Jalili Jahromi
Ensiyeh Maleki
A group portrait of evil women in Iran. One of them, Marjan, has been a drug dealer since childhood. She was imprisoned for gang crimes in conjunction with armed robbery and kidnapping. With other inmates, some of them convicted for murder, she founded a theatre group that was allowed to perform outside the prison, too. The work bound the women together, changed their perspectives and priorities, but did not turn them into new persons. Nor did it effect any delays in the execution of verdicts – including death sentences. During rehearsals, one of the actors, Safieh, learns that she will be executed on the next day.

Director Ahmad Jalili Jahromi meets his protagonists on equal terms, appoints himself neither lawyer nor judge, and certainly not the women’s probation officer. It’s astounding how the filmmaker manages to steer his narrative around the stereotypes of tragic victim or charismatic gangster moll and equally astounding how little effort is made in this film to court reflexive affection or compassion. Not to belittle affection and compassion, but especially in the cinema they are no more than reflexes and, as such, easily activated. “Sentenced to Death” chooses the harder path.

Ralph Eue

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Tan

Documentary Film
2018
72 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Elsa Klughertz (Jonas Films), Ali Shirkhodaei (Reyhan Film)
Elika Hedayat
9T Antiope
Ali Shirkhodaei
Maxence Voiseux
Elika Hedayat
Amaury Arboun, Vincent Pateau
Elika Hedayat distinguishes between the bodies made available to her as models at drawing school and those she encounters in her mind. The former are maimed, sometimes monstrous, they have missing limbs and painful expressions on their faces. Hedayat begins to search for the real persons behind the figures her imagination is projecting on the walls of her skull. She meets Iranian men whose bodies were maimed and thus formed by war. But also men who increase their body mass by disciplined exercise, seemingly compensating for the lack of arms and legs of the others. The young woman is fascinated by the human, male body which she regards as potentially the result and imprint of a much bigger one – the social body. “Tan” is the filmic investigation of this connection which Hedayat grasps intuitively. Together with some of the protagonists she literally dives into the depths to look for the bottom, the reasons. The others’, but also her own.

Carolin Weidner

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

International Programme
Women with Gunpowder Earrings Reza Farahmand

A dramatic insight into the embattled Syrian-Iraqi border region. The young reporter Noor sees herself as an anti ISIS fighter but learns that her worldview was too simple.

Women with Gunpowder Earrings

Documentary Film
2017
77 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Morteza Shabani
Reza Farahmand
Christoph Rezaie
Reza Farahmand
Reza Farahmand, Fatemeh Bonyadi, Mosayeb Hanaie
Reza Farahmand
Hasan Mahdavi
War reporting is a balancing act. What can you show? Who profits from your images? The young Iraqi reporter Noor Al Helli reports from the embattled Syrian-Iraqi border region. She sees herself as a civilian member of the anti ISIS troops and wants to expose the cruelties of the Islamists. When she meets a group of women and children captured as sympathizers of the Islamic State, her view of the enemy is shaken. Touched by their existential poverty and hopelessness, she puts the camera down and tries to understand what drove these people to join the Salafist terror organisation. She is forced to acknowledge that these women and children have no intention of giving up their worldview voluntarily. And yet: the talks are not superfluous, for they reveal paths where there seemed to be only dead ends.

Luc-Carolin Ziemann


Nominated for the Film Prize Leipziger Ring

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

International Programme
Advantage Mohammad Kart

A man yet or still a boy? This is the pivotal decision in a home for addicts in Tehran, where you have to face up to your dependencies if you want to get off the streets for good.

Advantage

Documentary Film
2016
68 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Mohammad Kart, Aban Askari
Mohammad Kart
Saba Neda’ee
Javad Razzaqizadeh
Esma’il Alizadeh
Mohammad Kart
Mehdi Kart
There is a place in Tehran where you learn whether you’re a man or still a boy. At least that’s how a member of the staff at a home where several dozens of men have found shelter to escape life on the street describes it. They all share a problem with addiction, injected heroin and cocaine, lived on garbage and left their families. In the home they want to get back on their feet, detoxify and learn to lead abstinent lives. Mohammad Kart is there when Hossein is admitted, a young man who has been mainlining for two years and promises to obey the rules. “I’ll remind you in 3 days.” Cold turkey comes next. Hossein and several others squirm in a room, sweat, have spasms. At last he is welcomed in a festive ceremony. He is even asked to play in the home’s football team, who are preparing for a prominent opponent.

Kart combines light episodes of community and hope with individual trips to nocturnal shelters on the outskirts of the Iranian capital. Images of misery alternate with images of sunrays shining into the dormitory in the morning, while bracing music is to lend support at the start of a new day.

Carolin Weidner

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Maned & Macho

Animated Film
2017
11 minutes
subtitles: 
_without dialogue / subtitles
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Shiva Sadegh Asadi
Shiva Sadegh Asadi
Amir Pourkhalaji
Shiva Sadegh Asadi
Mohammad Nasseri, Shiva Sadegh Asadi
Shiva Sadegh Asadi
Shiva Sadegh Asadi
Changiz Sayad
An adolescent girl rejects the social role it’s meant to play and hides all her feelings and thoughts in a secret world filled with animal creatures. Over time it grows into a large outdoor enclosure for all kinds of quiet fantasies, dreams and fears which soon become untameable. Shiva Sadegh Asadi uses fascinating, flowing paintings to talk quietly about an “I” that grows louder and louder.

André Eckardt


Nominated for Young Eyes Film Award

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Post-Angst
Tunnel Maryam Kashkoolinia

Transporting a sheep, a man finds himself on a dangerous, sand animated course through an underground that has political backgrounds.

Tunnel

Animated Film
2012
7 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Mohammad Habibi
Maryam Kashkoolinia
Maryam Kashkoolinia
Maryam Kashkoolinia
Maryam Kashkoolinia
Maryam Kashkoolinia
Hosein Mafi
Transporting a sheep, a man finds himself on a dangerous, sand animated course through an underground that has political backgrounds.

Franziska Bruckner

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

A157

Documentary Film
2015
70 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Behrouz Nouranipour (Soureh Documentary Centre)
Behrouz Nouranipour
Mehdi Azadi
Behrouz Nooranipour, Kamran Jahedi
Behnam Sheikhahmadi
One of the most horrifying Isis operations was the physical and cultural genocide of the Yezidi Kurds in Iraq. After conquering the Shingal region west of Mossul the terrorist militia began to systematically kill the male population while thousands of children, girls and women were kidnapped, enslaved, forced into marriage or raped. Very few of them managed to escape and the survivors are marked for the rest of their lives. Like the sister Hailin and Roken and their friend Soolaf who live in a refugee camp on the Turkish-Syrian border in the UNHCR tent number 157. A miserable place, cold, rainy and oppressive, like the suffering etched deeply into the girls’ faces.

Iranian filmmaker Behrouz Nouranipour approaches the fate of his protagonists by reducing the visual level almost exclusively to the interior of the tent. This is where the girls huddle day after day, without expectations, alone, without protection. Their memories of the old life and its dreams, of parents and siblings who are lost or dead, and the depictions of the atrocities inflicted on them by the Jihadists evoke an image of dehumanisation that’s deeply harrowing. Who could close their heart to this suffering?

Matthias Heeder


Nominated for Young Eyes Film Award

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Ayan and the White Balloon

Documentary Film
2015
26 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
KASK Academy of art, Gent University, Belgium
Vida Dena
Emad, Meisam, Ali, Pooyan
Vida Dena
Dieter Diependaele, Vida Dena
Vida Dena
Milad, Michel Coquette
Hiding: behind masks, the white balloon, a fiction. The fears run deep. After five years in exile in Europe the director returns to Iran to make a film. She asks her friends to act in it. What starts as a game during the shoot gradually turns into a brutal clash between those who stayed and the one who left. Who has the prerogative of interpretation? What is a stereotype, what does the West want to see, what do the Iranians want to reveal about themselves?

Cornelia Klauß

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

The Black Flag

Documentary Film
2015
62 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Majed Neisi
Majed Neisi
Mahvash Sheykholeslami
Majed Neisi
Mani Hashemian
October 2014, the Shiite militia attack a small town in Southern Iraq that’s occupied by IS terrorists. Among the militiamen is the Iranian director Majed Neisi, armed with his camera. “Black Flag” is a rough, direct and extraordinarily authentic film about a war of whose reality we have no idea.

Take the fighters, for example: volunteers who are Shiite believers following their religious leader’s fatwa, untouched by doubt. They take the director to the seat of the former IS Sharia court. People were condemned here, decapitated there – “our cause is just”. Or the logistical problems: where do you get explosives, missiles, ammunition? A price is negotiated on the phone, 400 dollars for 1,000 rounds. A private donator pays. And finally the attack: the militia must move through a dense palm grove. There’s shooting and screaming everywhere, grenades hit, mines are dug out with bare hands, a bulldozer cuts a swath through the trees. The camera, always in the wake of the fighters, can hardly follow the chaotic events. Suddenly it’s over and the dead are carried away.

This is not war reporting but documentary work at the limit. For, as the director says, what else can he contribute to the fight against ISIS? He deserves the highest respect for this.

Matthias Heeder

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.