Film Archive

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Documentary Film
Iceland,
Poland
2018
61 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Łukasz Długołęcki, Haukur M. Hrafnsson
Paweł Ziemilski
Arni Valur Kristinsson, Martina Bertoni
Filip Drożdż
Dorota Wardęszkiewicz
Paweł Ziemilski, Łukasz Długołęcki, Haukur M. Hrafnsson
Piotr Kubiak, Paweł Szygendowski
On the road to a better life you are inevitably forced to leave many things behind. The Polish village of Stare Juchy is such a left-behind place. Since the 1980s, a third of its population emigrated to Iceland and none of them have returned to date. The relatives who stayed in Poland – usually the emigrants’ parents and grandparents – participate via Skype and Facebook in the lives of those who left. They rarely manage to visit each other. In the village, which is still getting emptier, time stands still and its inhabitants become the observers of events far from their surroundings. Their children have careers as police officers or construction managers, their grandchildren sing Icelandic pop songs, and they themselves have no choice but to report on the weather or the mushroom harvest. Every so often, a tentative missing feeling, even a menacing longing, creeps into the conversations. The hope for a reunion dies last.

Paweł Ziemilski uses sequences shot in Iceland that he projects on every imaginable surface in the Polish village. Thus polar lights shine in the living room, a grandfather plays football with his grandson’s image and a gym becomes an icy coast. This aesthetic trick emphasizes the melancholy and absurdity of a situation in which the supposedly better and the supposedly worse life are closely interlinked.

Kim Busch

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

International Programme
The Briefing Filip Drzewiecki

Constantly alternating between stress and exhaustion: Filip Drzewiecki shows medical students in practical training – with a mimetic interest in the physical nature of the profession.

The Briefing

Documentary Film
Poland
2018
19 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Ewa Jastrzębska, Jerzy Kapuściński
Filip Drzewiecki
Jakub Giza
Paweł Laskowski
Filip Drzewiecki
Aleksandra Pniak, Weronika Raźna, Franciszek Kozłowski
Stress is followed by exhaustion and exhaustion is followed by stress. A briefing, then things must move quickly: 37 patients, 10 discharges, 2 admissions, 0 deaths. With a mimetic interest in the physicality of the profession, Filip Drzewiecki follows medical students in practical training at the hospital: sensitive and stressed, curious and febrile. Add a soundtrack vibrant with surging blood.

Lukas Stern

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

International Programme
How to Destroy Time Machines Jacek Piotr Bławut

Jeph Jerman rubs sticks against each other and records leaves smacking against windows. He drops stones and little bones. Jerman is a sound and mind researcher.

How to Destroy Time Machines

Documentary Film
Poland
2017
39 minutes
subtitles: 
No
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Anną Bławut-Mazurkiewicz
Jacek Piotr Bławut
Adam Palenta
Aleksandra Gowin, Katarzyna Śpioch
Jeph Jerman rubs sticks against each other and records leaves smacking against windows. He drops stones and little bones. He thinks, listens, takes notes. The Arizona-based experimental musician wants to trick those time machines installed deep in his consciousness. They toss him from yesterday into tomorrow, just leaving out that precious now. Jerman is a sound and mind researcher.

Carolin Weidner

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

International Programme
21 x New York Piotr Stasik

Scared and wide-awake, enlightened and confused, horny and satisfied: people in NYC. The A-train provides the narrative pattern for fast-paced image flows and meditative passages. A pop pearl.

21 x New York

Documentary Film
Poland
2016
70 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Agnieszka Wasiak
Piotr Stasik
Piotr Stasik
Dorota Wardęszkiewicz, Tomasz Wolski, Piotr Stasik
Michał Fojcik
Maybe 21 is a random number: portraits of 21 people who together are supposed to represent the totality of the more than eight million inhabitants of New York City? Not a valid number, every statistician would say, and be right. But cinema, thank God, is only marginally concerned with statistics – if at all.

“21 x New York” opens with a picture of the A-train approaching in a subway tunnel, thus creating the pattern for its own narrative by this confident allusion to one of the greatest pieces of 20th century jazz music. What we see next: scared and cheerful people, enlightened and confused ones, horny passers-by and satisfied couples. Extremely rapid switches between them, not so much contrasting as kaleidoscopic. The fast-paced flow of images is frequently interrupted by meditative passages and overlaid by some of the protagonists’ tales or reasoning, like voices from the memory of an artificial neural network, rising from this exciting bubble. It’s almost as if Baudelaire had risen again, changed time, place and medium and started a new series of lyrical tableaux. The result would not be the “Tableaux Parisiens” but “Tableaux New Yorkaises” – or “21 x New York”.

Ralph Eue


Nominated for MDR Film Prize

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

International Programme
In Another World Anna Bedyńska

A baby is expected. Anticipated. Where is the head, where are the legs? But it’s different here – Kasia, who already has two kids and a career, must take a decision: her baby has Down’s syndrome.

In Another World

Documentary Film
Poland,
Russia
2016
26 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Marina Razbezhkina
Anna Bedyńska
Anna Bedyńska
Anna Bedyńska
Anna Bedyńska
Anna Bedyńska
A baby is expected. Anticipated. Where is the head, where are the legs? But it’s different here – Kasia, who already has two kids and a career, must take a decision: her baby has Down’s syndrome. Nine out of ten women in Germany choose an abortion in this case. For Kasia, who is catholic, this is hard to accept – as hard as the option of having the baby. Razbezhkina student Anna Bedyńska follows the family over a period of six months, in a film that touches on the last taboo of our perfect society.

Grit Lemke

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

The Gentle Giant

Animadoc
Poland
2016
11 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Piotr Furmankiewicz, Mateusz Michalak
Marcin Podolec
Rafał Samborski, Piotr Markowicz
Marcin Gierbisz
Marcin Podolec
Marcin Podolec, Wiktoria Nowak
Marcin Podolec
Katarzyna Szczerba, Marek Knaga
Delicate black and white pencil and ink drawings and painted-over photos illustrate the inner life of this 100-kilo giant plagued by doubts and fears. Poetry helped him find himself and he overcame the silence by going on stage as a slam poet. Marcin Podolec uses heterogenous animations to document the inner conflict of his protagonist.

Cornelia Klauß

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

International Programme
Don't Lose Your Head Karolina Specht

Far too much of the content of human communication never goes beyond a short-lived mind game. The speech bubbles devour themselves like the revolution which devours its children, while the system keeps reproducing itself. Is this about media, the church, politics? Let everybody decide for themselves.

Don't Lose Your Head

Animated Film
Poland
2015
4 minutes
subtitles: 
_without dialogue / subtitles
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Marcin Malatyński
Karolina Specht
Karolina Specht
Karolina Specht
Karolina Specht
Karolina Specht
Bogdan Klat, Wieslaw Nowak
Far too much of the content of human communication never goes beyond a short-lived mind game. The speech bubbles devour themselves like the revolution which devours its children, while the system keeps reproducing itself. Is this about media, the church, politics? Let everybody decide for themselves. This ironic computer animation gives the talking heads’ spiral of repetition another turn of the screw, using not language but images: the graphic icons which make our communication easier. Or not.

Lars Meyer

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

International Programme
Fences Natalia Krawczuk

A lonely tree in a forest of wooden boards – and a small bird that adores him. Two dogs barking at each other while they are separated by pickets. People who fence themselves in or don’t notice when fences disappear.

Fences

Animated Film
Poland
2015
7 minutes
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Marcin Malatyński
Natalia Krawczuk
Natalia Krawczuk
Magdalena Chowańska
Natalia Krawczuk
Natalia Krawczuk
Ewa Bogusz
A lonely tree in a forest of wooden boards – and a small bird that adores him. Two dogs barking at each other while they are separated by pickets. People who fence themselves in or don’t notice when fences disappear. These grotesque episodes about rehearsed border behaviour could also have been made by Roy Andersson. But unlike the latter’s opulent living tableaus, Natalia Krawczuk reduces her visual language to a simple style of drawing that allows for political interpretations.

Lars Meyer

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

International Programme
Snails Grzegorz Szczepaniak

Enchantingly portrayed snails, two young entrepreneurs and wealth on the horizon of desires are the point of departure of this Polish comedy about great ambitions and broken dreams.

Snails

Documentary Film
Poland
2015
30 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Zuzanna Król
Grzegorz Szczepaniak
Mikołaj Majkusiak
Daniel Wawrzyniak, Marek Kozakiewicz
Wojciech Janas
Grzegorz Szczepaniak
Paulina Bocheńska
Enchantingly portrayed snails, two young entrepreneurs and wealth on the horizon of desires are the point of departure of this Polish comedy about great ambitions and broken dreams. Breeding snails is a science of its own and replete with obstacles. Though our young entrepreneurs give their best, the snails obstinately resist, no matter how slow they are.

Matthias Heeder

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

The Dybbuk. A Tale of Wandering Souls

Documentary Film
Poland,
Sweden,
Ukraine
2015
90 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Krzysztof Kopczyński, David Herdies, Gennady Kofman
Krzysztof Kopczyński
Jacek Petrycki, Serhiy Stefan Stetsenko
Michał Leszczyłowski
Krzysztof Kopczyński
Mateusz Adamczyk, Marcin Lenarczyk, Sebastian Witkowski
Right at the start, an excerpt from the Yiddish-language Polish 1930s classic “The Dybbuk” opens an old wound: the world of the shtetl with its old folk beliefs has vanished. But the spirit of the dead, the Dibbuk, is still walking among us. And it has many faces.

We re-emerge from the past to find ourselves in the Ukrainian town of Uman just before “Euromaidan”. A sacred place for thousands of orthodox Jews who make the pilgrimage to the grave of the Hassidic rabbi Nachman and transform the town, annoying the Ukrainian citizens who are afraid of a sell-out and react with provocations. Sometimes it’s an illegally raised cross, sometimes an information board in honour of the anti-Semitic Cossack leader and butcher Ivan Gonta. Or, rather more subtly, extra fees for kosher snacks.

The worlds clash on many levels. With great curiosity, Krzysztof Kopczyński captures the almost incompatible legends and rituals that come alive on both sides. On the one hand a completely impoverished country in the process of finding its identity, accompanied by nationalistic overtones. On the other hand a lost tradition and the experience of the Holocaust. Who owns the country? The film mines a wealth of material full of impressions, rough scenes and fables to bring the unexpected to light.

Lars Meyer

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Of a Forest

Animated Film
Poland
2014
4 minutes
subtitles: 
_without dialogue / subtitles
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Marcin Malatyński
Katarzyna Melnyk
Katarzyna Melnyk
Katarzyna Melnyk
Katarzyna Melnyk
Katarzyna Melnyk, Monika Dębińska
The disturbing story of an animal that doesn’t feel at home in the world of humans.

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

International Programme
Super Unit Teresa Czepiec

Le Corbusier’s machine for living as an immense prefab block of flats in the Polish town of Katowice. A mirror cabinet of longings, different passions and carefully cultivated quirks.

Super Unit

Documentary Film
Poland
2014
20 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Adam Ślesicki
Teresa Czepiec
Paweł Dyllus
Jerzy Zawadzki
Teresa Czepiec
Krzysztof Ridan
The film opens with a reference to the famous Swiss architect Le Corbusier, whose vision of the new architecture culminated in the term “dwelling machine”. In one of his theses he tried to measure human needs by units. How much space does a human being need? How much is he or she entitled to? A giant modern building at the centre of Katowice, the biggest in Poland, is the concrete embodiment of this idea. Endless corridors and rattling utilities connect the more than 700 flats built in the late 1960s. But every door conceals a mirror cabinet of desires and longings that emerge in various preferences and hobbies. Adieu tristesse! This is where people live, celebrate and, if need be, remove the casing of a garage, not because the car is too big, but because it’s the people who turn this building into a “super unit” and vigorously clear the necessary space. A few sketches are enough to portray the residents as they conquer this inhospitable space. The “dwelling machine” turns out to be an organism that’s borne up by the motto “live and let live”.
Cornelia Klauß

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Walking Under Water

Documentary Film
Germany,
Poland,
UK
2014
77 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Moniką Braid, Stefan Kloos
Elizą Kubarską
Michał Jacaszek
Piotr Rosołowski, Lisa Strohmayer
Bartosz Pietras
This is a film about a fairytale that was once true. Not so long ago, an unusual tribe lived on Borneo: the Badjao, who lived in and under water more than on dry land. They had neither passports nor money, but astonishing abilities. From earliest childhood they learn to dive and do without breathing for a long time. They move between shoals of fish and coral reefs like strollers who are at home there. Alexan, the last of his kind, teaches 10-year-old Sulu how to catch fish without modern appliances. The filmmaker Elizą Kubarską leaves no doubt about her fascination: in elaborate images that transcend every television documentary she dives into an idyllic and picturesque underwater world. She reminds us where we originally came from. And she shows us where we’re headed in equally unequivocal scenes: as the nomads, who are considered stateless today, vanish, they take their traditional knowledge and century old rituals with them. The rest is done by the fishing fleets and tourists.
Cornelia Klauß

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

Ab Ovo

Animated Film
Poland
2013
6 minutes
subtitles: 
_without dialogue / subtitles
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Marcin Malatyński
Anita Kwiatkowska-Naqvi
George Antoniv
Anita Kwiatkowska-Naqvi
Anita Kwiatkowska-Naqvi
Anita Kwiatkowska-Naqvi
Anita Kwiatkowska-Naqvi
The film shows a new life waking up and the transformation of a female body which loses its former shape. The physical sensation becomes increasingly more distinct until the moment when the baby leaves the boundaries of the mothers body.

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

International Programme
Mother 24/7 Marcin Janos Krawczyk

The picture of the Black Madonna of Częstochowa in living rooms, hospitals or prisons. A touching episodic look at the lives of believers searching for answers and comfort.

Mother 24/7

Documentary Film
Poland
2013
30 minutes
subtitles: 
English
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Marcin Janos Krawczyk
Marcin Janos Krawczyk
Michał Lorenc
Marcin Sauter, Michał Marczak, Marcin Kukielski, Karolina Krawczyk
Anna Wagner, Aleksandra Panisko, Tymek Wiskirski
Blessed are the believers?! For the past 55 years, the Black Madonna of the Polish town of Częstochowa has been wandering from house to house, from fate to fate. A copy of the icon, cut down to a handy, portable size, can be rented for 24 hours for a private mass in one’s living room, at the hospital, or in prison. The presence of the miraculous image interrupts daily routines, evokes essential and existential questions of life. It’s about guilt and forgiveness, life on this earth and beyond, the hope of a miracle.
Director Marcin Janos Krawczyk follows the Saint’s convoy through contemporary Poland with great empathy. He finds moving episodes to give us insights into the lives of people wounded in body and soul, who are looking to religion for answers that real life refused to give them. The theme of the mother with whom one seeks reconciliation runs through the film like a thread. The combination of evocative music, long travellings, and the intimacy of encounters that are more like confessions creates a magnetic force that makes the film seem like a kind of cinematic pilgrimage.

Cornelia Klauß

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.

International Programme
The Love Equation of Henry Fast Agnieszka Elbanowska

An old mathematics professor and his erotic fantasies and appetites. A touching story of desires beyond the age of 95 – and spicy comic strips drawn by himself.

The Love Equation of Henry Fast

Documentary Film
Poland
2013
40 minutes
Credits DOK Leipzig Logo
Adam Ślesicki
Agnieszka Elbanowska
Paweł Nadolny
Agnieszka Elbanowska, Maryla Torbus
Agnieszka Elbanowska
The universal validity of an equation can be proved by axioms or assumed to be an axiom itself. A classic axiom describes an immediately evident or conventionally accepted principle or reference to such a principle. The principles on which Polish mathematics professor Henryk Fast’s love equation is based may be deduced by interpreting his erotic drawings. In any case, they suggest that Henryk Fast has more than abstract desires at his fairly advanced age. Henryk is a hopeless romantic and would quite simply like to find a woman. The search might be complicated by the fact that one’s own idea of reality doesn’t necessarily correspond to another person’s. In Henryk’s case the magnitude of this difference can be glimpsed occasionally, for example when his daughter, who lives in America, visits him. Henryk’s equation contains at least one unknown that makes this amiable gentleman’s life so special and tells a touching story of desire at old age, beyond “conventionally accepted” realities.

Claudia Lehmann

The annotations to the films in the Official Selection were written by the members of the selection committee and guest authors. All quotes from DOK Leipzig catalogue articles must be identified as such and cite the author’s name. Some original titles and names have been transcribed resp. transliterated. We apologise that we cannot cite individual image sources and rights in our festival publications or festival coverage. Please note that the visual material is published exclusively for the purposes of promoting specific films or festival programmes. No transmission to third parties is provided and would only take place with the explicit agreement of the owners of the rights. The rights to the images lie with the respective copyright owners.